(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "General information"














I 






) H 





L I B RAHY 

OF THE 

UN IVE.R.SITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

C 

N8\<4eH 

\9\0/tl- 

\3V8/\9 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/generalinformati191011191819stat 



NORTH DAKOTA 

State Normal- 
Industrial School 

ELLENDALE, NORTH DAKOTA 

N-I 



U3RARY 

Of THE 

ItK'VfRSITY OF 111'**'*- 



Catalog Number 

APRIL, A. D., 1911 



CATALOG NUMBER 



^urtif Dakota 



M3«AtY 
Of TH£ 

Vol. 6 April, 1911 No. 2 



Published quarterly by the 

STATE NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North Dakota. 



Entered August 8, 1907, at Ellendale. North Dakota, under 
the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



"No man is sound either in vision or in judgment who holds him- 
self apart from the work of society." — Mabie. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

F. L. Walker, President, Ellendale 
E. Magoffin, Monango. 
R. McCarten, Cogswell. 
H. Landblom, Fargo. 
H. H. Perry, Ellendale. 



FACULITY 



W. M. Kern. B. S., Southern Indiana Normal, 1886; A. B., State 
University of Indiana, 1894; A. M., State University of Indiana, 
1909; Instructor in Science, Fairfield College, 1894-5; Super- 
intendent city schools 1895-1905; Institute conductor, 1897- 
1905; State Normal-Industrial School, 1905-. 

President 
Education 

A. E. Dunphy. Eau Claire, Wis., School of Mechanic Arts; Special 
Student Wisconsin University, 1907. Teacher of Mechanic 
Arts, Eau Claire, 1895-8; Waukesha Industrial School 1898-9; 
State Normal-Industrial School, 1899-. 

Director of Mechanic Arts 

E. W. Ackert. Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899; 
B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901; A. B., Drake University, 1907. 
Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State Normal-Industrial 
School, 1907-. 

Mathematics 



W. G. Bowers. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1905; A. M., Indiana State University, 
1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1903-5; Principal of Schools, Leesburg, O., 1905-6; 
Instructor in Science, Indiana Normal, 1906-7 ; State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1907-. 

Science 



A. Cooley. B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; 
Graduate Kansas Wesleyan Business College, 1907; Master of 
Accounts, Kansas Wesleyan University, 1910; State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1909-. 

Commercial Arts 
Military Science 



Marcia Ingalls. Graduate New England Conservatory of Music, 
1895; Emerson School of Oratory, 1898. Teacher of Voice in 
Grayson College, 1898-9; Texas Christian University, 1900-02; 
Hamilton College, 1904-5; State Normal-Industrial School, 
1908-. 

Girls' Physical Training 
Vocal Music 

Myrtle M. Jones. B. A., University of Minnesota, 1907; State 
Normal-Industrial School, 1907-. 

German * 
History 

Mary B. Flemington. Graduate State Normal-Industrial School, 
1903; A. B., University of North Dakota, 1907; Instructor 
State Normal- Industrial School, 1905-06; Principal of High 
School, 1908-09; State Normal-Industrial School, 1909-. 

English 

Gabriella C. Brendemuhl. A. B., Carleton College, 1905. 
Teacher of German and Preceptress, Rochester Academy, 
1905-08; High School Principal, 1908-10; State Normal-In- 
dustrial School, 1910-. 

Preceptress 
English 

Latin* 

Lola Edmunds. Graduate Carleton College School of Music, 1906; 
Student of Hermann Zoch, 1907-8; graduate student in music, 
Carleton College, 1909; State Normal-Industrial School, 1909-. 

Piano 

Louise Frear Pinkney. Graduate Minneapolis School of Fine 
Arts, 1906; graduate Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
1908; Instructor in Fine Arts, So. Dak. Wesleyan University, 
1908-9; Supervisor of Art, Public Schools, Rochester, Minn. 
1909-10; State Normal- Industrial School, 1910-. 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 

Clara Orton Smith. B. S., Ohio State University, 1908; Fellow in 
Domestic Science Ohio State University, 1908-09; Assistant in 

*To be filled. 



Domestic Science, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1909-10; 
State Normal-Industrial School, 1910-. 
Home Economics 

Halle B. Hills. University of Michigan, 1907; Teacher in Public 
Schools, 1908; Graduate in Domestic Science and Art, Pratt 
Institute, 1910; State Normal-Industrial School, 1910-. 
Home Economics 

May Holte. Graduate in Home Economics, State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1908; Assistant in Home Economics, State 
Normal- Industrial School (Short Term) 1908-10-. 
Assistant in Home Economics 

L. B. Fields. M. E., Purdue University, 1907; Assistant in Prac- 
tical Mechanics, Purdue University, 1905-07; Instructor in 
Mechanical Drawing and Pattern Making, Indiana Industrial 
School, 1907-10; Normal-Industrial School, 1910-. 

Mechanic Arts 

Steam Engines 

W. A. Broyles. B. S., Tri-State College, 1905; A. B., Indiana 
University, 1908; Principal Township Schools, Gaston, Indiana, 
1903-7; Teacher of Science, Elwood, Ind. High School, 1908-10; 
State Normal-Industrial School, 19 10-. 

Science 
Physical Training 

Carrie Tuttle. A. B., Wittenberg College, 1896; Student in 
Library Economy, Chicago University, 1904-6. State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1907-. 

Librarian 

Grace S. Kane 
Grammar Grade, Training School 

E. Darhler 

N. I. Band and Orchestra 

Violin 

Mrs. Nellie Carpenter 
Matron 

Carrie Steele 
Clerk 



James Watt conferred on his native land more solid benefits than 
all the treaties she ever made and all the battles she ever won." — Draper. 



CALENDAR 



1911 

FALL TERM of Thirteen Weeks begins, Monday, September 25 
Registration and Entrance Examinations, Monday, September 25 



Organization of Classes, 
Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A. 

Thanksgiving Holiday, 
Fall Term Ends, 



Wednesday, September 27 
and Faculty Reception, 

Monday, October 2 

Thursday, November 30 

Friday, December 22 



1912 



WINTER TERM of Thirteen Weeks begins, 


Monday, January 8 


Registration and Entrance Examinations, 


Monday, January 8 


Class Work begins, 


Tuesday, January 9 


Annual Military Contest 


Friday, April 5 


Company A, Reception and Banquet, 


Saturday, April 6 


Winter Term Ends, 


Saturday, April 6 


SPRING TERM of Ten Weeks begins, 


Tuesday, April 9 


Field Day, Schools, 


Friday, May 17 


Memorial Day, Holiday, 


Thursday, May 30 


Baccalaureate Sermon, 


Sunday, June 9 


Annual Oratorical and Declamatory Contest, Monday, June 10 


Annual School Concert 


Tuesday, June 11 


Field Day, N-I, 1 P. M. 


, Wednesday, June 12 


Junior-Senior Reception, 


Wednesday, June 12 


Commencement, 10:30 A. M., 


Thursday, June 13 


President's Reception, 


Thursday, June 13 


Alumni Reception, 


Friday, June 14 



"What a man does is an authentic revelation of what he is and by 
their works men are j airly and rightly judged." 



The Normal Department 



HNE of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota is 
well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer, who has studied public 
school conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other re- 
quirement relating to education is of such pressing importance. 
The act which defines the mission of the State Normal-Industrial 
School requires it to train teachers "in the science of education 
and the art of teaching in the public schools with special refer- 
ence to manual training." In harmony with the spirit of this 
mandate the standard normal course has been so planned as to 
afford thorough and systematic training of a three-fold character: 

(1) Academic: The academic courses imply a thorough and com- 
prehensive literary and scientific training. Thorough and accu- 
rate scholarship is the teacher's most fundamental equipment. 

(2) Industrial: Courses in which the student's powers of ex- 
pression are trained jointly with his receptive faculties. 

(3) Professional: Scholarship alone is not sufficient. All right 
teaching is based upon certain well-defined principles of individual 
and social development, and upon a clear comprehension of the 
theories which underlie practice. Opportunity is afforded for 
applying the principles in practice and for studying the results under 
sympathetic and competent supervision. 

NORMAL COURSES 

The State Normal-Industrial School offers three normal courses 
and the student is permitted to elect the one he shall pursue. These 
courses are as follows : 

(1) An Elementary Course for Rural Teachers. 



12 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(2) A Four- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates. 

(3) A Five- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates, 

Elementary Course for Rural Teachers, (io ^ months) 



Fall Term 



Winter Term Spring Term Summer Term 



Grammar 


Grammar 


Grammar 




History 


History 


History 


Physiology and 

Hygiene 
Spelling 
Penmanship 
Reviews 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Geography 


Geography 


Civics 


Manual Train'g 


Drawing 


Domestic Art 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Pedagogy 





Physical Training throughout the school year. 

Students, to enter upon the above course, must be at least 17 
years of age and must either have completed the common school 
course of study or have been granted a certificate to teach in North 
Dakota. Those who complete the course will receive a second grade 
certificate. 



FOUR YEAR COURSES 



The electives offered make possible the following four-year 
schedules. 

(1) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course. 

(4) Latin course. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



13 



II 



III 



IV 



Grammar 3 


Rhet.&Comp. 3 


Literature 3 


Obs. &Prac. \y 2 


History 2 
Civics 1 


Genl. History 3 




Review & Meth. 3 


Artihmetic 3 


Algebra 3 


Geometry 1 % 


Geometry 3 


Geography 3 


Agriculture 3 


Biology 3 


Physics 3 


Music 3 


Drawing 3 


Psychology 3 


Hist.& Phil, of Ed. 3 






Elective 3 


Elective 3 



Physical training and rhetoricals throughout the course. 
Required for graduation, 60 units, 6 of which are electives. 

i. English. 

The study of language is continued throughout three years. 

(a) Grammar. The principles of English grammar. Course I. 

(b) Literature i. Composition, Rhetoric and the study of 
Masterpieces. Course II. 

(c) Literature ii. The critical study of the masters and a 
definite amount of reading. Course III. 



2. History and Civics. 

(a) American history. An academic study and review de- 
signed to familiarize students with the sequence of American 
History. Course VI. 

(b) Civics. Colonial, Revolutionary and Federal Government. 
Course VII. 

(c) Ancient history. The essentials of history from the 
earliest civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the establish- 
ment of the western empire by Charles the Great. Course VIII. 

(d) English history. Mediaeval and Modern European His- 
tory down to the present day. Course IX. 



14 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



3. Mathematics. 

(a) Algebra. Elementary Algebra to quadratic equations. 
Course XII. 

(b) Plane geometry. Introduction ; half-year course. Course 
XIV. 

(c) Solid geometry. Plane and solid geometry completed. 
Course XV. 



4. Science. 

(a) Geography. A comprehensive and critical study of de- 
scriptive geography. Course XVI. 

(b) Physical geography. Physical ages of the earth; under- 
lying causes ; effect upon mankind, etc. Course XVII. 

(c) Agriculture. Soils, crops, animal husbandry. Course 
XX. 

(d) Zoology. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work. 
Course XXI. 

(e) Botany. Study of types, their life history, relation to sur- 
roundings , etc . Course XXII. 

(/) Physics. A full and comprehensive treatment of the sub- 
ject by means of lectures, recitations and laboratory work. 
Course XXIII. 



5. Education. 

(a) Psychology. The processes by which knowledge is ac- 
quired and elaborated. Course XXIX. 

(b) History of education. The educational systems of an- 
cient and modern peoples together with a study of the lives and 
practices of the educational reformers. Course XXX. 

(c) Philosophy of education. The nature and meaning of 
education and the being to be educated. Course XXXI. 

(d) Reviews and methods. Senior reviews and approved 
methods. Course XXXIII. 

(e) Observation and practice. Actual experience under 
conditions similar to those the student must meet after gradu- 
ation. Course XXXV. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



15 



6. Vocal Music. 

(a) Tune, time, technique, etc. The principles of music as 
applied in instruction in the grades of the public schools. Musical 
appreciation. Course LXXXI. 

7. Drawing. 

(a) Taught, not as an end, but as a means; a mode of ex- 
pression. Course LXXIII. 

8. Electives. 

Six units, two year subjects, as follows: 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LXI to LXXI. 
(6) Manual training. Courses LVII to LX. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XXXVII to XL. 

(e) German. Courses XLI to XLIII. 

FIVE YEAR COURSES 

The electives offered make possible the following schedules: 

(1) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course. 

(4) Latin course. 



I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


Grammar 3 


Composition 
& Rhetoric 3 


Literature 3 


Rev. and 
Meth. IK 


Rev. and 
Methods 3 


History 2 
Civics 1 


Gen. History 3 




Modern 
History 3 


Sociology 3 


Arithmetic 3 


Algebra 3 


Geom. \y 2 


Geometry 3 




Geography 3 


Agriculture 3 


Biology 3 


Physics 3 


Chemistry 3 


Music 3 




Psychol. 3 


Hist, and 
Phil.ofEd. 3 


Observation 
& Practice li 


Drawing 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 



Physical Training and Rhetoricals throughout the course. 



1G NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

In the Five-Year Courses the English, History, Mathematics, 
Science and Education Schedules are identical with those of the 
four-year courses with the following exceptions: 



I. Chemistry. 

The laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles de- 
veloped in the recitation and laboratory. Courses XXIV — XXV. 



II. Sociology. 

Principles of Sociology. A systematic study of the principles 
underlying the structure of society. Course XXXVI. 



III. Reviews and Methods. 

Senior Reviews and emphasis upon methods of presentation. 
Course XXXIV. 



IV. Electives. 

Twelve units, four-year courses, as follows: 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LXI to LXXI. 

(b) Manual training. Courses LVII to LX. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XXXVII to XL. 

(e) German. Courses XLI to XLIII. 



HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 

Graduates of first class high schools or those who have com- 
pleted equivalent courses will be graduated from the Four- Year 
Course or the Five-Year Course after one or two years work re- 
spectively. Such persons will be required to complete courses in 
Psychology, History and Philosophy of Education, Practice, 
Methods and Reviews and sufficient electives to total 15 or 30 units 
according to the course. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 17 

TEACHERS OF MANUAL TRAINING, DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

AND ART 

The demand for teachers of Manual Training and Domestic 
Science and Art greatly exceeds the supply and as a result the wages 
paid is much in advance of that offered in other lines. In almost 
every other line of teaching the supply exceeds the demand. Grad- 
uates of the Four-Year Course who have elected Manual Training or 
Domestic Science and Art will be authorized to teach in any of the 
common, graded or high schools of the state, except in the high 
school departments of schools doing four years of high school work. 
Graduates of the Five- Year Course who have elected Manual Train- 
ing or Domestic Science and Art will be authorized to teach in simi- 
lar high schools and, in addition, to teach their elective, Manual 
Training or Domestic Science and Art, in any class of high schools. 
The Five- Year Course in Manual Training and Domestic Science and 
Art is especially designed to prepare teachers in these special sub- 
jects for positions in First Class High Schools, Normal Schools, 
Academies, etc. No other school in the northwest is better equipped 
to train teachers in these special subjects. No other school in North 
Dakota is so well equipped to train teachers in these special subjects. 
The faculty offers every proper aid to graduates to secure positions. 



11 The real profit of a day's work in the world can never be esti- 
mated in terms of money; it can be estimated only in terms of character." 



"The working races have been the victorious races; the non- 
working races have been the subject races." — Mabie. 



The Industrial Department 






One purpose of the State of North Dakota in establishing the 
STATE NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL was to provide an 
institution in which young men and young women might receive 
such special instruction and training as would prepare them to earn 
their own livings and to take their places as useful and self-sup- 
porting members of society. The state requires that the school 
shall instill into the minds of young men and young women a true 
appreciation of the value, desirability and dignity of skilled labor; 
that it shall prepare them for immediate and well-directed ac- 
tion in the practical affairs of life — that they shall be trained TO 
DO as well as TO THINK. In harmony with this thought, the 
State Normal-Industrial School offers such industrial courses as 
shall prepare students for higher living and more efficient ser- 
vice in the HOME, the SHOP, the FIELD and the OFFICE. 



INDUSTRIAL COURSES 

The following industrial courses are offered. In each of these 
courses thorough and systematic instruction is prescribed in English, 
Mathematics, History and Science. 

I. Mechanic Arts Course. 

This Course is designed to afford a thorough training in Me- 
chanical Drawing and in the use and application of tools; to pre- 



22 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

pare young men to enter upon higher technical courses; to train 
all 'round mechanics. 

(i) Joinery and turnery. Care and use of the common 

tools and the mastery of the lathe. Courses XLIV, XLV, 

XLVI. 

(2) Forging. Drawing out, bending, welding, making of 
useful articles. Course XLVII. 

(3) Pattern making and molding. The making of pat- 
terns; foundry practice. Courses XLIX, L. 

(4) Chipping and filing. For the purpose of developing 
skill in the use of the file and cold chisel. Course LI. 

(5) Machine shop practice. Tool making, tool work, tool 
and screw work. Course LII. 

(6) Drawing. Freehand, mechanical. Courses LIII, LIV, 
LV, LVI. 

II. Home Economics Course. 

Designed to train young women to administer intelligently and 
wisely the affairs of a home; to afford thorough instruction in the 
principles that underlie artistic dressmaking; to train for positions 
as dressmakers, matrons, house-keepers, seamstresses and home 
makers. 

(1) Hand sewing. Materials, stitches, measurements, 
draughting and making. Course LXI. 

(2) Machine sewing. Care and use of machine and ma- 
chine sewing. 

(3) Dressmaking. Measuring, drafting, cutting, fitting and 
making. Course LXII. 

(4) Design. Use of pencil and water color; study of bows 
gowns and drapery; the human form; designing gowns for home 
and street. Course LXV. 

(5) Elementary cookery. Classification of foods; princi- 
ples of cooking application. Course LXVI. 

(6) Advanced cookery. Composition, value and cost. 
Course LXVIII. 

(7) Investigation into household problems. Course 
LXIX. 

(8) Chemistry. General and analytic chemistry. Courses 
XXIV, XXV. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 23 

(9) Food Analysis. The chemistry of foods. Course 
XXVI. 

(10) Bacteriology. Principles, their significance and ap- 
plication to life. Course XXVII. 

III. Fine Arts Course. 

Designed to afford a culture course in fine arts; to train students 
to fill positions as teachers and supervisors of Drawing and Art 
Instruction ; and to afford instruction in the principles of design and 
their application. 

(1) Freehand drawing. Drawing in pencil and charcoal 
from ornament, still life and flowers. Course LXXII. 

(2) Applied design. Application of design to objects. 

(3) Historic ornament. Historic styles and drawings of 
the typical features of each. 

(4) Composition. Space relations, proportion, color har- 
mony, etc. 

(5) Metal work. Problems in sheet metal. Course LXXIV. 

(6) Pottery. Hand made pieces; tiles; decorations; glaz- 
ing and firing. Course LXXV. 

IV. Music Course. 

Designed to afford opportunity for culture as a fine art and to 
train teachers. 

(1) Hand culture. 

(2) Sight reading. 

(3) Major and minor scales. 

(4) Phrasing. 

(5) Graded studies and studies from masterpieces. 

(6) Harmony. 

(7) Musical history. 

(8) Courses lxxvi to lxxx. 

V. Commercial Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to fit young men and young women for positions of re- 
sponsibility and trust in the business world, such as bookkeepers, 
office clerks, amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and teachers of 
commercial subjects. 



24 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(i) Spelling. A half-year course in both oral and written 
commercial spelling including a careful drill in pronunciation, 
marking and denning. Course LXXXIII. 

(2) Penmanship. A half-year course in rapid legible writing. 
Course LXXXIV. 

(3) Commercial arithmetic Numerous problems such as 
will confront the student in the business affairs of life. Course 
LXXXVI. 

(4) Bookkeeping. Single and double entry through vari- 
ous forms of business. Course LXXXV. 

(5) Typewriting. The "touch" system. Course XC. 

(6) Commercial geography. The natural and industrial 
resources of all important countries, routes, means of communi- 
cation, etc. Course LXXXVII. 

(7) Commercial law. The various forms of commercial 
paper and the rights of the individual under the law. Course 
LXXXVIII. 

VI. Stenographic Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to prepare young men and young women for positions 
as amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and office clerks. 

(1) Spelling. Oral and written spelling; especial attention 
to pronunciation and the marking and denning of words. Course 
LXXXIII. 

(2) Penmanship. Plain, rapid, legible, business penman- 
ship. Course LXXXIV. 

(3) English. Composition and Rhetoric based upon Lock- 
wood and Emerson. Letter-writing, description, narration, 
punctuation, capitalization, etc. Course II. 

(4) Shorthand. A thorough drill in combining the signs 
into words, phrases and sentences; drills for speed, practice 
in transcribing notes, class and office dictation, etc. Course 
LXXXIX. 

(5) Typewriting. "Touch" typewriting. Course XC. 

VII. Short Course in Dressmaking. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of 
girls who desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 25 

and whose time and means are limited. This" course embraces the 

following subjects: 

(i) Arithmetic. A practical course in the elements; factor- 
ing; fractions; denominate numbers; household accounts, etc. 
Course XL 

(2) Grammar. A review of the elements of English Gram- 
mar. 

(3) Cookery. The underlying principles of cooking; daily- 
practice in cooking; table setting, serving, etc. Course LXVII. 

(4) Dressmaking. Instruction in hand sewing and dress- 
making ; the cutting, fitting and making of dresses ; thorough drill 
in pattern drafting and dressmaking. Course LXIII. 

VIII. Short Course in Farm Engineering. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course planned to meet the most prac- 
tical requirements of young men on the farm. The course includes 
the following lines of work : 

(1) Arithmetic. The elements; factoring; fractions; de- 
nominate numbers; measurements of walls, tanks, bins, lands, 
etc., accounts with farm crops; problems relating to the farm, as 
cost of fences, buildings, silos, rations, etc. ; commercial paper, etc. 
Course XL 

(2) Agriculture. Soil and Soil Water; Plant, Plant Food 
and Growth; Rotation of Crops; Germination; Seed Testing; 
Transplanting; etc. Course XIX. 

(3) Carpentry. Tools; the joints and splices necessary in 
farm construction; working drawings and construction in minia- 
ture. Course XLV. 

(4) Blacksmithing. Pupils make from stock tongs, ham- 
mer, chisels, rings, links, chains, clevises, arrow teeth, etc. 
Course XLVIII. 

(5) Engines. A study of steam engines, boilers, gas en- 
gines, power transmission, lubricants, etc., and stationary and 
traction engine practice. Courses XCI to XCIV. 



26 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



X R 



W X 

CO 

« 
P 
O 

u 

a 

H 

CO 
P 
P 



O 

M 
P 

CO 



B 



CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 












t— I 




















l— l 
1— 1 

43 

CO 




00 


in 

CD 


>> 

CO 
















•*4 


FJ 


'§ 












"w> 






O 


CD 












a 






CD 


X 












W 




Q 


O 


O 


















^ ^ 




CO 




CO 


H M 

a 


CO 










^ 

s 


1— t 

l— 1 




















43 
CO 




OS 


5 ts 


CO 






to 




<o 








• B 


"to 










s 1 






•5 


*d O 

<rf CD 


43 






•^ 




w 




Kl 


Ph 






^ 
§ 
e 














CD* 






^0 c$ 


CO 




CO 

U 
O 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 

O 

CD 

CD 




§ 

1 

Co 

•** 

<0 


to 


S -si 

2 to 

.18? 


co 




CD 

a 

CD 


2 

CD 


o 
o 


O 
3 




"S 1 ^ 

ill 

Q <j k, 


Co S <o 

^ fe, Q 


W 




o 


5 


s 


o 

43 






























+^> 










CO 


o 


H 


CO 


CO 


'g 

'cd 
u 










In 


CO 




*+> 


43 












cd 


s 


CO 

a 


CD 

a 
43 


cfl 

be 


"3 

'co 










2 


CO 


'> 


."t3 


o 

CD 


>, 

X 










e> 


p 


a 


<3 


a 


Ph 




















bJO 




















a 




















..-t 




















a 
















CO 


o 




















CD 


H 






CO 

CD 




43 

CO 




& 



9 


CD 


13 










»^3 




o 


43 


a 


*co 






CO 

B 

a 




a 
W 




■4-J 
CO 

w 


CC* 


.2 

'o 
CO 


43 









X « 



•3 ^ 

cr 1 -o 
cd § 

^ Co 

CO 



42 ct3 

3 CD 

w >. 

CD Uh 

CD L,_l 

Cd CD 



*-" XJ 

^ w 
pi 

=3 ^ 

'TS CD 

^ CD 



4j CD 
CO £L, 

CD «-. 

a! 

a I 

43 to 

CO r^J 

cd 44 i 
"3 & 



> cu 
o 

cd V 

CD «rj 

X CD 

CD 

> 

y3 



^ CD 

« .i3 

si "^ 

•5 CD 

•Q P^ 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



27 






CO 

O 



cd 

Oh 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


> 


>> 






hH 


u 








+3 


<D 


Cl> 


4h 
03 

d 


tO 

43 


> 

CD 


o 

CD 


W 


o 


s 


3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 








1— 1 

1— 1 




S* 




43 

to 


to 
a 

*to 


+3 

a 


(1) 
"+3 


'Sb- 


>^ 


o 


o 

CD 


d 


43 


<d 


W 


Ph 


o 


s 






^ X 




CO 


CO 


H i—l 
43 


CO 


I— 1 




0) K. 

bo C 




43 


o 


. a 


cd 

> 

+3 


*W) 


*o 


id o 


a 


a 


<ri co 


CD 


H 


s 


* O 


s 


CO 


CO 
Ih 

o 

to 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


3 






_, 


r— 1 


crj 


CD 


to 


IS 




> 

'•+3 


"3d 

a 


d 

CD 


bjo 


a 

CD 


H 


o 


5 


s 


CO 


(N H 


CO 


CO 






o 


p>> 








43 


>> 

fe CO 


a 


P. 

Ih 


i 


5 .a 

.22 > 


43 


Go 

o 


Vh 




'C 


<u 


O 


H 3 


<J 


O 



< 

d 

OJ 

a) 
a 

o 
'cj 



a; 
to 

(-1 
Pi 

c 
o 

CD 
43 



d 

o 

M 

d 
o 

43 

d 



.a ^ 

u 
H 

T— H 

o 
Ph 



tO 
IH 

> 

1 

d 
ed 

to 

<D 

bJO 
*o 

O 



CD 





n 




o 


CD 




d 


d 
cu 




cj 


bfl 




4-1 


CD 




CD 


43 




3 


to 




,. 


CD 




d 


to 




01 


5-i 




a 


Ph 




CD 
O 


d 
o 
o 




„ 


CD 




d 


to 




-h> 


d 




03 


o 




hJ 


o 




to 


CD 

> 


6 


> 


O 
42 


> 
+3 


+J 


oj 


CD 


o 

CD 


CD 


(1) 


41 


W 


w 


H 


■X- 



"If work had no other quality the fact that it settles a man's place 
among men would invest it with the highest dignity* 1 



Courses of Instruction 



ENGLISH 

In a practical school, the work in English is considered not the 
least practical of the various courses offered to the prospective 
student. To be an efficient citizen, one must not only be able to 
read intelligently, but must be able to give his thoughts to others 
plainly and concisely. The courses in English have been planned 
with a two-fold aim — to train the student in self-expression both in 
talking and in writing, and to cultivate the ability to read accurately 
and with appreciation. 

Training in self-expression is given throughout the four-year's 
work. As a basis, the first year student is required to review gram- 
mar, paying especial attention to the common mistakes found in 
written and spoken language. He studies the rules of punctuation 
and applies them in his written work, thereby forming correct habits. 
Letters, especially neat and exact business letters, short descrip- 
tions, stories and themes, are required regularly. 

Beginning with the first year, the following requirements for 
written work are enforced : All written work must be neat and com- 
paratively free from mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation. 
All written work is corrected by the teacher and carefully criticized 
that the pupil may see lines for improvement. The best work of 
each student, and certain required papers, are then copied into a 
permanent note-book. Study to improve self-expression in the 
second year's work includes formal rhetoric in connection with more 
numerous and longer themes. In the third and fourth years, work 
in debating, oratory, and declamation is required. Also a note- 
book with essays and themes on the literary history and master- 
pieces studied. 

Intelligent and appreciative reading is taught by the study of 



32 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

selected masterpieces of literature. Two days out of each week are 
given to this in first year English, three days each week in the other 
courses. Students are required to read aloud often, and in each 
course to memorize selections both in prose and poetry. Altho the 
technical points of the various forms of writing are discussed, the 
main aim in this work is to cultivate a love for the really great works 
of literature and to give the pupil a foundation on which to base his 
later readings. 

Special attention is given in all classes to the student's spoken 
and written language. Errors in speech are corrected and ex- 
plained when necessary. A pupil who, in any course, shows defi- 
ciency in grammar is required to take it, even though he may have 
credit in that subject. Neat legible writing is required of every 
student; special assistance is given in this, if the student needs it. 
Important and practical as it is that the student should acquire the 
ability to enjoy the literary masters, it is deemed intensely practical 
and important that he should speak and write intelligently and cor- 
rectly. 

Courses I, II and III, are required in all Industrial Courses. 
Course IV is elective. It is strongly advised, however, that all 
students take four courses of English. 

Course I. Grammar. 

Elementary. A thorough study of theoretical and applied 
grammar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the 
use of correct forms of speech with special attention to common 
errors. Elementary composition. 

Course II. Literature I. 

(a) Review of English grammar ; three recitations a week, for 
three months. 

(b) Elementary composition and rhetoric based on Lock- 
wood and Emerson's text. Letter- writing, description, nar- 
ration. An average of three recitations per week for six months. 
Special emphasis put upon punctuation, spelling, capitalization, 
paragraph structure, figures of speech. Numerous short com- 
positions are required. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Macaulay's Horatius at the 
Bridge; Burroughs' Sharp Eyes; Dickens' Christmas Carol; 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 33 

Gray's Elegy; Hawthorne's Great Stone Face, My Visit to Ni- 
agara, The Ambitious Guests, Old Ticonderoga, The Great Car- 
buncle; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Hale's The Man Without a 
Country; Irving' s Rip Van Winkle, Legend of Sleepy Hollow. 

For reading: Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Poe's Gold Bug; 
Warner's A Hunting of the Deer, How I Killed a Bear, Lost in the 
Woods, Camping Out. 

Course III. Literature II. 

(a) Advanced composition and rhetoric, two recitations a 
week. Review and continued description and narration, usage, 
diction, clearness, force, elegance, paragraphing, principles of 
versification; periodic, balanced, loose, long and short sentences; 
figures of speech. Work in composition required throughout the 
year. Special attention given to exposition and argumentation. 

(b) Masterpieces for study: Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; 
Burns' The Cotter's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, To a Mountain 
Daisy, For A' That and A' That, Epistle to J. Lapraik, Highland 
Mary, To Mary in Heaven, My Heart's in the Highlands, Bruce to 
His Men at Bannockburn, Bonnie Doon; Addison's DeCoverly 
Papers; Macaulay's Milton; Milton's Minor Poems; The Merchant 
of Venice; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. 

For reading: As You Like It, The Iliad (Books i, 6, 22, 24), 
The Lady of the Lake, Kipling's Captains Courageous. 

Course IV. Literature III. — Elective 

(a) History of English Literature based on Halleck's text. 

(b) Written reviews are required of assigned plays and work. 
The composition work is based upon the masterpieces studied and 
takes the form of critical and biographical essays. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Burke's Conciliation, Macbeth, 
Palgrave's Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrics, Milton's Para- 
dise Lost, Books I, and II., Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Bacon's 
Essays. 

For reading: Silas Marner, Julius Caesar, Ivanhoe; Tenny- 
son's The Coming of Arthur, Launcelot and Elaine, Guinevere, 
The Passing of Arthur. 



34 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course V. Literature IV — Elective. 

(a) History of American literature based on Abernethy's 
text. 

(6) Topical reports based on material in the library supple- 
mented by text books. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Aldrich's Baby Bell, Ale Yeaton's 
Son, Piscataqua River, The Little Violinist, Our New Neighbors 
at Poukapog; Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a Water-fowl, A Forest 
Hymn, The Flood of Years, The Green Mountain Boys, The Yel- 
low Violet, To the Fringed Gentian ; Emerson's Compensation, 
Self-Reliance ; Lincoln's First and Second Inaugural Addresses, 
Gettysburg Speech, The Emancipation Proclamation; Poe's 
Raven and the Bells; Taylor's Lars; Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration, and Adams and Jefferson; Whittier's The Tent on the 
Beach. 

For reading: Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac; Haw- 
thorne's House of Seven Gables or the Marble Faun; Lodge's Life 
of Webster; Parkman's LaSalle; Thoreau's The Succession of 
Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds; Warner's My Summer in a 
Garden. 



HISTORY AND CIVICS 

The courses are arranged to exhibit the essential elements in 
historical growth; cause and effect; the comparison of events; the 
growth of institutions; the influence of environment; the value of 
the past in explaining the present. 

Course VI. American History. 

Europe in 1492; American colonization; the colonies; their 
struggles; the American revolution; the Union; the Civil War; 
industrial growth ; expansion. 

Course VII. Civics. 

Such study of the constitutional history of the United States 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 35 

from its beginning to the present time and such study of the actual 
conditions of government in city, state and nation as is essential 
to prepare young men to become responsible citizens in the re- 
public. 

Course VIII. Ancient History. 

In this course a short time will be devoted to the civilization 
of the East, especially the Egyptian and the Hebrew nations. 
Most emphasis will be put upon the study of Greece and Rome; 
their religious, political and social institutions; their art, litera- 
ture and philosophy; their influence upon Western civilization. 

The work will be based upon Wolfson's Essentials in Ancient 
History, but a large number of topical reports from original 
sources and recognized authorities will be required. Daily 
throughout the first semester. 

Course IX. English History. 

Since our own history is a logical development of English 
History it is fitting that much emphasis should be laid upon that 
study. This course aims particularly to show the stages in the 
industrial, social and constitutional development of England. 
Wars, dates, lists of kings, etc., will be subordinated to the growth 
of ideas. Daily throughout the second semester. 



MATHEMATICS 

The aim of all the courses in mathematics is to train the stu- 
dent to think and reason for himself in an accurate and logical man- 
ner. To this end many original problems, requiring individual and 
independent effort, are assigned, and the student's knowledge of the 
subject is daily tested at the blackboard. Frequent reviews and 
quizzes are given in order that the various subjects may be thor- 
oughly covered and mastered. In all courses the practical value 
of the subject is constantly emphasized and to this end blackboard 
illustrations, geometrical solids, and instruments of various kinds 
are employed, supplemented by oral explanations and informal 
lectures. By these means the study of mathematics is rendered 
easier of understanding and more interesting to the student, while 



36 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

at the same time the utility of the subject and its applicability to 
problems in daily life are demonstrated. Ample time is devoted 
to all the courses offered in mathematics in order that the treat- 
ment of each may be as comprehensive and thorough as possible. 

Course X. Arithmetic. 

A complete review of the essentials of arithmetic including 
the fundamental processes, factoring, fractions, decimals, de- 
nominate numbers, longitude and time, practical measurements 
and percentage, together with the best methods of presenting 
these various subjects to pupils of the public schools. All ab- 
stract combinations are preceded, as far as possible, by con- 
structive effort and the work made objective. In the more 
advanced themes the subjects will be treated as they occur in 
actual business transactions regardless of text book limits. 

Course XI. Arithmetic. (Short Course) 

Industrial Arithmetic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon 
problems pertaining to the farm. The work will involve factors, 
fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, practical measure- 
ments and percentage. Problems dealing with such themes as 
the cost of buildings, marketing, measurements, insurance, taxes 
and banking will be taught in the most practical business-like 
fashion. Daily through the Winter Term. 

Course XII. Algebra. 

All elementary algebra is covered up to quadratic equations, 
especial emphasis being laid on the fundamental processes of addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplication and division. The relation of 
arithmetic to algebra is constantly kept in mind and the ad- 
vantages of algebra noted. 

Course XIII. Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

The first half of the year is devoted to the completion of alge- 
bra, which includes the study of quadratics, ratio, proportion 
and progressions, and also a complete review of the whole subject. 
Plane geometry is then taken up and the student is thoroughly 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 37 

grounded in the fundamental prniciples of the subject. Especial 
attention is paid to original exercises and problems in construc- 
tion, the object being to develop the student's ingenuity and 
reasoning powers. 

Course XIV. Plane Geometry. 

Geometry, inductive and deductive. Methods of reasoning; 
the classification of the various geometrical forms, lines, angles 
and surfaces and the various kinds of proofs. The relation of 
Geometry to Arithmetic. Especial emphasis on original and in- 
ventive work. The method of original demonstration through 
analysis, construction and proof. 

Course XV. Solid Geometry. 

One-half year is devoted to the completion of plane geometry 
and the second half year to solid geometry. In order that the 
latter subject may be more easily grasped and comprehended, 
geometrical solids are employed in the demonstration of each 
proposition, and the students are also required, from time to time, 
to fashion out of cardboard various solids for use in demonstrat- 
ing problems in construction. 



SCIENCE 

The courses are designed to instruct the student in the facts, 
laws and methods of nature. The intimate relation that applied 
science bears to every day life indicates the imperative need of such 
courses in a general scheme of education. 

The biological laboratory occupies a part of the third floor of 
Carnegie Hall. The room is 30 x 60 feet, well lighted, and provided 
with desk room and apparatus to accommodate forty pupils. 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters on the fourth floor of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room and 
apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 25x35 feet convenient- 
ly arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Carnegie 
Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and apparatus 
for thirty students working at one time. 



38 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Laboratory and field work in the sciences is always a welcome 
and profitable diversion from continued study and recitation in the 
class room. The laboratory and field work are carefully directed so 
that observation and inference may be comprehensive and accurate. 
The methods of instruction are those of modern laboratories for 
which the equipment is ample. 

The following courses are offered, four years of which are con- 
stants for graduation. 

Course XVI. Geography. 

A comprehensive and critical review of descriptive geography. 
The first half of the year is devoted to an extensive comparison of 
the topographical features, the commercial advantages, and the 
development of industries of the different countries of the earth. 

Course XVII. Physical Geography. 

The second half of the year is devoted to a study of the earth 
as a globe. Especial emphasis is laid upon the study of the con- 
stant changes apparent in the earth's surface, the various physical 
ages of the earth, the underlying causes, and the effect upon man- 
kind. As far as possible the most fundamental principles of this 
subject are brought out by actual observation in field work. 

Course XVIII. Agriculture A. 

Elementary. The study of the plant ; classes of plants ; im- 
portant farm crops; useful and harmful insects, birds ; weather and 
the farm; the soil; domestic animals of the farm; care for live 
stock. Fall and Winter Terms. 

Course XIX . Agriculture B . 

Five hours a week for the winter term. Designed to accom- 
modate young men from the farm who enter late in the Fall and 
leave early in the Spring. Lectures, recitations and experiments. 
Emphasis is laid upon kinds of soil; soil and water; how plants 
feed and grow; the selection and germination of seeds; require- 
ments in the growth of seedlings; conservation of moisture; soil 
fertility ; varieties of stock and stock breeding, etc. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 41 

Course XX. Agriculture C. 

A study of soils, their origin, physical properties, drainage 
and irrigation, etc.; farm crops, grouped and studied; animal 
husbandry; dairying. A comprehensive view of the subject. 
Daily throughout the year. 

Course XXI. Zoology. 

Five hours a week for the first half of the year. The course 
is designed as a foundation for advanced scientific work. Lec- 
tures and recitations cover the principle facts of animal structure 
and classification. Illustrations are given by means of museum 
specimens, wall charts, slides and stereopticon views. The 
student does individual laboratory work studying typical repre- 
sentatives of the main branches of the animal kingdom. Atten- 
tion is also given to the speculative questions of the science. 

Course XXII. Botany. 

Five hours a week for the last half of the year. The work 
covers seed germination, the structure, development and distribu- 
tion of plants together with a study of the types of various plant 
groups beginning with the simpler forms. Specimens of the 
higher form of plants are studied and classified in the laboratory. 
Especial attention is given to a study of the relation of the 
vegetable to the animal kingdom. 

Course XXIII. Physics. 

Five hours a week for the year. This course consists of lec- 
tures, experiments and recitations. The experiments are simple, 
yet full and exhaustive. Especial attention is given to the solu- 
tion of problems involving physical laws and formulae. A series 
of forty-eight experiments is prescribed and performed by 
students during the year and careful tabulations are made of the 
results. Especial attention is given to the fundamentals that 
lead up to the various courses in engineering. 

Course XXIV. General Chemistry. 

Five hours a week for six months. Three periods a week are 



42 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

devoted to the study of the laws, theories, formulae and funda- 
mental principles of chemistry and to the solution of problems in 
chemical arithmetic. Two double periods each week are devoted 
to laboratory work. Over one hundred experiments involving 
chemical change, affinity, valence, etc., are performed and noted 
so that the student both becomes familiar with the manipulation 
of apparatus and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

Course XXV. Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

Five double periods a week for three months are devoted to 
the analysis of some of the simpler solutions and solids. The 
work is done under the immediate supervision of the instructor. 
This course is designed to lead up to quantitative and food 
analysis. Prerequisite Course XXVI. 

Course XXVI. Qualitative Analysis. 

Daily throughout the Fall term. Designed especially for 
young women who are pursuing domestic science courses. The 
essential materials in a complete food ; the reactions that occur in 
their preparation for use ; the common adulterations ; the foods in 
which commonly found; how recognized; household tests, etc. 
Prerequisite courses XXVI, XXVII. 

Course XXVII. Bacteriology. 

Five hours a week for the Spring term. Arranged to meet 
the needs of domestic science students. Recitations and experi- 
ments. The yeast plant is studied in all the important details of 
its life habits. Especial attention is given to the moulds and bac- 
teria of the household. The life habits of the bacilli, their rela- 
tions to health and disease, the precautions that should be taken 
in preventing infection are dealt with extensively. 



EDUCATION 

Course XXVIII. Elementary Pedagogy. 

A brief course in the principles and methods of teaching and 
general school management offered to students who are unable to 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 43 

remain in school a sufficient length of time to complete a full 
course. This course includes a brief study of the presentative, 
representative and reflective powers; the ends of education; the 
means; the principles involved; general methods; methods in par- 
ticular branches, etc. 

Course XXIX. Psychology. 

The scope and importance of the subject; the mechanism at 
the disposal of the mind ; sense organis ; mind and brain ; the laws 
of mental development; the getting of knowledge and skill and 
the application of this knowledge in the art of teaching. Em- 
phasis is laid upon mental activity rather than upon mental 
structure and upon the significance of the initiative, constructive 
and executive powers in a scheme of education. 

Course XXX. History of Education. 

A study of the educational systems of the chief nations of 
antiquity; education in its relation to Christianity; the renais- 
sance, the reformation and the forces operative in our own era ; a 
study of the life and practices of the chief educational reformers in 
the light of prevailing theories. Numerous outside readings and 
class reviews are required. 

Course XXXI. Philosophy of Education. 

A study of the agencies of civilization ; the broad conception 
of education; the biological, physiological, sociological and psy- 
chological aspects of education. Especial attention is given to 
such themes as the Place of the Body in Education, the Influence 
of Body on Mind, Physical Education, Environment, Facial Ex- 
perience, and the Notion of Self- Activity. 

Course XXXII. Economics of Manual Training. 

Spring Term, two periods per week. The organization of 
manual training in public school courses, aim and practice, the 
history and literature of manual training ; equipment and supplies ; 
correlation; manual training and mental development; instruc- 
tion and control, etc. 



44 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course XXXIII. Reviews and Methods. 

The subject matter of arithmetic, grammar, history and 
geography reviewed; the principles and methods of teaching em- 
phasized. The work is especially designed to train students to 
teach. The subject matter, teacher's aim, method, preparation 
and presentation are carefully considered with special reference to 
the grades. 

Course XXXIV. Reviews and Methods. 

A continuation of the above course, Fall and Winter Terms. 

Course XXXV. Observation and Practice. 

Designed to train prospective teachers in the principles and 
methods of effective teaching. The opportunity for observation 
and practice teaching is found in the classes of the preparatory 
department, the department of manual training, and the de- 
partment of domestic science and arts. Both observation and 
practice take place under the direct supervision of a trained 
teacher, who is thoroughly capable not only of directing the 
efforts of pupil-teachers but of offering the most helpful and pains- 
taking criticism. 

Course XXXVI. Sociology. 

The origin, nature, elements and structure of society; evolu- 
tion ; clothing ; the arts of life ; the pleasures of life ; the family and 
tribal organization; law; evolution of institutions; laws of social 
progress. Emphasis is given primitive industries and their 
possible relation to the elementary school curriculum. 



LATIN 

The study of the Latin language has given character to modern 
minds by the habits of discrimination and analysis which it re- 
quires, and has largely contributed to the marked advancement 
of science and reasoning. To represent it as nothing but a criticism 
of words or an exercise of memory is utterly erroneous. It de- 
mands clearness of judgment and admits of operations even of 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 45 

fancy, picturing things of which words are but symbols, and tends 
to promote quickness and depth of comprehension. The analysis of 
language cultivates acuteness and pre-eminent literary taste, and 
inspires the student with a love of research. In Latin is found the 
strength, precision and order of the old Roman. Attention is 
given to correct writing, the study of idioms and synonyms, trans- 
lations into English and the history of its literature. Always 
the relation of the language to English is kept in mind and similari- 
ties noted. 

Course XXXVII. Latin I. 

The elements. Daily throughout the year. Careful study 
and practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections and syn* 
tax, a gaining of a working vocabulary. Translating of simple 
prose. Much time and emphasis is placed upon the translation of 
English into Latin. Word formation also receives considerable at- 
tention. 

Course XXXVIII. Latin II. 

Caesar. Daily throughout the year. Four books; transla- 
tion into clear idiomatic English ; construction of every word ; the 
life of Caesar ; the Roman government of his time ; the formation 
of the Roman army; sight reading; prose composition based upon 
the text of Caesar. 

Course XXXIX. Latin III. 

Cicero. Daily throughout the year. Six orations; four In 
Catalinam, De Imperio Pompei and Pro Archia; the Life of 
Cicero; the history of his time; Roman oratory; syntax of each 
word; sight reading; prose composition based on the text; memor- 
izing of especial passages of Pro Archia. 

Course XL. Latin IV. 

Vergil — Elective. Daily throughout the year. Six books of 
the Aeneid; syntax; grammatical peculiarities; translation into 
clear idiomatic English; occasional metrical translation; the life 
of Vergil ; the history of his times ; the mythology of the Aeneid 
the versification of the Aeneid. 



46 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



GERMAN 

The course is designed to enable the student to use this language 
with facility in ordinary reading, writing and speaking ; to supply the 
mental training only to be obtained by a study of language other 
than one's own ; to give the student a key to the riches of German 
literature. Accuracy and facility of translation are sought by means 
of a careful grammatical drill and a generous amount of reading. 
Composition forms a necessary part of the instruction. Especial 
emphasis is laid upon the acquiring of a correct pronunciation. The 
class is conducted in German. 

Course XLI. Elementary German. 

For beginners. Special attention is given to correct pro- 
nunciation, the principles of grammar, the conversion of simple 
prose from German into English and from English into German, 
and to conversation exercises. Joynes-Meissner's Grammar; 
Guerber's Maerchen und Erzaehlungen ; Hans Anderson's Bilder- 
buch ohne Bilder; Storm's Immensee. 

Course XLII. German Reading. 

Review of the grammar; practice in translating from German 
into idiomatic English; written exercises based on a text. Joy- 
nes-Meissner's Grammar; Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug; 
Heyse's L'Arrabiata; Storm's Germalhausen ; Benedix' Die 
Hochzeitreise ; Schiller's Der Nefie als Onkel, etc. 

Course XLIII. Classic German. 

Sudermann's Johannes; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; 
Goethe's Egmont ; Freytag's Die Journalisten, etc., etc. 



MECHANIC ARTS 

The work of this department is essentially practical, since it 
gives a knowledge of how to do things that are being done in this 
present age and day. The boy who can plan and build a house or a 
bam; forge a clevis; repair his father's plow or other farm imple- 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 47 

ment, has a knowledge that means dollars and cents to his imme- 
diate advantage. Although this work is practical, and intensely so, 
yet it is none the less educational, for it calls into action all the facul- 
ties of which it can be said that training is given them in school work 
of any kind, but especially it develops the powers of construction ; it 
is educational because it gives a more correct view of life, for with- 
out a fairly good knowledge of industrial work, there can be only an 
unbalanced and incorrect conception of society, for social condi- 
tions are very largely industrial conditions. 

The work of this department comprises four years' training in 
the use of the various tools and apparatus necessary in giving prac- 
tice in the principal processes of construction in wood and iron. 

Equipment. 

The mechanical drawing room is equipped with individual 
drawing cabinets, high grade instruments, mahogany ebony- 
lined T-squares, amber triangles, a 30-inch x 42-inch blue printing 
frame, and other necessary apparatus. 

The wood shops are equipped with double work benches, in- 
dividual sets of bench tools, a large assortment of tools for general 
use, a Fox trimmer, a mortiser, a tenoning machine, a band saw, 
twenty turning lathes, a universal saw table and a hand planer. 

The blacksmith shop is equipped with down-draft forges, an- 
vils, hammers, vises, bench tools, etc. 

The foundry is equipped with cupola and brass furnaces for 
melting and shovels, riddles, rammers, bellows, trowels, slicks, 
lifters, gate cutters, etc. 

The machine shop is equipped with sixteen engine lathes, a 
shaper, a wet grinder, a universal milling machine, a planer, drill 
presses, a universal grinder, an oil blast forge for tempering tools, 
besides a full equipment of small tools. 

Course XLIV. Joinery. 

(a) Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saws, planes, rilister, 
chisels, hammer, square, marking gauge, bevel, boring bits and 
other hand tools, in the construction of the principal joints em- 
ployed in carpentry and joinery. 



48 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(b) When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful 
articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

(<:) Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a 
desk, table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order 
that they may make further application of the principles they 
have learned. 

Course XLV. Carpentry. 

Care and use of tools; forms of joints employed in making 
articles for home and farm use; timber splices used in the con- 
struction of buildings ; stair and rafter cutting ; the construction of 
a model of the whole or part of a building. Daily throughout the 
Winter Term. 

Course XL VI. Turnery. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow, chuck and template turning, including exercises 
through which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, con- 
cave curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turn- 
ing, together with exercises combining either a number, or all of 
these operations; (b) useful articles in which the principles learned 
in (a) are applied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for 
various tools, a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair 
balusters and various other articles of utility. This work is car- 
ried further in its application in pattern marking. 



Course XL VII. Forging. 

(a) Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming 
angles from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various 
forms of welding iron and mild steel, (b) This course includes a 
number of useful articles, including a bracket, a brace, a shackle, 
swivel, tongs, hook and chain, clevis, cold chisel, heading tool, 
bolts, cape-chisel, punch and hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work in making and 
tempering machine tools. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 51 

Course XLVIII. Blacksmithing. 

Care of the forge fire ; drawing, bending, upsetting, swaging, 
and the different forms of welding of iron and steel ; the tempering 
of steel; the application of the foregoing processes in the making 
of articles for farm use such as hooks, chains, ring-bolt, clevises, 
irons for neck-yoke, whifnetrees, etc., cold chisels, punches, cape 
chisels, hammers and tongs; the equipment of a serviceable black- 
smithing outfit. This course also includes a number of exercises 
in soldering and brazing, designed to give the student a knowledge 
of these arts sufficient to enable him to make ordinary repairs. 
Daily throughout the Winter Term. 

Course XLIX. Pattern Making. 

Pattern Making is taught in connection with the Foundry, 
and preceding Foundry Practice and is taken up in the following 
order. 

(a) Study of materials from which potterns are made and 
the selection of material, determined from use of patterns; 
methods of building up stock to prevent warping, and making of 
glue joints; selection and application of pattern varnishes; use of 
ribs, gaggers, chaplets and templates, covered by lectures. 

(b) Construction of simple patterns, having draft one way, 
with proper allowances for shrinkage, draft and finish; green sand 
cores. 

(c) Construction of more difficult patterns, such as patterns 
for pipe fittings and machine parts, requiring baked cores; core 
prints, and core boxes; pattern boards, match plates and oddsides 

Course L. Foundry Practice. 

The course in Foundry Practice is supplementary to the 
course in Pattern Making. Castings are here made from the 
patterns constructed in Course XLIX in plaster, brass, aluminum 
and cast iron. The products in brass, aluminum and cast iron 
are used in Courses LI and LII. 

Course LI. Chipping and Filing. 

(a) Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill 
in the use of the file and the cold-chisel. These tools are of es- 
pecial value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for in- 
stance, in the erecting or repairing of machinery, whether in the 
shop or on the farm. Their usefulness is so well known, and 



52 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

the inability of the average man properly to use them is also so 
well known, that it seems proper to give them especial attention in 
this course. 

(b) In connection with and in addition to the above a num- 
ber of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 

Course LII. Machine Shop Practice. 

(a) Machine tool making. Students make and temper the 
tools which they will use in Machine Tool Practice. 

(b) Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms 
of machine tools, directions for operating and keeping tools in 
order; practice in centering and in plane, taper, and template 
turning, chucking, drilling, boring, external and internal thread 
cutting; hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

(c) Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, mill- 
ing machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard guages, mi- 
crometer, and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, 
taps and dies, machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. 
In this course the machine work is done on the articles cast in 
the foundry during the preceding year. The greater share of the 
machine tool practice of the entire course consists in machining 
the products of the foundry. 

(d) Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, 
a lathe, or some other project involving similar operations. 

Course LIII. Mechanical Drawing — First Year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Instrumental drawing. Proper care and use of in- 
struments, with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

(c) Geometriacl drawing. A knowledge of geometric 
terms, also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in 
mechanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of con- 
struction. 

(d) Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of 
the planes of projection. This work, which is part of descriptive 
geometry, is the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. 
In connection with it students are required to bring to class shop 
sketches or freehand working drawings of the various articles. 
Instrumental drawings are made from some of these sketches. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 53 

Course LIV. Mechanical Drawing — Second Year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Constructive design, (i) Freehand working draw- 
ings, properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental draw- 
ings, made to scale, from sketches in (a) . 

(c) ISOTHEMETRIC AND CABINET PERSPECTIVE. Practical 

problems. 

Course LV. Mechanical Drawing — Third Year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(6) Descriptive geometry. Graphical methods of solving 
problems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application 
in sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns 
of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All articles 
in this course, of which patterns are made, are constructed either 
of metal or paper. 

(c) Architectural drawing. Original plans for a two- 
story frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is made 
very practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the 
floor, the basement and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sec- 
tional wall views showing the construction ; and at least two views 
of the completed structure — the drawings including roof plan and 
longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are drawn up and 
an estimate of the cost of building materials and labor is made. 
Tracings and blue prints are made of the complete set of plans. 
Special students are carrying this work further and are actually 
building models in the shop at the scale of two inches to the foot, 
in which the methods of construction are identical with those 
used in actual house building. 

Course LVI. Mechanical Drawing — Fourth Year. (3 hrs. per week) 

(a) Lettering and Conventional Representations of fre- 
quently recurring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, 
fastenings, etc. 

(6) Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in 
projection of complete machines of detailed parts, with correct 
dimensions supplied from measurements. Sketches to be neat 
and clear, and dimensions properly placed. 



54 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(c) Working drawings from sketches. Finished work- 
ing drawing from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings 
to be inked, others to be traced, and from the tracings blue prints 
made. 

(d) Machine design. Students to make original design of 
mechanical appliance or machine. 



MANUAL TRAINING FOR TEACHERS 

The State Normal-Industrial School lays special emphasis upon 
Manual Training. In breadth of courses, comprehensiveness of 
equipment and thoroughness of instruction it is not approached 
by any other school in the state. Prospective students and par- 
ents are invited to visit our shops and classes at any time. 

The following outlines indicate the purpose and scope of the 
work offered for teachers, which includes Hand Work for Primary, 
Intermediate and Grammar Grades; Woodwork, Metal Work and 
Mechanical Drawing for Secondary Schools ; Tinsmithing, Freehand 
Drawing, Design and Professional Work. 

Course LVII. Hand-Work for the Primary Grades. 

(i) Paper and cardboard construction. This work is 
is taken up as it should be presented in the public schools. The 
different steps in paper folding are given, developing into the 
construction of familiar articles. The use of paste and scissors is 
developed early in the course. Freehand cutting is given for 
training the eye in regard to form and for composition. Port- 
folios, booklets, boxes, etc., are constructed of heavy paper and 
cardboard. 

(2) Clay modeling and pottery. Some training is given in 
modeling type forms from simple objects in nature. The greater 
share of the time is devoted to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces 
involving different methods of construction. In the third and 
fourth grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class is 
instructed in the craft of mould made pieces and a few pieces 
are made by the class. Students glaze a part of their work. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 55 

(3) Weaving and basketry. Weaving begins with the use 
of paper mats, different patterns being worked out in several 
media. The materials included are raffiia, jute, common woolen 
yarns and, for the fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of the finest 
quality. Problems include pencil bags, book bags, holders, 
mats, special designed rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. Basket- 
ry consists of the problems used in elementary grades, simple 
rattan mats and baskets, handles, hinges, etc. Coiled mats and 
simple baskets are executed and a few methods of using raffia and 
constructive work are illustrated. 

(4) Thin wood construction. The assembling of thin 
pieces of wood by means of glue and brads to form miniature 
pieces of furniture; the construction of a miniature house. The 
work consists, in part, of a combination of wood and cardboard. 

Course LVIII. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 

(1) Woodwork for fourth and fifth grades. The pur- 
pose here is to train the prospective teacher in the simpler process- 
es in wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction 
intended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, 
they are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, 
for original design. The work is similar in character to courses 
offered in the elementary grades of any first class public school 
system. The tools used are the knife, block plane, back saw, 
coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, 
hammer, rule and pencil. For most of the exercises the material 
is prepared in thickness before given to the student. Workman- 
like methods are aimed at ; blue prints of the course are made. 

(2) Woodwork for the sixth, seventh and eighth 
grades. Here serious attention is first given to following the 
methods of the skilled mechanic. It is the aim to keep always in 
mind the interest and capacity of the pupils to be taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the 
public schools where there is an equipment of workbenches and a 
rather full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth grades there 
are numerous exercises in cabinet making in which the simpler 
methods of joinery are involved. The use of sandpaper, filler, 
stains and varnish is introduced in finishing some of the pieces. 



56 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course LIX. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full 
^Mechanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive ex- 
ercises in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construction, 
Wood Carving, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and Design. 

(i) Joinery. 

(a) Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saws, planes, filister, 
chisels, hammer, square, marking gauge, bevel, boring bits and 
other hand tools, in the construction of the principal joints em- 
ployed in carpentry and joinery. 

(6) When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful 
articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

(c) Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a 
desk, table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order 
that they may make further application of the principles they 
have learned. 

(d) Advanced cabinet making; practice in the application of 
the principles of Joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, 
settees, stands, pedestals and cabinets of various designs. Pieces 
to be finished in approved manner. 

(2) Turnery. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises 
through which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, concave 
curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turning, to- 
gether with exercises combining either a number, or all, of these 
operations, (b) Useful articles in which the principles learned in 
(a) are applied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for 
various tools, a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair 
balusters and various other useful articles. This work is carried 
further in its application in pattern marking. 

(3) Forging. 

(a) Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming angles 

*Certain Mechanic Arts Courses are here repeated in order that the 
prospective teacher may understand the details of the full Manual Training 
Course. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 57 

from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms of weld- 
ing iron and mild steel. 

(b) This course includes a number of useful articles, includ- 
ing a bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, 
clevis, cold chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and 
hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making and 
tempering machine tools. 

(4) TlNSMITHING. 

The course in tinsmithing is supplementary to a part of the 
course in drawing and is to give practice in cutting and making 
proper allowances for lap and so forth. Sufficient practice is 
given in soldering to enable the student to execute all ordinary 
work that can be done with simple equipment, such as repairing 
tin and copper vessels. 

(5) Hammered metal work. 

This course offers instruction in the manipulation of sheet 
metal The work is carried out with copper and brass ; silver may 
be used at the student's expense Attention is directed to the 
different processes of the work, such as hammering, repousse, 
sawing, filing, stamping, riveting, soldering and etching. The 
problems include the forming of bowls, trays, plates, desk sets, 
candlesticks, ink wells and so forth. 

(6) Pattern making. 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given 
to the work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made 
of a number of models which involve the more elementary prob- 
lems in foundry practice ; these are followed by patterns of parts 
of machines, including a hand- wheel and blanks for a cam, gear- 
wheel and bevel-gear. 

(7) Chipping and filing. 

(a) Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill in 
the use of the file and the cold-chisel These tools are of especial 
value in almost every line of mechanical work, as for instance, in 
erecting or repairing machinery whether in the shop or on the farm. 
Their usefulness is so well known, and the inability of the aver- 
age man to use them properly is also so well known, that it seems 
proper to give them especial attention in this course. 



58 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(b) In connection with and in addition to the above a number 
of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 
(8) Machine shop practice. 

(a) Machine tool making. Students make and temper the 
tools which they will use in their Machine Tool Practice, 

(b) Machine tool work. Explanation of the different 
forms of machine tools, directions for operating machines and 
keeping tools in order; practice in centering and in plain, taper, 
and template turning, chucking, drilling, boring, external and in- 
ternal thread cutting ; hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

(c) Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, 
milling machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard guages, 
micrometer and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, 
taps and dies, machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In 
this course the machine work is done on the articles cast in the 
foundry during the preceding year. The greater share of the 
machine tool practice of the entire course consists in machining 
the products of the foundry. 

(d) Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, 
a lathe, or some other project involving similar operations. 

Course LX. Drawing and Design. 

(i) Manual training design. Study of the elements of 
design, line, dark and light and color and the application of the 
principles of harmony. The object of the instruction is to de- 
velop appreciation through the study of art-structure. The 
course begins with design in the abstract, harmonious arrange- 
ment of spaces being given special attention. Application of the 
theory of design in technical problems; designs for furniture; 
textiles, wall coverings, stained glass, interiors, etc. Problems 
worked out in the shop. 

(2) Mechanical drawing — first year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of in- 
struments, with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

(c) Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in 
mechanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of con- 
struction. 




Paper Patterns 




Dressmaking 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 61 

(d) Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of 
planes in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive 
geometry, is the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. 
In connection with it students are required to bring to class shop- 
sketches or freehand working drawings of various articles. In- 
strumental drawings are made from some of these sketches. 

(3) Mechanical drawing — second year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings r 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental draw- 
ings, made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

(c) Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems, 

(4) Mechanical drawing — third year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(6) Descriptive geometry. Graphical methods of solving 
problems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application 
in sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns 
of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All articles 
in this course, of which patterns are made, are constructed either 
of metal or paper. 

(c) Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two- 
story frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is 
made very practical. After the rough sketches have been made,, 
the floor, basement and footing plans are drawn to scale, also 
sectional wall views showing the construction; and at least two 
views of the completed structure — the drawings including roof 
plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are 
drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building materials and 
labor is made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the com- 
plete set of plans. Special students are carrying this work further 
and are actually building models in the shop, in which the methods 
of construction are identical with those used in actual house build- 
ing. 

(5) Mechanical drawing — fourth year. (3 hours per week) 

(a) Lettering and conventional representations of frequent- 
ly recurring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, 
etc. 

(6) Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in pro- 



62 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

jection of complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct 
dimensions supplied from measurements. Sketches to be neat 
and clear and dimensions properly placed. 

(c) Working drawings from sketches. Finished working 
drawing from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings to 
be inked, others to be traced and from the tracings blue prints 
made. 

(d) Machine design. Students to make original design of 
mechanical appliance or machine. 

DOMESTIC ARTS AND SCIENCE 

The course is designed to afford instruction in the subjects 
which pertain to life in the home. The training to be obtained 
through motor activity is regarded as one of the principal education- 
al functions of both domestic science and art; the sociological and 
ethical value of such work is emphasized. 

The department occupies the entire Home Economics Build- 
ing with sewing rooms, kitchen, dining and recitation room and 
fitting room. 

The sewing rooms are large, well lighted and commodious. 
They are equipped with sewing machines, lockers, charts, cutting 
tables, individual tables, dress forms and wall cases for the purpose 
of exhibiting the work, etc. The best fashion magazines are re 
ceived regularly. 

The kitchen is supplied vvith desks for individual work, 
equipped with all the necessary cooking utensils; gas stoves for in- 
dividual use; gas range; wood range; refrigerator; cupboards; kitch- 
en cabinet ; sink, and the cooking utensils necessary to provide the 
best facilities for class work. 

The dining room is equipped with dining table, dining chairs, 
china closet, buffet, etc. It is also supplied with china, silver, linen 
etc. 

The recitation room is supplied with reference books, charts and 
magazines devoted to the subject of domestic science. 

Course LXI. Plain Sewing. 

A beginning course in sewing. Elements of plain and fancy 
hand sewing. Use and care of sewing machines. Each student is 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 63 

expected to complete a four-piece suit of cotton underwear, one 
tailored shirtwaist, one fancy cotton waist and one simple cotton 
dress. Students draft all their own patterns to exact measures. 
Students are required to provide themselves with Snow's Success 
Drafting System. 

At odd tines during the year students have opportunity to 
acquire a practical working knowledge of household sewing, in- 
cluding towels, pillow cases and table linen, etc. Students fur- 
nish all their own materials. 

Course LXII. Dressmaking A. 

Advanced Course in Sewing. A thorough study in founda- 
tion pattern drafting. Practice in designing patterns of any 
desired style. Several weeks are given over entirely to pat- 
tern making and designing. 

Each student is required to make at least one fancy woolen or 
silk waist, one tailored skirt, one woolen dress and one fancy cot- 
ton dress. Students are required to furnish all tneir own ma- 
terials. 

Course LXIII. Dressmaking. 

A half-day daily throughout the winter term. Instruction is 
given in : 

(1) Hand sewing. Making of simple garments by hand to 
illustrate the use of plain and fancy stitches. 

(2) Dressmaking. Cutting, fitting and making of waists and 
dresses; thorough drill in pattern drafting and dressmaking; 
choice and suitability of dress materials; color and color combi- 
nations. While the degree of skill acquired depends upon the 
individual, a pupil of average ability should be able to master the 
elements of dressmaking by diligent application during the term. 
Open only to short course students. 

Course LXIV. Domestic Art Design. 

The elements of design; line, light, shade, color; principles of 
harmony; the appreciation of structure. The course, in part, is 
devoted to the application of the theory of design to technical 
problems such as designs for basketry, rugs, wall decoration, 



64 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

textiles, stenciling, etc. Required in Normal Courses. In con- 
junction with Course LVII; Sections 1,2,3. 

Course LXV. Applied Design. 

The elements of design applied in construction and surface 
decoration. The instruction follows two lines: a study of the 
principles of design in the abstract, color theory being given 
special attention, and the application of the principles in technical 
problems such as art needle-work, applique pillows, table runners, 
designs for embroidered shirt waists, towels, belts, etc. Required 
in Industrial Courses. 

Course LXVL Domestic Science A. 

An elementary course in cookery. Classification of foods. 
Scientific principles underlying the cooking and digestion of each 
class of foods. 

Laboratory practice in cooking, table setting and serving. 
Three two-hour periods in laboratory, and two one-hour recitation 
periods each week throughout the year. This course must be ac- 
companied or preceded by a course in chemistry. 

Course LXVII. Domestic Science B. 

Cookery. Daily throughout the winter term. A study of 
the underlying principles of cooking. Daily practice in cooking, 
table setting, serving and buying. Open to short course students. 

Course LXVIII. Advanced Cooking. 

Food preservation — canning, preserving, jelly making and 
pickling. Fancy cookery. A brief study of food values. Use of 
carbohydrate fats, proteids, mineral matter and water in the 
body. Invalid diet and preparation of trays suitable for special 
diseases. 

Lectures and recitations on Home Nursing. 

Daily throughout first semester. This course is accompanied 
by a course in Bacteriology. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 65 

Course LXIX. Home Economics. 

Investigation into household problems. Location of house, 
heating, lighting, ventilating. Elementary housekeeping and fur- 
nishing. Open only to students who have completed courses in 
Elementary and Advanced Cooking. 

Course LXX. Teachers' Training Course. 

This course is planned to prepare students to teach either 
Domestic Science or Domestic Art. 

It includes: Cost and choice of equipments, courses of 
study, lesson plans, running expenses, practice teaching, and 
individual criticism. 

Open only to senior students who are completing the Five 
Year's Course in Domestic Science. Two periods a week during 
second semester. 

Course LXXI. Mechanical Drawing. 

The purpose of this course is to give sufficient knowledge of 
mechanical drawing and methods of construction to enable girls 
to plan and make working drawings of household articles, 
cabinets and furniture; also to plan and make drawings of a frame 
cottage. 



DRAWING AND FINE ARTS 

The department offers thorough instruction in fine and decora- 
tive arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the second floor of 
Carnegie Hall, and there is an ample equipment of casts and studio 
furnishings. The department aims to give thorough instruction 
in the principles of drawing and painting; to enlarge the student's 
acquaintance with what is best in art ; to offer courses of instruction 
adapted to the needs of teachers in the public schools and super- 
visors of art instruction in city schools. With serious study a high 
degree of efficiency and technical knowledge may be attained here 
at a much less expense than would be incurred for similar instruc- 
tion in a large city. 



66 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course LXXII. Fine Arts. 

A general course in appreciation and combining the essentials 
in drawing, painting and composition. A study of form using 
different media — charcoal, pencil, water color and oil. Still life 
and flower painting in water color. Study of composition by 
using flowers and landscapes. Figure sketching, advanced com- 
position and illustration in charcoal and water color. 

Course LXXIII. Normal Art. 

Study of form by use of charcoal, pencil and color; color 
theory; hue, intensity and textile values; relation of comple- 
mentary colors, etc.; simple design problems based on public 
school work, illustrating the uses of the elements and principles of 
design. Landscape in black and white, study of values working 
from black and white up to five and seven tones ; figure sketching ; 
illustrating. 

Course LXXIV. Metal Work. 

The problems given are considered in relation to each other 
in order to develop a general knowledge of sheet metal work. 
Processes include forming, sawing, filing and building by hard and 
soft soldering, riveting, etc., together with the study of the 
processes of repousee, etching and coloring. 

Course LXXV. Pottery. 

The course begins with the building of hand-made pieces ot 
different sizes and shapes; the making of tiles together with deco- 
ration by relief and incised lines; building of pilaster models; 
casting of moulds and pouring and finishing of mould-made 
pieces. Students glaze and fire a part of their work. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

Six large pleasant rooms on the third floor of Carnegie Hall are 
set apart for this department. The school owns eight? ianos which 
are supplemented by rented ones for the use of students who are un- 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 67 

able to practice at home. Students take weekly lessons and prac- 
tice two periods — one and one-half hours — per day. Second year 
students doing creditable work are given opportunity to participate 
in public recitals, two or more of which are held each year. The 
following course is subject to change and substitution: 

Course LXXVL Preparatory. 

Course in hand culture; major scales; Byer's method for 
beginners, or Czerny Op. 599. 

Course LXXVII. First Year. 

Elementary technic; Loeschern Op. 65; Lichner Sonatinas, 
album of instructive and interesting pieces. 

Course LXXVIII. Second Year. 

Elementary technic continued; Loeschern Op. 66; Heller 
Op. 47; albums of instructive and interesting pieces by the best 
composers. 

Course LXXIX. Junior Year. 

Plaidy Technical Studies; Cramer Octave Studies; Heller 
Op. 47; Czerny School of Velocity Op. 299; Haydn and Mozart 
Sonatas. Selections from Schumann, Grieg, Heller, Nevin and 
others. 

Course LXXX. Senior Year. 

Advanced technical work continued ; Cramer Studies ; Mozart 
and Beethoven Sonatas; Selections from Chopin, Schumann, 
Bach, Liszt, Rubenstein and other modern and classical com- 
posers. 



VOCAL MUSIC 

The course in vocal music is designed to afford a thorough and 
comprehensive training in the elements; to secure accuracy and 
rapidity in sight reading and singing; to develop a taste for the 



68 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

best grades of music, and to prepare students to teach the subject 
systematically in all grades of the public schools. 

Course LXXXI. Public School Music. 

Designed to enable students to teach such principles of 
music as will apply in the several grades of the public schools. 
Instruction is given in time, tune, technique and the aesthetics of 
music. These subjects are exemplified in practice. Emphasis 
is laid upon the elements, theory of scale formation, melodic con- 
struction, elements of notation and harmony. The student be- 
comes thoroughly familiar with the best in grade music. Daily 
throughout the year. 

Course LXXXII. Choral Singing. 

Daily chorus practice for a brief period is given the entire 
school. This class is made up of the entire body of students and 
attendance is compulsory. Constant practice is had on such 
compositions as lie within the range and understanding of the 
pupils. Daily throughout the year. 



COMMERCIAL ARTS 

We live in a great commercial country and there is today a 
rapidly increasing demand for trained men and women. Book- 
keepers, Stenographers, Typewriters, Clerks and Office Assistants 
.are needed in every avenue of business. The time required to fit 
one's self in these lines is so comparatively short that any young 
man or young woman can afford to avail himself or herself of the 
opportunity. One drawback has been the expense. Few young 
:men and women feel that they can afford the excessive fees charged 
by the numerous business schools. Such schools are organized as a 
business venture; they offer instruction in but a few branches and 
have no other means of support. Living expenses are high and the 
tuition for the various courses often seems excessive. The State 
Normal-Industrial School is located in a school town; living ex- 
penses are reasonable; there is no tuition; the courses are thorough, 
practical and comprehensive. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 69 

Business Course 

Bookkeeping Business Forms 

Business Arithmetic Penmanship 

Spelling Correspondence 

Commercial Law Mimeographing 

Commercial Geography Rapid Calculation 

Course LXXXIII. Spelling. 

Spelling is made one of the important subjects. Work is 
given in both written and oral spelling. The class is carefully 
drilled in pronounciation and in the marking and defining of word 
drilled in pronounciation and in the marking and defining of 
words. A text -book is used. 

Course LXXXIV. Penmanship. 

Students are taught the plain, rapid and legible style of pen- 
manship which the business world demands. Instruction is given 
regarding position of body, hand, pen, paper, movements and best 
letter forms. 

Course LXXXV. Bookkeeping. 

The forms used in this course are those of the largest best 
known and most progressive business firms in our cities. The 
student begins with double entry, learning to journalize, post, take 
a trial balance, close the ledger and make a balance sheet and 
statement of the personal accounts. He then begins with single 
entry, learns to change the books from double to single entry and 
vice versa, and becomes familiar with the day book, journal, cash 
book and special ruled journals and cash books. He is trained in 
the use of partnership sets, special ruled books, bill books, invoice 
books, sales books, retailing, wholesaling, and during the latter 
part of the course the time is devoted to the lumber business, 
banking and the building and loan business. Careful instruction 
is given in writing commercial papers and business forms. 

Course LXXXVI. Commercial Arithmetic. 

A thorough review of the entire subject with special reference 
to the needs of accountants. Fractions, decimals, denominate 



70 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

numbers, percentage, interest, partial payments, stocks, insur- 
ance, etc., are reviewed and business methods and rapid calcu- 
lation given special attention. 

Course LXXXVII. Commercial Geography. 

The instruction in commercial geography covers the natural 
and industrial resources of all important countries, the routes and 
means of communication, imports and exports, the consular ser- 
vice, etc. 

Course LXXXVIII . Commercial Law. 

The student is taught that every person is amenable to the 
law and entitled to its protection, and that he should have a rea- 
sonable knowledge of it in so far as it may apply to contracts, 
agencies, partnerships, sale of goods, bailments, negotiable instru- 
ments, interest, usury, transportation, guarantee, surety, cor- 
portaions, joint stock companies, insurance, real estate, etc., and a 
wholesome regard for its enforcement. 



STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING 



Course LXXXIX. Shorthand. 

Students desiring to pursue this subject should enroll at the 
beginning of the school year. This course embraces a thorough 
drill in combining the signs into words, phrases and sentences, 
drills for speed, practice in transcribing notes, class and office 
dictation, and in the training necessary for the amanuensis and 
reporter. The Pitman system of shorthand is taught together 
with such improvements as have stood the test of the most severe 
requirements of the reporter's art. The debating clubs, chapel 
exercises and the routine of the county court, when in session, 
furnish excellent opportunity for practice. A phonograph is used 
for advanced dictation. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 71 

Course XC. Typewriting. 

"Touch" typewriting: That is, the student does not depend 
on watching a lettered keyboard, but operates the machine per- 
fectly, because he has a thorough knowledge of the position of ev- 
ery key, thereby gaining speed and accuracy and lessening the 
strain upon himself. He is required to become proficient in trans- 
cribing his shorthand notes, in copying, stenciling, and be able to 
take dictation from the teacher or from the phonograph. When 
competent, he has actual business practice. The president's 
office, the faculty and the different organizations of the school sup- 
ply this department with different kinds of work. 



STEAM ENGINEERING 



The aim of this department is to give a sound theoretical and 
practical training to young men who seek to prepare themselves to 
become steam engineers, firemen, steam fitters, etc. The courses 
are especially designed for those interested in automobiles, steam or 
gas engineering apparatus of any kind. 

Equipment. Excellent facilities are supplied for experi- 
mental work in steam engineering. Well equipped wood, iron 
shops and draughting room are at the disposal of students together 
with ample apparatus for theoretical and practical demonstra- 
tions. Among other special apparatus are included a Case trac- 
tion engine; a twenty-horse power horizontal side-crank Howell 
engine; McVicar twenty-horse power gas engine; International 
Harvester Co.'s four-horse power portable gas engine; Gaar-Scott 
Co.'s dismounted traction engine; Crosby steam indicators; 
Crosby gas engine indicator; Parr fuel calorimeter; Junker gas 
calorimeter; Carpenter separating calorimeter; Carpenter throt- 
tling calorimeter; Orsat apparatus for flue gas analysis; Hempel 
apparatus for gas analysis; Crosby steam gauge tester; Derry- 
Collard valve card apparatus; viscometer; assayer's balances; 
thermometers; manometers; Prony brakes; platform Fairbanks' 
scales; wheelborrow scales; steam pumps, injectors, etc. 



72 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course XCI. Engines. 

A study of the different types of steam engines, single, double, 
simple and compound, advantages and disadvantages of each. 
The steam valve, its motion and the different mechanisms by 
which the motion is obtained. 

(a) Appliances. A thorough study of the hydrostatic 
and mechanical methods ot supplying lubrication. The indi- 
cator as a means of studying pressure, correct valve setting, the 
construction and application of the Prony brake, tests for both 
indicated and brake horse-power. 

(b) Speed regulating device. The study of the differ- 
ent forms of governors, weights, springs and dash-pots. The 
application of certain forms of governors to certain kinds of 
engines. Engine practice. 

Course XCII. Boilers. 

The study of the more common types of boilers, safety de- 
vices, feed pumps, feed water heaters and injectors, boiler testing, 
boiler repairs and boiler compounds, furnaces, grates, stokers 
and ask handling machinery. Boiler practice. . 

Course XCIII. Gas Engines. 

Gas engine principles, types and regulating devices; methods 
of ignition. In this course special attention will be given to the 
adjustment of working parts supplemented by talks on gas 
engine fuels and their manufacture. Gas Engine practice. 

Course XCIV. Power Transmission. 

The various methods employed in the transmission of power 
and the application of the more common types; shaftings and 
bearings ; babbitting ; couplings ; pulleys ; tooth and friction gears ; 
clutches; rope and chain drives; belts and belting; splicing and 
lacing ; practical problems in figuring the size and speed of pulleys 
for required conditions of work, belt slippage and preventatives. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



73 



MILITARY SCIENCE 




By an Act of the Legislature the State Normal-Industrial School 
is required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military 
Science and the company organized and drilled is subject to regular 
inspection by the Adjutant General of the State. In harmony with 
this provision young men are drilled regularly in the schools of the 
soldier, squad, platoon, company, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(i) Organization. The cadet battalion at present compris- 
es, with the Commandant, one cadet Captain, one cadet First 
Lieutenant, one cadet Second Lieutenant, five Sergeants, one 
color Sergeant, six Corporals and one Artificer and cadets. A 
single permanent company is maintained under the name of Com- 
pany A. 



74 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(2) Equipment. The State Normal-Industrial School is sup 
plied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutrements; Winder 
target rifles; United States regulation sabers and belts for cadet 
officers; silk battalion flag, United States regulation; ammunition, 
consisting of cartridges for target practice and blank cartridges 
for use in volley firing and skirmish drill, and rifle range. 

(3) Appointments and promotions. The officers and non- 
co n missioned officers are selected from among those cadets who 
have been most studious, soldier-like and faithful in the per- 
formance of their duties and who have been most exemplary in 
their deportment. The Commandant and the Commissioned 
Officers constitute the Board of Examiners for the appointment 
and promotion of privates and non-commissioned officers. 

(4) Military Diploma. Commissions and warrants are is- 
sued to the commissioned and non-commissioned officers who are 
duly examined and deemed worthy of promotion provided, how- 
ever, that they have drilled at least one term as officers, have been 
promoted to higher rank, have received an average of not less than 
70% and have participated in at least one annual military contest. 

(5) Uniform. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn by 
all cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in courses 
requiring attendance for more than a single term. This uniform 
consists of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray color, modeled 
after the United States Military Academy uniform and is made in 
two qualities costing, respectively, $10.85 and $12.85. The uni- 
form is tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, durable and 
economical a suit as the student can obtain for this amount. It 
may be purchased at the school, at actual cost, or elsewhere as the 
student elects. Uniforms and gloves are worn at all regular drills 
and inspections. 

(6) Attendance. Six terms of military drill is required of 
all boys, unless excused on account of physical disability. A 
physician's certificate must accompany such excuse. The stand- 
ing of each cadet is averaged at the close of each term. The chief 
items considered in determining the grade are attendance, deport- 
ment and drill. Only those cadets whose average is above 70% 
for the six terms will be exempt from attendance. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 75 

(7) Annual military contest and prizes. An annual nili- 
tary contest is held at the close of the Winter Ter n. There are 
four events: Company Drill and Inspection; Officers' Saber 
Drill; Squad Drill; Individual Contest Drill. For each drill at 
the annual military contest there are three judges selected by the 
President and Commandant. The squad receiving the highest 
percentage in contest drill is presented with a silk ribbon, suitably 
inscribed, which is attached to the battalion colors and the 
members of the squad receive honorable mention in the catalogue. 
The prize for the best drilled man in the individual contest is a 
silver medal, for the second best drilled cadet a bronze medal, and 
each receives honorable mention. The individual contest is open 
to all members of the battalion. All cadets who take part in the 
annual military contest must appear in full regulation uniform. 

In the contest of 1911, Joseph Boyd was awarded the silver 
medal and Howard Morrison the bronze medal. The first squad, 
winner in the squad contest, was composed of Second Lieutenant 
Arthur Lawhead (commanding) and cadets Walter Jackson, 
Jack Grove, William White, James Vandanacker, Henry Wirch, 
Francis Abraham, Linville Townsend and Howard Morrison. 

Course XCV. Military Science 

Two periods per week for six terms; 6 points credit. 

Theoretical and practical instruction in infantry regulations; 
manual of arms; school of the company and squad drill, bayonet 
exercises; saber drill; guard duty; small arm firing; battalion pa- 
rade; reviews, etc. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The primary purpose of the State Normal- Industrial School 
is the harmonious development of the entire boy or girl. Athletics 
and sports have a place in the development of every normal person 
and receive proper encouragement and supervision. Physical 
training is compulsory; two periods per week for six terms. Each 
student, before entering the gymnasium, is given a physical ex- 
amination. The condition of heart, lungs, digestion, nervous and 



76 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

muscular system, carriage, etc., is noted and indicated on a chart. 
This enables the instructor to prescribe special exercises for individu- 
al needs. Each student must be provided with a light gymnasium 
suit of prescribed pattern. There is a fee of fifty cents a year. 

Course XCVI. Physical Training. 

(a) For young men. Two periods per week for six terms; 
6 points credit. 

Regular systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnastics, 
both with and without apparatus; free-hand exercises; sports. 
Foot ball, basketball, baseball, and tennis are available in season. 

(6) For young women. Two periods per week for six terms ; 
6 points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises 
are similar to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bell and barbell 
training, club swinging, marching, running, exercises with light 
apparatus, etc. Basketball is given a fair share of the time. 



General Information 



LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The plant of the State Normal- Industrial School consists 

of four main buildings and a power plant and engine laboratory. 

•» 

I. Carnegie Hall. 

This is a four-story pressed brick structure, beautiful and 
commodious. In it are found the Departments of Science, Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental 
Music and the Library. In each department the equipment is 
such that students may reap the most generous returns from their 
efforts. Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Physiography are 
taught in laboratories in the most approved manner; the Depart- 
ment of English has access to abundant literature, the Commercial 
Department is provided with typewriters, duplicators, Edison 
dictation phonograph records, etc.; the Department of Music owns 
eight high grade pianos and supplements these with rented in- 
struments; the Department of Fine Arts is equipped with easels, 
drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, lockers, kiln for 
burning china, etc.; the library is generously provided with fic- 
tion, history, biography, scientific works, reference texts, etc., is 
equipped with a cabinet finding list and Poole's Index and is 
gradually accumulating bound volumes of the standard maga- 
zines. 

II. Home Economics Building. 

A three-story red brick building in which is housed the De- 
partment of Domestic Science and Art. The department occupies 



80 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

the entire upper floor and the lower floor in part, and is equipped 
with sewing machines, charts, lockers, tables, desks, cooking uten- 
sils, range, individual gas stoves and ovens ; and with the necessary 
demonstration table, dishes, silverware, linen, glassware, etc., for 
a dining room. 

III. Mechanic Arts Building. 

A two-story red brick structure 60 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. 
The Departments of Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery 
occupy the upper floor and are equipped with drafting benches, 
lathes, benches, individual and special tools, Fox trimmer, mor- 
tiser, tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the De- 
partment of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is 
equipped with engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, hack 
saw, grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas engines is 
equipped with a thirty-five-horse-power Ideal engine; a twenty- 
horse-power horizontal side crank Howell engine, a twenty-horse 
power automatic gasoline engine, a Case traction engine, a Garr- 
Scott dismounted traction engine; International portable gas en- 
gine; a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine; a Gray Marine 
Motor; a six-horse-power Freeport gasoline engine, calorimeters, 
Crosby steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter; friction brake; 
water meter; injector; pumps; traps; boiler attachments, etc. 

IV. Dacotah Hall. 

Dacotah Hall is a four-story pressed brick structure with ac- 
commodations for one hundred young ladies, and under the direct 
supervision of a competent preceptress and a matron. All the 
rooms are provided with necessary furniture, including mattresses 
and pillows. Young ladies intending to reside at Dacotah Hall 
should bring at least three sheets, three pillow cases, blankets, 
towels, soap and napkins. The rooms are well arranged and com- 
fortable. Preference in the choice of rooms is given in the order 
of application. The health and comfort of the students are the 
first considerations, and all matters pertaining to health and sani- 
tation are carefully observed. Bath rooms, lavatories, closets and 
hot and cold water are found on each floor. Money paid for 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 81 

board is refunded in case of sickness or in case of absence extend- 
ing over a period of one week. Young ladies who room at Daco- 
tah Hall are furnished light and heat, and the use of a laundry 
without extra charge, but pay for the coal consumed for their 
private washing and ironing. They are required to care for their 
own rooms and to serve in turn waiting table. Mail is received at 
the Hall each day. 

V. Armory. 

A two-story red brick building. The first floor is occu- 
pied by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft 
forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor constitutes 
the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with dumb 
bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bar, traveling rings, spring board, 
vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physical train- 
ing; and with shower baths and lockers. 

VI Demonstration Farm. 

Thirty acres, adjacent to the buildings, has been reserved for 
a demonstration farm. One section has been fenced for culti- 
vation. The demonstration strips will average one- tenth acre 
each in area, will be carefully cultivated and the results used in 
classes in agriculture. Sod will be broken in the spring of 191 1 
but results will not be available tor class use before the Fall Term 
of 1912. 

VII. Athletic Field. 

The N-I Athletic Field is 288 ft. wide by 336 ft. long; en- 
closed; and in it are found the base-ball diamond, foot-ball field, 
out-door basket-ball field, rifle range and grand stand. Here are 
held the out-of-door meets and the target practice of Company A. 

ADMISSION 

(a) To the Normal Department. 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral charac- 
ter who has completed the common school course and received a 
diploma will be admitted without examination. 



82 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be 
admitted upon their credentials. 

(3) Applicants not vouched for by the classification com- 
nittee will be required to pass an examination. 

(b) To the Industrial Department. 

Any young man or young woman of good moral character 
who has completed the work of the seventh grade of the public 
schools and who presents satisfactory evidence of a fair working 
knowledge 01 the common branches will be admitted. 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of he school in both normal and industrial depart- 
ments are elective Each student, by and with the advice of pa- 
rents and teachers, chooses the coarse he is to pursue. This choice 
having been once made, no pupil will be permitted to change his 
course or to drop a subject except for the most important consider- 
ations and then only upon recommendation of the instructor and 
consent of the president The average work is five studies recited 
five times a week The "unit" of credit is a term's satisfactory work 
in a single subject, three units credit being given for a year's work in 
a single subject. No credit is given in academic subjects for less 
than a full term's work or upon the completion of the subject. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

(1) From the Normal Department. 

(a) To be entitled to graduation form the Four- Year Course 
the student must have earned 66 units credit, 54 of which are 
constants for all schedules, 6 being electives. Young men must, 
in addition, have received credit for two years of military drill. 

(b) To be entitled to graduation from the Five- Year Course 
the student must have earned 82.5 units credit, 64.5 of which are 
constants for all courses,' v'i 2 being electives. The military 
requirement is the same as above. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



83 



The complete requirement for graduation from the normal 
courses is as follows : 



Four-Year Course 



Five-Year Course 



9 units 


English 


9 units 


6 


' 


History 


9 


> 


10.5 


> 


Mathematics 


10.5 


y 


12 


> 


Science 


i5 


f 


7-5 


> 


Education 


10.5 


> 


3 


' 


Music 


3 


» 


3 


> 


Drawing 


3 


* 


3 


> 


Reviews and Meth. 


4-5 


» 


6 


> 


Electives 


12 


> 


6 " 


Physical Training 
Total 


6 " 


66 un 


its 


..82.5 


> 



Military Drill for Young Men. 

(2) From the Industrial Department. 

(a) From all industrial courses. To be entitled to grad- 
uation the student must have earned 66 units credit, 45 being 
constant for all schedules, 12 being elective from the arts and 6 
from academic subjects. All young men must, in addition, 
have received credit for two years military drill. The full re- 
quirement for graduation from art courses is as follows : 



English 
History 
Mathematics 


12 units 
6 " 
12 


Science 

Arts — Elective 

Electives 

Physical Training 


12 " 

12 " 

6 " 

6 " 


Total 


66 units 



(b) From the college preparatory course. To be en 
titled to graduation the student must have earned 66 units credit 
including credits in physical training. See schedule page 27. 



84 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

Diploma. Graduates from either department of the school 
will receive the diploma of the State Normal- Industrial School. 

Elementary state certificate. By an arrangement with 
the Department of Public Instruction graduates from the Normal 
Department will be granted, upon recommendation of the presi- 
dent and faculty, a State Certificate of the Second Class, valid for 
three years, which will entitle the holder to teach in the public 
schools of the state. 

Life state certificate. 

(a) Upon the completion of three years of successful teaching 
graduates from the Normal Department will be entitled to a state 
certificate good for life. 

(b) Graduates from either the Mechanic Arts Course, Home 
Economics Course or Fine Arts Course are entitled to a State 
Life Certificate which entitles the holder to teach that special art 
in the schools of the state. 



RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this 
school are admitted to the following institution with the standing 
indicated : 

(i) State university of north Dakota. The State Uni- 
versity ot North Dakota admits graduates upon their credentials 
allowing full credit for courses completed. 

(2) North Dakota agricultural college. The North 
Dakota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore year of its 
Agricultural and General Science Courses all graduates of this 
school. 

(3) Armour institute of technology. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trigonomet- 
ry are admitted to Armour Institute without examination and 
receive three years' credit in shop work. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 85 

(4) Michigan college of mines. Graduates of the Mechan- 
ic Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping are admitted without ex- 
amination. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are open 
for competition to all students : 

(1) Prize in oratory. The First National Bank of Ellen- 
dale offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in 
oratory under such rules as a committee of the faculty may pre- 
scribe. Won, in 1910, by Glenn V. Dill. 

(2) Military prize. (First) The State Normal-Industrial 
School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins first place in in- 
dividual drill at the annual military contest. Won in 1911 by 
Joseph Boyd. 

(3) Military prize. (Second) A bronze meda offered by 
the State Normal-Industrial School to the cadet winning second 
honors in the individual drill at the annual military contest. 
Won in 1911 by Howard Morrison. 

(4) Mechanic arts prize. The King Lumber Co., offer a 
fine steel Atkins saw to the first year student in Mechanic Arts 
designing and constructing the best piece of original woodwork. 

(5) Declamatory prize. Mr. F. L. Walker, President of 
the Board of Trustees, offers a silver medal to the student who 
obtains first place in declamation under such rules as the faculty 
may prescribe. Won, in 19 10, by Lucile Knapp. 

(6) Original story prize. This prize, given by Mr. W. M. 
Kern, is a gold medal and is awarded to the student who prepares 
the best original short story. Won, in 19 10, by Ida Balch. 

DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly con- 
duct, and prompt obedience to lawful authority are imperative. 
Fortunate the school in which the sentiment of the student body 
commends manly conduct. This is the type of discipline most de- 



86 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

sired at this school. In no sense is the State Normal- Industrial 
School a reform school and students who fail to yield a full and 
cheerful compliance to all requirements necessary for successful 
work and the honor of the school will be promptly dismissed. Dis- 
cipline is educative when reasonable and intelligable. This is the 
guiding thought with which all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free in all departments. Pupils in instrumental 
and vocal music pay for their lessons at the rate $9.00 for a term of 
twelve lessons. Piano rent is $1.00 per month. Room and board at 
Dacotah Hall is $3.50 per week payable, by the month, in advance. 
Good room and board may be had in private families at prices 
ranging from $4.00 per week upwards. Many students rent rooms 
and board themselves. Board and room rent, the chief items of ex- 
pense, range from $120 to $150 per year of 36 weeks. 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has been 
set apart for use of the library and reading room. It is open 
to all students until 4:30 o'clock school days. Arrangements are 
made by which students can draw books for use at times when the 
library is closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and cata- 
logued; a cabinet card catalogue; bound volumes of the leading 
magazines; Poole's index; congressional records, government re- 
ports and much other valuable material. New additions are con- 
stantly being made. Each department of the school has a well se- 
lected line of books for reference work. The leading magazines and 
newspapers are at the disposal of students. A trained librarian is in 
charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program may, up- 
on recommendation of the classification committee, arrange for 
special work. All such students, however, must satisfy the com- 
mittee that their preparation is sufficient to bring them properly 
within the entrance requirements. No student deemed deficient in 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 87 

the fundamentals will be permitted to elect the arts exclusively, but 
a fair balance will be maintained between so-called intellectual and 
manual training. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC 

Literary Societies. 

There are two literary societies, one for young women and 
another for young men. The Alphian is the organization of 
the young women, and the Sig ma Pi Iota that of the young .ien. 
These societies hold their meetings each Saturday afternoon. 
All students are required to take such part as the program com- 
mittee may designate. 

Boys' Glee Club. 

This is a voluntary organization of young men interested in 
vocal music. 

Girls' Glee Club. 

A volunteer organization similar to the above. 
The N-I Cadet Band. 

A voluntary organization. This is one of the most attractive 
features of the school life. To those who are musically inclined 
this offers an excellent opportunity for a substantial growth. 

Orchestra. 

Composed of students and teachers. This organization 
offers an excellent opportunity for substantial groundwork. 
Prospective students are urged to bring their instruments when 
they enter school. 

Young Women's Christian Association. 

A voluntary organization which aims to promote Christian 
life among the young women of the school. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

A branch of the Young Men's Christian Association flourishes 
under the management of the students. 



88 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Athletics. 

Foot ball, base ball and basket ball teams are organized and 
games scheduled and played under supervision of the faculty. 

Lecture Course. 

A strong lecture and musical course is maintained each school 
year and has become one of the schools most popular interests. 



RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of Ellendale take a deep interest in 
the students and many of them are identified with the various Sun- 
day schools and Christian societies. Students are urged to become 
regular attendants at the church of their choice. The prohibition 
law is usually strictly enforced in this city. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Cooperating with the County Superintendent of Dickey County 
the State Normal- Industrial School conducts a Summer Training 
School each year beginning in June. A strong faculty is retained for 
this session and tuition is free. Courses are offered in all Second anp 
First Grade subjects and in Domestic Science, Domestic Arts, Agri- 
culture and Manual Training. Examinations are held at the 
close of the term and final grades become available for county certifi- 
cates. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Normal Industrial School Bulletin is a quarterly pub- 
lication devoted to the interests of the school and is mailed pros- 
pective students upon request. The April 1908 number (Vol. 3, 
No. 2) was devoted to a discussion of Manual Training in Secondary 
Courses. It contains an address on Manual Training, an illustrated 
description of a Manual Training High School, recommendations, 
estimate of the cost of introducing Manual Training into high school 
courses, suggestive curricula, a brief bibliography of books on 
Manual Training, etc., etc. It is mailed gratis to superintendents 
who are interested. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 89 



TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Plan to make but one visit home — at Christmas. 

Bring with you such text books as may be ot use to you. 

Write the president a few days before leaving home in order that 
you may be met at the station. 

Enter upon the school year with the determination to make it 
the best year of your life. 



Roster of Students 



Enrollment for the Academic year 1910-11, up to April 1, 191 1 
and not including Summer School. 



Aasheim, Anna 
Abraham, Francis 
Anderson, Inga 
Alvord, Maud 
Alvord, Justin 
Anderson, Mable 
Applequist, Boone 
Arduser, Celia 
Arduser, Anna 
asperheim, neli 
Asperheim, Carrie 
Asperheim, Nora 
Axtell, Grace 
Barta, Albert 
Blumer, Fred 
Buckley, Mabel 
Buckley, Myrtle 
Bjelde, Andrew 
Bridges, Ethel 
Byer, Edward 
Bauer, John 
Bork, Fred 
Blumer, Minnie 
Barrett, William 
Bentley, Joseph 
Bentley, John 
Brown, Floyd 
Brown, Daisy 
Blomquist, Gust 
Bowler, Mamie 



Enderlin 

Ellendale 

Milnor 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Marion 

Marion 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Fullerton 

Ellendale 

Fallon, Mont. 

Fallon, Mont. 

Bergen, Norway 

Huron, Ind. 

Ellendale 

Java, S. D. 

Edgeley 

Ellendale 

Forbes 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Kulm 

Ellendale 



92 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Bjornstad, Clarence 
Bjornstad, Blanche 
Beggs, Mabel 
Beggs, Ruth 
Boom, Frances 
Boyd, Joseph 
Boyd, Viola 
Bowler, Lucy 
Bjornstad, Emma 
Bond, Fred 
Barnes, Basil 
Barnes, Barbara 
Baumbach, Tillie 
Baumbach, Ida 
Bassett, Zadie 
Bentley, Clell 
Bjornstad, Clara 
Briggle, LaDelle 
Barnes, Howard 
Caron, Archie 
Campbell, Bessie 
Clark, David 
Coleman, Alvia 
Crabtree, Benjamin 
Crabtree, Mattie 
Campbell, Clyde 
Collins, Fay 
Crabtree, Lucile 
Case, Mary 
Case, Byrdie 
Caldwell, Harriet 
Coleman, Lelah 
Dean, Archie 
Dobler, Christian 
Dean, Artemas 
Dethlefson, Dethlef 
dunton, imogene 
Duffy, Anna 
Davis, Vernie 
Deane, Cressie 



Ellendale 
Ellen dale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Florence, S. D. 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Fullerton 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Hazelton 
Ellendale 
Scranton 
Ellendale 

Oakes 
Lansford 
Merricourt 
Merricourt 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Monango 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 

Kulm 
Fullerton 

Oakes 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
Ellendale 
LaMoure 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



93 



Deane, Minnie 
Deane, Daisy 
Dawson, Grace 
Dawson, Theresa 
Dickey, Mae 
Dickey, Adah 
Denning, Ira 
Daulton, Mae 
Dales, Frank 
Dill, Glenn 
Edmonds, C. P. 
Enberg, Martha 
Enberg, Mary 
Engelhardt, Arthur 
Earnest, Robert 
Earnest, Wilma 
Eskes, Ellen 
Evans, Katie 
Erickson, Anna 
Eiden, Win. 
Eiden, Mamie 
Erickson, Peter 
Flemington, Adah 
France, Isaac 
Flamer, Alice 
Fleming, Boyd 
Forsyth, Phylinda 
Farrand, Emma 

FOSSUM, SlEGRED 

Green, Iva 
Giedt, Theo. 
Goddard, Herbert 
Goehring, J. J. 
Grow Vellora 
Guldborg, Mary 
Green, Lillie 
Gish, Grace 
Grove, John 
Geer, Mable 
Gohdes, Arnold 



Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Oakes 

Frederick, S. D. 

Vernon, S. D. 

Oakes 

Salem, S. D. 

Havanna 

Havanna 

Hebron 

Forbes 

Forbes 

Cold Harbor 

Forbes 

Ludden 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Pennock, Minn. 

Ellendale 

Gackle 

Milnor 

Monango 

Rutland 

Ellendale 

Frederick, S. D. 

Ellendale 

Lehr 

Ellendale 

Napoleon 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Klemme, la. 

Ellendale 

Davenport 



94 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Grosz, G. L. 
Hoel, Alma 
hutsinpiller, ross 
Harm, Jay 
Harm, Pearl 
Hill, Mead 
Hill, Myrtle 
Hoover, Amos 
Higgs, Vera 
Higgs, Archie 
Hamre, Mina 
Hinkle, William 
Hollan, Emma 
Harvey, Dorothy 
Howard, Nettie 
Howard, Nellie 
Howard, Emma 
Haas, Ruth 
Herbert, Caston 
Holte, Maude 
Holte, Howard 
Hollan, Ida 
Hafey, Coy 
Halstead, Chas. 
Halstead, Oliver 
Hogan, Carl 
Headley, Edward 
Jackson, Walter 
Johnson, Chas. 
Joseph, Lena 
Knapp, Lucile 
Kalbus, Emma 
Kosel, John 
Kinney, Edna 
Kalbus, Martha 
Knox, George 
Kroll, John 
Kellogg, Anna 
Kellogg, Ruth 
Lind, Agnes 



Kulm 

Ellen dale 

Oakes 

Ellen dale 

Ellen dale 

Ellen dale 

Ellen dale 

Chase, Mich. 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Leonard 

Hebron 

Kulm 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Kulm 

Monango 

Forbes 

Forbes 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Bowdel, S. D. 

Mound 

Ellendale 

Edgeley 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Grand Rapids 

Ellendale 

Monango 

Edgeley 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Turtle Lake 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



95 



Lange, Bertha 
Lucke, Chas. 
Leamer, Frank 
Lamb, Iris 
Lane, Chas. 
Lyons, Mabel 
Leiby, Ruth 
Letson, Howard 
Lawhead, Arthur 
Lewis, Ludwig 
Laemmle, John 
Lane, Abner 
LaBerge, Armand 
Lynde, Llewllyn 
Mallory, Floyd 
Morgan, Evan 
McMartin, Lita 
McGlynn, Paul 
Morrison, Glenn 
Morrison, Howard 
McEachran, E. A. 
McGraw, Hugh 
Malin, Cleveland 
McMartin, Gladys 
McMartin, Esther 
Morgan, Josie 
McCulloch, Laura 
Merchant, Edith 
Marsh, Lloyd 
Mills, Mary 
Myers, Effie 
Morgan, Howard 
Miller, Helen 
McPherson, Cecile 
Myers, Christ 
McDonald, Thos. 
McDonald, Daniel 
Misfeldt, George 
McGinnis, Lillian 
North, E. M. 



Kulm 

Fullerton 

Ellen dale 

Scranton 

Ellendale 

Altona, Mich. 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Taylor 

Dawson 

Ashley 

Ellendale 

Oakland 

Forbes 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Forbes 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ipswich, S. D. 

Cogswell 

Kulm 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Edgeley 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Park River 

Ludden 

Ellendale 

Bancroft, la. 

Monango 

Florence, S. D. 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Silverleaf 

Ellendale 



96 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Nelson, Bertha 
Olmstead, Osa 
Ostrum, Oscar 
Oliason, Carl 
Pinkney, B. F., Mrs. 
Peek, Bersha 
Potter, Robert 
Potter, Laura 
Pollock, Kittie 
Porter, Leigh 
Porter, Preston 
Porter, Hector 
Puth, Perry 
Prevey, Lola 
Rabe, Olga 
Rose, Joseph 
Reepsdorfp, Henry 

ROTHENBERG, KATE 

Rosethal, Arthur 
Rodine, Edna 
Rodine, Agnes 
Rouse, Ruth 
Rugroden, Pauline 
Streib, Walter 
St. Ores, Rufus 
Stephenson, Maud 
scheneker, mary 
Schwandt, William 
Smith, Walter 
Spoerl, Emma 
Saunders, Olive 
Shimmin, Albert 
Schmierer, Chris 
St. Ores, Rozella 
Steimke, Tille 
Schon, Julia 
Shimmin, Ellen 
Shimmin, Maud 
Saunders, Maurice 
Shimmin, William 



Marion 

Ludden 

Kulm 

Guelph 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Marion 

Milbank, S. D. 

Guelph 

Ellendale 

Ripon, Wis. 

Marion 

Ellendale 

Oakes 

Oakes 

Ellendale 

Forbes 

New Salem 

Ellendale 

Turtle Lake 

Marion 

Durbin 

Ellendale 

Marion 

Ellendale 

Clinton, Mo. 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Forman 

Ellendale 

Forbes 

Forbes 

Ellendale 

Clinton, Mo. 



NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



97 



Saunders, Blanche 
Stafsberg, Edna 
Smith, Sereno 
Twite, Andrew 
Tufte, Erick 
Twite, Sophia 
townsend, vern 

TOWNSEND, LlNVILLE 

tomren, claus 
Tomren, Annie 
Tjernlund, Carl 
Thompson, Elmer 
Tracy, Clarence 
Teichmann, Leah 
Upham, Maggie 
VanMeter, Herbert 
VanMeter, Harriet 
VanGarven, Mary 
Vandanacker, James 
Willis, Bessie 
Willis, Lyall 
White, William 
Wallace, James 
Waite, Francis 

WlEGLANDE, HARRY 

Walker, Robert 
Wagner, Winnifred 
Wirch, Henry 
Webb, Irene 
Walton, Frances 
Wolfe, Alfred 
Wilson, Hazel 
Williams, Estella 
Weist, Esther 



Forbe. 

Ellendale 

Florence, S. D. 

Frederick, S. Ds 

Northwood 

Frederick, S. D. 

Ellendale 

Ludden 

Kathryn 

Kathryn 

Kulm 

Fairdale 

Logan, Kans. 

Fullerton 

Grafton 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Fullerton 

Ellendale 

Rhame 

Rhame 

Ellendale 

Silverleaf 

Guelph 

Gladstone 

Ellendale 

Guehlp 

Wirch 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 

Ellendale 



98 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Wilson, Mamie Ellendale 

Wattles, Alice Ellendale 

White, Bernice Ellendale 

Williams, Melvin Ellendale 

Wallis, Harry Clear Lake, la. 

Zeigler, Lorenz George, la. 

ZlEGENHAGEL, JOHN Lehr 

Total, to April 1st, 1911 and not including Summer School, 272. 



Ind 



ex 



Admission 81 

Agriculture ."...: 38 

Athletics 88 

Bacteriology 42 

Blacksmithing 51 

Board and Rooms , 86 

Bookkeeping 69 

Cadet Band ! 87 

Calendar 7 

Carpentry 48 

Chemistry 41 

Civics 34 

College Preparatory Course 27 

Commercial Arts Course 68 

Cooking 64 

Courses of Instruction 31 

Courses of Study 

1. Normal 11 

2. Industrial 21 

Diploma and Certificates 84 

Discipline 85 

Domestic Arts and Science 62 

Dormitory, Dacotah Hall 80 

Drawing and Fine Arts 65 

Dressmaking 63 

Education 42 

Elective Courses 82 

Engineering, Farm 25 

English Literature 31 

Expenses 86 

Faculty 3 

Food Analysis 42 

Forging 48 

German 46 

Graduation 82 

High School Graduates 16 

History 34 

Home Economics 22 

Industrial Department 21 

Latin 44 



100 NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Lecture Course 88 

Library 86 

Literary and Musical Societies 87 

Location and Equipment 79 

Manual Training for Teachers 54 

Mathematics 35 

Machine Shop Practice 58 

Mechanic Arts 46 

Mechanic Arts Course 21 

Mechanical Drawing 52 

Military Science 73 

Music — Vocal 67 

Music — Instrumental 66 

Normal Department . . . 1 1 

Nursing „ 64 

Orchestra 87 

Painting 66 

Pattern Making 51 

Physics 41 

Physical Training 75 

Prizes 85 

Psychology 43 

Publications 88 

Relation to Other Schools 84 

Religious Environment 88 

Requirements for Graduation 82 

Roster of Students 91 

School Management 42 

Science 37 

Shop Work 58 

Special Students 86 

State Certificates 84 

Steam Engineering 71 

Stenography and Typewriting 70 

Summer School 88 

Teachers of Manual Training 17 

Turnery 48 

Y. M. C. A. 87 

Y. W. C. A 88 

Zoology 41 




■ •; •■:,-. ma&$$* -;- : '--- 



NORTH DAKOTA 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 




ELLENDALE, /\dM§7 NORTH DAK 



m l7 mr 



Catalog Number 

JUNE, A. D., 1912 



mam**mmammmmmmmmmmm*m**mmm 



:mJ 



CATALOG NUMBER 



Tforth 'Dakota 

State vformal and Sndustrial 

School 



Vol. 7 June, 191 2 No. 4 



Published quarterly by the 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North Dakota. 

Entered August 8. 1907, at Ellendale, North Dakota, under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



"No man is sound either in vision or in judgment who holds himself 
apart from the work of society." — Mabie. 



Board of Trustees 

(Arranged according to length of service) 

E. Magoffin, President, Monango 

F. L. Walker, Secretary, Ellendale 
R. McCarten, Cogswell 

H. Landblom, Fargo 
H. H. Perry, Ellendale 



Faculty 



A. S. Kingsford. Winona State Normal School, 1893; B. A. University 
of Wisconsin, 1897. Graduate work Chicago University; Supt. City 
Schools, 1 898- 1 907; Department Sociology and History, Moorhead 
Normal School, 1907-19 12; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1912. 

President 

Education 

Sociology 

A. E. Dunphy. Eau Claire, Wis., School of Mechanic Arts; Special Stu- 
dent Wisconsin University, 1907. Teacher of Mechanic Arts, Eau 
Claire, 1895-8; Waukesha Industrial School, 1898-9; State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1899. Acting President 191 1-12. 
Director of Mechanic Arts 

E. W. Ackert. Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899; B. Pd., 
Steinman College, 1901 ; A. B., Drake University, 1907; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, 1 90 1 -7; State Normal Industrial School, 1907. 

Mathematics 

W. G. Bowers. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., Ohio Wes- 
leyan University, 1905; A. M., Indiana State University, 1910; 
Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1903-5; 
Principal of Schools, Leesburg, O., 1905-6; Instructor in Science, 
Indiana Normal, 1906-7; State Normal-Industrial School, 1907. 
Physical Science 

P. A. Cooley. B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906; Graduate 
Kansas Wesleyan Business College, 1907; Master of Accounts, Kan- 
sas Wesleyan University, 1910; State Normal- Industrial School, 1909. 
Commercial Arts 
Military Science 



Mary B. Flemington. Graduate State Normal-Industrial School, 1903; 
A. B., University of North Dakota, 1907; Instructor State Normal- 
Industrial School, 1905-06; Principal of High School, 1908-09; State 
Normal-Industrial School, 1909. 

English 
Girls' Physical Training 

Gabriella C. Brendemuhl. A. B., Carleton College, 1905. Teacher 
of German and Preceptress, Rochester Academy, 1905-08; High 
School Principal, 1908-10; State Normal-Industrial School, 19 10. 

Preceptress 
German 

W. A. Broyles. B. S., Tri-State College, 1905; A. B., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1908; Principal Township Schools, Gaston, Indiana, 1903-7; 
Teacher of Science, Elwood, Ind. High School, 1908-10; State Normal- 
Industrial School, 19 10. 

Biological Science 
Agriculture 

Jacob Schutz. Graduate Royal Conservatory of Christiana, Norway, 
piano and voice; A. B.,- University of Christiana, 1897; Ph. B., Uni- 
versity of Christiana, 1900; Director of Music, Grand River College, 
Gallatin, Mo., 1906-09; Director of Music, Tuscaloosa Conservatory of 
Music, Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1 909-1 1. State Normal and Industrial School. 
1911. 

Piano 
Voice 

Julia O. Newton. B. A., University of Minnesota. High School Prin- 
cipal, Fairmont, Minn. High School Principal, Moorhead, Minn., 
1 905- 1 1. State Normal and Industrial School, 191 1. 

English 
History 

Rose W. Eaton. B. L., University of Minnesota; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Instructor Minnesota High Schools, ten years; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 191 1. 

Latin 
Psychology 



Bena Katherine Hansen. Advanced course, State Normal School, 
Mankato, Minn., 1902; Ph. B. University of Chicago, six years in- 
structor in Minnesota High Schools; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 19 1 2. 

Methods 
History of Education 

Alice Madeline Gunn. B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1901 ; 
post-graduate work, 1902-03; Director of Domestic Science Depart- 
ment and Home Economics Department, Iron Mt. Michigan., 1903- 
06; Illinois Woman's College, Jacksonville, 111., 1906-08; Director 
of Domestic Science and Art, State Normal School, Superior, Wis., 
1908-12. State Normal and Industrial School, 191 3. 
Director of Home Economics Dept. 

Mabel Burke. Clinton, Iowa, Public School; St. Joseph's Academy, St. 
Paul, State Normal and Industrial School, 19 10; Snow College, 
Rockford, 111.; Instructor N. Dak. High School; Instructor State 
Normal and Industrial School, 191 1. 

Instructor in Domestic Art 

Fannie Sims. Graduate Art Institute, Chicago. Diploma School of 
Education, University of Chicago. Instructor in Elementary School, 
University of Chicago, 1 908-1 1. Instructor and Preceptress in Moor- 
head Normal School, 1911-12. State Normal and Industrial School 
1912. 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 

(To be supplied) 
Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 

Joseph Ellsworth Swetland. Ripon College B. A. All Wisconsin 
fullback (football) four seasons; All Wisconsin guard (basketball). 
Holds college records in hurdles, shot, discus and hammer; Instructor 
and coach Grand Rapids and Eau Claire High School 19 10-12, State 
Normal and Industrial School 19 12. 

Athletic Director 



Carrie Tuttle. A. B., Wittenberg College, 1896; Student in Library 
Economy, Chicago University, 1904-6. State Normal-Industrial 
School, 1907. 

Librarian 

Grace S. Kane 
Grammar Grade, Training School 

W. C. Hutton. Graduate Lewis Institute; Instructor in Manual Train- 
ing, Lake Geneva, Wis., High School, 1908-12. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 191 2. 

Woodwork 
Cabinet Making 

Mrs. Ella Duncan 

Matron 

Carrie Steele 
Clerk 

Ina Jones. Graduate Stanley Hall, Minneapolis; special work in Music 
and Drawing, Minneapolis Conservatory of Music and elsewhere. 
Instructor in Music and Drawing, North Dakota High Schools. 
Summer session, 19 12, State Normal and Industrial School. 
Music and Drawing 

Wilma Earnest. Graduate in Home Economics, State Normal and 
Industrial School, 191 2. 

Assistant in Domestic Art 

Hugh McGraw. Graduate in Mechanic Arts, State Normal and Industrial 
School, 19 1 2. 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts 

Leigh Porter. Graduate in Mechanic Arts, State Normal and Industrial 
School, 191 1. 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts 

Albert Shimmin. Graduate in Mechanic Arts, State Normal and Indus- 
trial School, 191 1. 

Student Assistant, Science 



Calendar 



1912 

Fall Term of Thirteen Weeks begins, Monday, September 23 

Registration and Entrance Examinations, Monday, September 23 

Organization of Classes, Wednesday, September 25 
Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A. and Faculty Reception, Monday, September 30 

Thanksgiving Holiday, Thursday, November 28 

Fall Term ends, Friday, December 20 

1913 



Winter Term of Eleven Weeks begins, 

Registration and Entrance Examinations, 

Class Work begins, 

Annual Military Contest, 

Company A Reception and Banquet, 

Winter Term Ends, 

Spring Term of Twelve Weeks begins, 

Field Day, Schools, 

Memorial Day, Holiday, 

Baccalaureate Address, 

Annual Oratorical and Declamatory Contest, 

Annual School Concert, 

Field D*y, N-I., 1 P. M., 

Junior-Senior Reception, 

Commencement, 10:30 A. M., 

President's Reception, 

Alumni Reception, 



Monday, January 6 

Monday, January 6 

Tuesday, January 7 

Friday, March 21 

Saturday, March 22 

Saturday, March 22 

Tuesday, April 1 

Friday, May 16 

Friday, May 30 

Sunday, June 15 

Monday, June 16 

Tuesday, June 17 

Wednesday, June 18 

Wednesday, June 18 

Thursday, June 19 

Thursday, June 19 

Friday, June 20 



"Every man who opens up a road in the wilderness; every engineer 
throwing a bridge over icy rivers for weary travelers; every builder rearing 
abodes. of peace, happiness, and refinement for his generation; every smith 
forging honest plates that hold great ships in time of storm; every patriot 
that redeems his land with blood; every martyr forgotten and dying in his 
dungeon that freedom might never perish; every teacher who has gone forth 
to carry liberty, intelligence, and religion to the ignorant, still walks among 
men, working for society, and is unconsciously immortal." — Newell Dwight 
Hillis. 



General Information 

Purpose and Scope of the School: 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was established 
by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with a section of the state 
constitution providing for its creation. The revised law of 1907 relating 
to this school reads as follows: 

Name and Object : 

" That the Institution located at Ellendale, Dickey County, 
North Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial 
School, the object of such school being to provide instruction in a com- 
prehensive way in wood and iron work and the various other branches of 
domestic economy as a coordinate branch of education, together with 
mathematics, drawing and the other school studies and to prepare teachers 
in the science of education and the art of teaching in the public schools 
with special reference to manual training." 

It is believed with this broad but well defined mission that the Normal 
and Industrial School offers superior advantages to the young people of 
the state. Educational thought of the day is constantly emphasizing more 
and more the practical and everyday duties and problems of life along with 
the processes of formal culture. This school is well located and abundantly 
equipped to give this many sided and full preparation for the complete life. 

THE SCHOOL 

A cordial invitation is extended to all persons who may be interested 
in school work to visit this school, and especially, those who are engaged in 
educational work are invited. Trained teachers in the lines of work which 
the school prepares for are in demand and this school will always welcome 
inquiries for such teachers. It is the purpose of the administration of the 
school to be as helpful as possible to public school officials, and with that 
end in view will strive to place its graduates so that they will serve the 
state with credit to themselves and the interests involved. 

Persons desiring other information concerning the Normal and Indus- 
trial School at Ellendale, than that contained in this catalogue, are request- 
ed to address the President. 



IO NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Life of the Student: 

Dacotah Hall, remodelled, situated on the school campus, close to the 
other buildings is an unusually attractive home for young women. Few 
dormitories in the west are as attractive or as well furnished. The recep- 
tion halls and society rooms are unusually pleasing. Here the young 
women of the school are surrounded by a stimulating and Christian influ- 
ence. The purpose of the administration of the hall is to make it, not a 
boarding house, but a Christian home, where every effort may be put forth 
to maintain the amenities of life, which prevail in homes of influence, re- 
finement and good cheer. It is believed that the social life which the hall 
offers is one of the most valuable parts of the students education while 
here. The building is arranged to accommodate nearly one hundred stu- 
dents, and is modern thruout, having a complete equipment of bathrooms, 
toilet rooms, steam heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are 
well lighted and well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by the students 
themselves. Each young lady intending to reside at the hall should bring 
at least three sheets, three pillow cases, blankets, towels, soap and napkins. 
Preference in choice of rooms is given in order of application. The health 
and comfort of the students are the first consideration and all matters re- 
lating to food, hygiene and sanitation are carefully observed. 

Living expenses including board, room, light, heat and use of laundry 
and bath rooms, are $13.50 per month of four weeks. Table board is 
$3.00 per week. This rate is exceedingly low, when one considers the 
completeness of the service offered. The school does not aim to pay all 
the cost of operating the hall from these receipts. The table board is ex- 
cellent and the building is finely equipped. Single meals and meals to 
guests are 20c each. Bills are payable one month in advance. No dis- 
count is made for absences of less than a week except in the case of the 
regular vacations, as indicated in the calendar. Students are required to 
take care of their own rooms. Mail is taken to the post-office and delivered 
twice a day. 

Work of the Preceptress: 

It is the belief of the administration that the dormitory should form 
the center of school life and its influence should spread throughout school 
circles, creating a sentiment for that which is ennobling in the lives of 
young women. 

To stimulate this influence and to further the spirit of unity in school 
activities, the preceptress has, as much as possible, the same personal inter- 
est in the students residing outside of the dormitory as those within. Thus 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG I I 

the health, the profitable use of time and energy, the social welfare of the 
women are all matters which concern her in an intimate way. 

With a view to a closer association of school and home interests the 
preceptress entertains the young women of the school in groups. These oc- 
casions are of an informal nature and aim to afford an opportunity for social 
grace, initiative along lines of entertainment, and especially to foster a feel- 
ing of good fellowship throughout the student body of young women. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The plant of the State Normal Industrial School consists of five main 
buildings and a power plant and engine laboratory. 

I. Carnegie Hall. 

This is a four story pressed brick structure, beautiful and commodious. 
In it are found the Normal Departments, Departments of Science, English, 
Mathematics, Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the 
Library. In each department the equipment is such that students may 
reap the most generous returns from their efforts. Physics, Chemistry, Bi- 
ology and Physiography are taught in laboratories in the most approved man- 
ner ; the Department of English has access to abundant literature, the Com- 
mercial Department is provided with typewriters, duplicators, Edison dic- 
tation phonograph records, etc.; the Department of Music owns eight high 
grade pianos and supplements these with rented instruments; the Depart- 
ment of Fine Arts is equipped with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large 
numbers of casts, lockers, kiln for burning china, etc. ; the library is gener- 
ously provided with fiction, history, biography, scientific works, reference 
texts, etc., is equipped with a cabinet finding list and Poole's Index and is 
gradually accumulating bound volumes of the standard magazines. 

II. Home Economics Building. 

A three-story red brick building in which is housed the Department 
of Domestic Science and Art. The department occupies the entire upper 
floor and the lower floor in part, and is equipped with sewing machines, 
charts lockers, tables, desks, cooking utensils, range, individual gas stoves 
and ovens: and with the necessary demonstration table, dishes, silverware, 
linen, glassware, etc., for a dining room. 



12 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

III. Mechanic Arts Building. 

A two-story red brick structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The De- 
partments of Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the up- 
per floor and are equipped with drafting benches, lathes, benches, individual 
and special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the Department 
of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is equipped with engine 
lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, hack saw, grinder, etc. The de- 
partment of steam and gas engines is equipped with a thiry-five-horse- 
power Ideal engine; a twenty-horse-power horizontal side crank Howell 
engine, a twenty-horse power automatic gasoline engine, a Case traction 
engine, a Garr-Scott dismounted traction engine; International portable gas 
engine; a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine; a Gray Marine Motor; 
a six-horse-power Freeport gasoline engine, calorimeters, Crosby steam en- 
gine indicator, Amsler planimeter; friction brake; water meter; injector; 
pumps ; traps ; boiler attachments, etc. 

V. Armory. 

A two-story red brick building. The first floor is occupied by the 
classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft forges, anvils, hammers, 
vises, etc. The second floor constitutes the gymnasium and armory proper, 
and is equipped with dumb bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bar, traveling 
rings, spring board, vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physi- 
cal training ; and with shower baths and lockers. 

VI. Demonstration Farm. 

Thirty acres, adjacent to the buildings, has been reserved for a demon- 
stration farm. One section has been fenced for cultivation. The demon- 
stration strips will average one-tenth acre each in area, will be carefully cul- 
tivated and the results used in classes in agriculture. Sod will be broken in 
the spring of 191 1 but results will not be available for class use before the 
Fall Term of 191 2. 

VII. Athletic Field. 

The N-I Athletic Field is 288 ft. wide by 336 ft. long; enclosed; and 
in it are found the base-ball diamond, foot-ball field, out-door basket-ball 
field, rifle range and grand stand. Here are held the out-of-door meets and 
the target practice of Company A. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG I 3 

ADMISSION 

(a) To the Normal Department. 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral character who 
has completed the common school course and received a diploma will be 
admitted without examination. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be admitted 
upon their credentials. 

(3) Applicants not vouched for by the classification committee will 
be required to pass an examination. 

(b) To the Industrial Department. 

Any young man or young woman of good moral character who has 
completed the work of the seventh grade of the public schools and who 
presents satisfactory evidence of a fair working knowledge of the common 
branches will be admitted. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial departments 
are elective. Each student, by and with the advice of parents and teachers, 
chooses the course he is to pursue. This choice having been once made, no 
pupil will be permitted to change his course or to drop a subject except for 
the most important considerations and then only upon recommendation of 
the instructor and consent of the president. The average work is five 
studies recited five times a week. The "unit" of credit is a term's satis- 
factory work in a single subject, three units credit being given for a year's 
work in a single subject. No credit is given in academic subjects for less 
than a full term's work or upon the completion of the subject. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
(1) From the Normal Department. 

(a) To be entitled to graduation from the Four-Year Course the 
student must have earned 66 units credit, 54 of which are constants for all 
schedules, 6 being electives. Young men must, in addition, have received 
credit for two years of military drill. 

(b) To be entitled to graduation from the Five-Year Course the 
student must have earned 82.5 units credit, 64.5 of which are constants for 
all course, 12 being electives. The military requirement is the same as 
above. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



The complete requirement for graduation from the normal courses is 
as follows: 



Four-Year Course 



9 units 


English 


6 " 


History 


10.5" 


Mathematics 


12 " 


Science 


7-5" 


Education 


3 " 


Music 


3 " 


Drawing 


3 " 


Reviews and Meth 


6 " 


Electives 


6 " 


Physicial Training 


66 units _. 


Total 



Five- Year Course 

9 units 

9 
10.5 

15 
10.5 

3 
3 

4-5 
12 
6 



.82.5 



Military Drill for Young Men. 



(2) From the Industrial Department. 

(a) From all industrial courses. To be entitled to graduation 
the student must have earned 66 units credit, 45 being constant for all 
schedules, 12 being elective from the arts and 6 from academic subjects. 
All young men must, in addition, have received credit for two years military 
drill. The full requirement for graduation from art courses is as follows : 



English 
History 
Mathematics 
Science 

Arts — Elective 
Electives 
Physical Training 

Total 



12 un 

12 

12 

12 

12 

6 ' 

6 



ts 



66 units 



(b) From the college preparatory course. To be entitled to 
graduation the student must have earned 66 units credit including credits 
in physical training. See schedule page 27. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG I 5 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

Diploma. Graduates from either department of the school will re- 
ceive the diploma of the State Normal-Industrial School. 

Elementary state certificate. By an arrangement with the De- 
partment of Public Instruction graduates from the normal Department will 
be granted, upon recommendation of the president and faculty, a State 
Certificate of the Second Class, valid for three years, which will entitle the 
holder to teach in the public schools of the state. 

Life state certificate. 

(a) Upon the completion of three years of successful teaching gradu- 
ates from the Normal Department will be entitled to a state certificate good 
for life. 

(b) Graduates from either the Mechanic Arts Course, Home Econom- 
ics Course or Fine Arts Course are entitled to a State Life Certificate which 
entitles the holder to teach that special art in the schools of the state. 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this school are 
admitted to the following institutions with the standing indicated : 

(i) State university of north Dakota. The State University of 
North Dakota admits graduates upon their credentials allowing full credit 
for courses completed. 

(2) North Dakota agricultural college. The North Dakota 
Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore year of its Agricultural and 
General Science Courses all graduates of this school. 

(3) Armour institute of technology. Graduates of the Me- 
chanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trigonometry are admit- 
ted to Armour Institute without examination and receive three years' credit 
in shop work. 

(4) Michigan college of mines. Graduates of the Mechanic 
Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping are admitted without examination. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are open for com- 
petition to all students: 

( 1 ) Prize in Oratory. The First National Bank of Ellendale 
offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in oratory under 
such rules as a committee of the faculty may prescribe. Won, in 19 12, by 
Glenn Morrison. A second prize of $5.00 in gold is given by E. N. Leiby. 
Won, in 19 12, by Estella Williams. 



ID NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(2) Military Prize. (First) The State Normal and Industrial 
School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins first place in individual 
drill at the annual military contest. Won in 191 2 by Lyall Willis. 

(3) Military Prize. (Second). A bronze medal offered by the 
State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet winning second honors in 
the individual drill at the annual military contest. Won in 191 2 by Arthur 
Rosenthal. 

(4) Declamatory Prize. The Board of Trustees offers a gold med- 
al to the student who obtains first place in declamation under such rules as 
the faculty may prescribe. Won in 19 12 by Lena Joseph. A second prize 
of $5.00 in gold is given by Axtell and Amphlett. Won, in 191 2, by Lyall 
Willis. 

(5) Original Story Prize. This prize, given by the Welcher 
Hardware Co., is a gold medal and is awarded to the student who prepares 
the best original short story. Won, in 19 12, by Ruth Kellogg. 

(6) Typewriting Prize. This prize consists of a gold medal, to be 
given to the student who received first place in a typewriting contest, under 
such rules as may be prescribed. Won, in 191 2, by Hazel Wilson. 

DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly conduct, and 
prompt obedience to lawful authority are imperative. Fortunate the school 
in which the sentiment of the student body commends manly conduct. This 
is the type of discipline most desired at this school. In no sense is the 
State Normal-Industrial School a reform school and students who fail to 
yield a full and cheerful compliance to all requirements necessary for suc- 
cessful work and the honor of the school will be promptly dismissed. Dis- 
cipline is educative when reasonable and intelligible. This is the guiding 
thought with which all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition is free in all departments. Pupils in instrumental and vocal 
music pay for their lessons at the rate $9.00 for a term of twelve lessons. 
Piano rent is $1.00 per month. Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $3.50 
per week payable, by the month, in advance. Good room and board may 
be had in private families at prices ranging from $4.00 per week upwards. 
Many students rent rooms and board themselves. Board and room rent, 
the chief items of expense, range from $120 to $150 per year of 36 weeks. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG I 7 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has been set 
apart for use of the library and reading room. It is open to all students 
until 4 130 o'clock school days. Arrangements are made by which students 
can draw books for use at times when the library is closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and catalogued ; 
a cabinet card catalogue ; bound volumes of the leading magazines ; Poole's 
index; congressional records, government reports and much other valuable 
material. New additions are constantly being made. Each department of 
the school has a well selected line of books for reference work. The leading 
magazines and newspapers are at the disposal of students. A trained 
librarian is in charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program may, upon recom- 
mendation of the classification committee, arrange for special work. Ail 
such students, however, must satisfy the committee that their preparation is 
sufficient to bring them properly within the entrance requirements. No 
student deemed deficient in the fundamentals will be permitted to elect the 
arts exclusively, but a fair balance will be maintained between so-called in- 
tellectual and manual training subjects. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 
Literary Societies. 

There are two literary societies, one for young women and another for 
young men. The Alphian is the organization of the young women, and the 
Sigma Pi Iota that of the young men. These societies hold their meetings 
each Saturday afternoon. All students are required to take such part as the 
program committee may designate. 

Two glee clubs have been established during the year; the "Schubert" 
club (girls) and the "Orpheus" club (boys). An orchestra — the N-I. 
Symphony Orchestra — has been established and has been doing good work 
with difficult selections. The course in music in public schools has been 
considerably enlarged and made more interesting and valuable to the stu- 
dent in reference to general education. Four recitals have been given dur- 
ing the year and one operetta "Dress Rehearsal." With the advanced 
students, works of the masters have been studied with as much care and 
accuracy as in a conservatory of music. 



I» NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Orchestra. 

Composed of students and teachers. This organization offers an ex- 
cellent opportunity for substantial groundwork. Prospective students are 
urged to bring their instruments when they enter school. 
Young Women's Christian Association. 

A voluntary organization which aims to promote Christian life among 
the young women of the school. 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

A branch of the Young Men's Christian Association flourishes under 
the management of the students. 

ATHLETICS. 

Foot-ball, basket-ball, baseball and track athletics are organized and 
games are scheduled and played under supervision of the faculty. For the 
year 191 2 a regular athletic coach and director has been engaged and it is 
believed that this will prove to be a stimulus to larger and better organized 
athletic activities. The coach employed is a man who has won a name for 
himself in a variety of athletic lines and comes to the school with the very 
highest recommendations as a coach, a scholar and a man. 

Lecture Course. 

A strong lecture and musical course is maintained each school year 
and has become one of the school's most popular interests. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of Ellendale take a deep interest in the 
students and many of them are identified with the various Sunday schoois 
and Christian societies. Students are urged to become regular attendants at 
the church of their choice. The prohibition law is usually strictly enforced 
in this city. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Cooperating with the County Superintendent of Dickey County the 
State Normal-Industrial School conducts a Summer Training School each 
year beginning in June. A strong faculty is retained for this session and 
tuition is free. Courses are offered in all Second and First Grade subjects 
and in Domestic Science, Domestic Arts, Agriculture and Manual Training. 
Examinations are held at the close of the term and final grades become 
available for country certificates. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 1 9 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Normal Industrial School Bulletin is a quarterly publication de- 
voted to the interests of the school and is mailed to prospective students upon 
request. The April 1908 number (Vol. 3, No. 2) was devoted to a discus- 
sion of Manual Training in Secondary Courses. It contains an address on 
Manual Training, an illustrated description of a Manual Training High 
School, recommendations, estimate of the cost of introducing Manual Train- 
ing into high school courses, suggestive curricula, a brief bibliography of 
books on Manual Training, etc., etc. It is mailed gratis to superintendents 
who are interested. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Plan to make but one visit home — at Christmas. 

Bring with you such text books as may be of use to you. 

Write the president a few days before leaving home in order that you 
may be met at the station. 

Enter upon the school year with the determination to make it the best 
year of your life. 



20 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Normal Department 

ON E of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota is weil 
educated and trained teachers to serve in the public schools. 
The thoughtful observer, who has studied public school condi- 
tions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other requirement relating to 
education is of such pressing importance. The act which defines the mission 
of the State Normal-Industrial School requires it to train teachers "in the 
science of education and the art of teaching in the public schools with 
special reference to manual training." In harmony with the spirit of this 
mandate the standard normal course has been so planned as to afford 
thorough and systematic training of a three-fold character : 

(i) Academic: The academic courses imply a thorough and com- 
prehensive literary and scientific training. Thorough and accurate scholar- 
ship is the teacher's most fundamental equipment. 

(2) Industrial: Courses in which the student's powers of expres- 
sion are trained jointly with his receptive faculties. 

(3) Professional: Scholarship alone is not sufficient. All right 
teaching is based upon certain well-defined principles of individual and 
social development, and upon a clear comprehension of the theories whicn 
underlie practice. Opportunity is afforded for applying the principles in 
practice and for studying the results under sympathetic and competent su- 
pervision. 

NORMAL COURSES 

The State Normal- Industrial School offers three normal courses and 
the student is permitted to elect the one he shall pursue. These courses are 
as follows : 

( 1 ) An Elementary Course for Rural Teachers. 

(2) A Four- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates. 

(3) A Five- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates. 




Domestic Art Work. 




Demonstration Dining Room 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



2 1 



Elementary Course for Rural Teachers. (10% months) 
Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term Summer Term 



Grammar 


Grammar 


Grammar 




History 


History 


History 


Physiology and 

Hygiene 
Spelling 
Penmanship 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Geography 


Geography 


Civics 


Manual Training 


Drawing 


Domestic Art 


Reviews 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Pedagogy 





Physical Training throughout the school year. 

Students, to enter upon the above course, must be at least 1 7 years of 
age and must either have completed the common school course of study or 
have been granted a certificate to teach in North Dakota. Those who com- 
plete the course will receive a second grade certificate. 

FOUR YEAR COURSES 

The electives offered make possible the following four-year schedules. 

(1) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course. 

(4) Latin course. 



I 




II 




III 




IV 


Grammar 


3 


Rhet. & Comp 


3 


Literature 


3 


Obs. & Prac. \y 2 


History 


2 


Genl. History 


3 






Civics \ 


Review & Meth. 3 


Arithmetic 


3 


Algebra 


3 Geometry 

1 


1/2 


Geometry 3 


Geography 


3 


Agriculture 


3 Biology 

i 


3 


Physics 3 


Music 


3 


Drawing 


3 Psychology 

i 


3 


Hist. & Phil, of 
Ed. 3 






i Elective 


3 


Elective 3 



22 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Physical training and rhetoricals throughout the course. 
Required for graduation, 60 units, 6 of which are electives. 

1. English. 

The study of language is continued throughout three years. 

(a) Grammar. The principles of English grammar, Course I. 

(b) Literature i. Composition, Rhetoric and the study of Master- 
pieces, Course II. 

(c) Literature i i. The critical study of the masters and a definite 
amount of reading. Course III. 

2. History and Civics. 

(a) American history. An academic study and review designed 
to familiarize students with the sequence of American History. Course VI. 

(b) Civics. Colonial, Revolutionary and Federal Government. 
Course VII. 

(c) Ancient history. The essentials of history from the earliest civil- 
ization in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the establishment of the western em- 
pire by Charles the Great. Course VIII. 

(d) Modern history. Mediaeval and Modern European History 
down to the present day. Course IX. 

3. Mathematics. 

(a) Algebra. Elementary Algebra to quadratic equations. Course 
XII. 

(b) Plane geometery. Introduction; half-year course. Course 
XIV. 

(c) Solid geometery. Plane and solid geometry completed. Course 
XV. 

4. Science. 

(a) Geography. A comprehensive and critical study of descriptive 

geography. Course XVI. 

(b) Physical geography. Physical ages of the earth; underlying 
causes; effect upon mankind, etc. Course XVII. 

(c) Agriculture. Soils, crops, animal husbandry. Course XX. 

(d) Zoology. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work. Course 
XXI. 

(e) Botany. Study of types, their life history, relation to surround- 
ings, etc. Course XXII. 

(/) Physiology. A comprehensive study of the fundamental princi- 
ples of the science; required of Home Economics students. Course XXIII. 




Machine Shop. 




Blacksmith Shop. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 2} 

(g) Physics. A full and comprehensive treatment of the subject by 
means of lectures, recitations and laboratory work. Course XXIV. 

5. Education. 

(a) Psychology. The processes by which knowledge is acquired ami 
elaborated. Course XXIX. 

(b) History of education. The educational systems of ancient 
and modern people together with a study of the lives and practices of the 
educational reformers. Course XXXI. 

(c) Philosophy of Education. The nature and meaning of edu- 
cation and the being to be educated. Course XXXII. 

(d) Reviews and Methods. Senior reviews and approved methods. 
Course XXXIV. 

(e) Observation and Practice. Actual experience under condi- 
tions similar to those the student must meet after graduation. Course 
XXXVI. 

6. Vocal Music, 

(a) Tune, time, technique, etc. The principles of music as applied in 
instruction in the grades of the public schools. Musical appreciation. 
Course LXXXII. 

7. Drawing. 

(a) Taught, not as an end, but as a means; a mode of expression. 
Course LXXIV. 

8. Electives. 

Six units, two year subjects, as follows : 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LI II to LXIII. 

(b) Manual training. Courses XLV to LI I. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XXXVIII to XLI. 

(e) German. Courses XLI I to XLIV. 

FIVE YEAR COURSES 

The electives offered make possible the following schedules : 
(i) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course. 

(4) Latin course. 



24 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

I II III IV V 



Grammar 3 


Composition 
& Rhetoric 3 


Literature 3 


Rev. and 
Meth. 1*4 


Rev. and 
Methods 3 


History 2 
Civics 1 


Gen. History 3 




Modern 
History 3 


Sociology 3 


Arithmetic 3 


Algebra 3 


Geom. 1 y 2 


Geometry 3 




Geography 3 


Agriculture 3 


Biology 3 


Physics 3 


Chemistry 3 


Music 3 




Psychol. 3 


Hist, and 
Phil, of Ed. 3 


Observation 
& Prac. 1 ]/ 2 


Drawing 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 



Physical Training and Rhetoricals throughout the course. 

In the Five-Year Courses the English, History, Mathematics, Science 
and Education Schedules are identical with those of the four-year courses 
with the following exceptions : 

I. Chemistry. 

The laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles developed in 
the recitation and laboratory. Courses XXV — XXVI. 

II. Sociology. 

Principles of Sociology. A systematic study of the principles under- 
lying the structure of society. Course XXXVII. 

III. Reviews and Methods. 

Senior Reviews and emphasis upon methods of presentation. Cour.v; 
XXXV. 

IV. Electives. 

Twelve units, four-year courses, as follows: 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LI 1 1 to LXIII. 

(b) Manual training. Courses XLV to LII. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XXXVIII to XLI. 

(e) German Courses XLII to XLIV. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 25 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 

Graduates of first class high schools or those who have completed 
equivalent courses will be graduated from the Four-Year Course or the 
Five-Year Course after one or two years work respectively. Such persons 
will be required to complete courses in Psychology, History and Philosophy 
of Education, Practice, Methods and Reviews and sufficient electives to 
total 1 5 or 30 units according to the course. 

TEACHERS OF MANUAL TRAINING, DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

AND ART 

The demand for teachers of Manual Training and Domestic Science 
and Art greatly exceeds the supply and as a result the wages paid is much 
in advance of that offered in other lines. In almost every other line of 
teaching the supply exceeds the demand. Graduates of the Four-Year 
Course who have elected Manual Training or Domestic Science and Art will 
be authorized to teach in any of the common, graded or high schools of the 
state, except in the high school departments of schools doing four years of 
high school work. Graduates of the five-Year Course who have elected 
Manual Training or Domestic Science and Art will be authorized to teach 
in similar high schools and, in addition, to teach their elective, Manual 
Training or Domestic Science and Art, -in any class of high schools. 
The Five-Year Course in Manual Training and Domestic Science and Art is 
especially designed to prepare teachers in these special subjects for positions 
in First Class High Schools, Normal Schools, Academies, etc. No other 
school in the northwest is better equipped to train teachers in these special 
subjects. No other school in North Dakota is so well equipped to train 
teachers in these special subjects. The faculty offers every proper aid to 
graduates to secure positions. 



26 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



"The working races have been the victorious races; the non-working 
races hftve been the subject races." — Mabie. 



Industrial Department 



One purpose of the State of North Dakota in establishing the STATE 
NORMAL-INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL was to provide an institution in which 
young men and young women might receive such special instruction and 
training as would prepare them to earn their own livings and to take their 
places as useful and self-supporting members of society. The state requires 
that the school shall instill into the minds of young men and young women a 
true appreciation of the value, desirability and dignity of skilled labor ; that 
it shall prepare them for immediate and well-directed action in the practical 
affairs of life— that they shall be trained TO DO as well as TO THINK. In 
harmony with this thought, the State Normal-Industrial School offers such 
industrial courses as shall prepare students for higher living and more 
efficient service in the HOME, the SHOP, the FIELD and the OFFICE. 

INDUSTRIAL COURSES 

The following industrial courses are offered. In each of these courses 
thorough and systematic instruction is prescribed in English, Mathematics, 
History and Science. 

I. Mechanic Arts Course. 

This Course is designed to afford a thorough training in Mechanical 
Drawing and in the use and application of tools ; to prepare young men to 
enter upon higher technical courses; to train all 'round mechanics. 

(i) Joinery and turnery. _Care and use of the common tools and 
the mastery of the lathe. Courses XLV, XLVI, XLVII. 

(2) Forging. Drawing out, bending, welding, making of useful arti- 
cles. Course XLVI 1 1. 



ft 

ft 







NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 27 

(3) Pattern making and molding. The making of patterns; 
foundry practice. Courses L, LI. 

(4) Chipping and filing. For the purpose of developing skill in the 
use of the file and cold chisel. Course LI I. 

(5) Machine shop practice. Tool making, tool work, tool and 
screw work. Course LI II. 

(6) Drawing. Freehand, mechanical. Courses LIV, LV, LVI, LVII. 

II. Home Economics Course. 

Designed to train young women to administer intelligently and wisely 
the affairs of a home; to afford thorough instruction in the principles that 
underlie artistic dressmaking ; to train for positions as dressmakers, matrons, 
house-keepers, seamstresses and home makers. 

( 1 ) Hand sewing. Materials, stitches, measurements, draughting 
and making. Course LI 1 1. 

(2) Machine sewing. Care and use of machine and machine sew- 
ing. 

(3) Dressmaking. Measuring, drafting, cutting, fitting and making. 
Course LIV. 

(4) Design. Use of pencil and water color; study of bows, gowns 
and drapery; the human form; designing gowns for home and street. 
Course LVI. 

(5) Elementary cookery. Classification of foods; principles of 
cooking; application. Course LVI 1 1. 

(6) Advanced cookery. Composition, value and cost. Course LX. 

(7) Investigation into household problems. Course LXI. 

(8) Chemistry. General and analytic chemistry. Courses XXV, 
XXVI. 

(9) Food analysis. The chemistry of foods. Course XXVII. 

(10) Bacteriology. Principles, their significance and application to 
life. Course XXVIII. 

III. Fine Arts Course. 

Designed to afford a culture course in fine arts ; to train students to fill 
positions as teachers and supervisors of Drawing and Art Instruction; and 
to afford instruction in the principles of design and their application. 

(1) Free hand drawing. Drawing in pencil and charcoal from 
ornament, still life and flowers. Course LXIV. 

(2) Applied design. Application of design to objects. 

(3) Historic ornament. Historic styles and drawings of the typical 
features of each. 



28 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(4) Composition. Space relations, proportion, color harmony, etc. 

(5) Metal work. Problems in sheet metal. Course LXVI. 

(6) Pottery. Hand made pieces; tiles; decorations; glazing and 
firing. Course LXVI I. 

IV. Music Course. 

Designed to afford opportunity for culture as a fine art and to train 
teachers. 

(1) Hand culture. 

(2) Sight reading. 

(3) Major and minor scales. 

(4) Phrasing. 

(5) Graded studies and studies from masterpieces. 

(6) Harmony. 

(7) Musical history. 

(8) Courses lxviii to lxxii. 

V. Commercial Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to fit young men and young women for positions of responsi- 
bility and trust in the business world, such as bookkeepers, office clerks, 
amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and teachers of commercial subjects. 

(1) Spelling. A h:ilf-year course in both oral and written commer- 
cial spelling including a careful drill in pronunciation, marking and defining. 
Course LXXV. 

(2) Penmanship. A half-year course in rapid legible writing. Course 
LXXVI. 

(3) Commercial arithmetic. Numerous problems such as will con- 
front the student in the business affairs of life. Course LXXVI 1 1. 

(4) Bookkeeping. Single and double entry through various forms of 
business. Course LXXVI I. 

(5) Typewriting. The "touch" system. Course LXXXII. 

(6) Commercial geography. The natural and industrial resources 
of all important countries, routes, means of communication, etc. Course 
LXXIX. 

(7) Commercial law. The various forms of commercial paper and 
the rights of the individual under the law. Course LXXX. 

VI. Stenographic Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to prepare young men and young women for positions as 

amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and office clerks. 

(1) Spelling. Oral and written spelling; especial attention to pro- 
nunciation and the marking and defining of words. Course LXXV. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 2Q 

(2) Penmanship. Plain, rapid, legible, business penmanship. Course 
LXXVI. 

(3) English. Composition and Rhetoric based upon Lockwood and 
Emerson. Letter-writing, description, narration, punctuation, capitaliza- 
tion, etc. Course II. 

(4) Shorthand. A thorough drill in combining the signs into words, 
phrases and sentences; drills for speed, practice in transcribing notes, class 
and office dictation, etc. Course LXXXI. 

(5)Typewriting. "Touch" typewriting. Course LXXXII. 

VII. Short Course in Dressmaking. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of girls who 
desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking and whose time 
and means are limited. This course embraces the following subjects : 

(1) Arithmetic. A practical course in the elements; factoring; 
fractions; denominate numbers; household accounts, etc. Course XI. 

(2) Grammar. A review of the elements of English Grammar. 

(3) Cookery. The underlying principles of cooking; daily practice in 
cooking; table setting, serving, etc. Course LIX. 

(4) Dressmaking. Instruction in hand sewing and dressmaking; 
the cutting, fitting and making of dresses ; thorough drill in pattern drafting 
and dressmaking. Course LV. 

VIII. Short Course in Farm Engineering. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course planned to meet the most practical re- 
quirements of young men on the farm. The course includes the following 
lines of work : 

(1) Arithmetic. The elements; factoring; fractions; denominate 
numbers; measurements of walls, tanks, bins, lands, etc., accounts with 
farm crops ; problems relating to the farm, as cost of fences, buildings, silos, 
rations, etc.; commercial paper, etc. Course XI. 

(2) Agriculture. Soil and Soil Water; Plant, Plant Food and 
Growth; Rotation of Crops; Germination ; Seed Testing; Transplanting; etc. 
Course XIX. 

(3) Carpentry. Tools; the joints and splices necessary in farm con- 
struction; working drawings and construction in minature. Course XLVH. 

(4) Blacksmithing. Pupils make from stock tongs, hammer, 
chisels, rings, links, chains, devices, harrow teeth, etc. Courses XLIX, 
XLVII. 

(5) Engines. A study of steam engines, boilers, gas engines, power 
transmission, lubricants, etc., and stationary and traction engine practice. 
Courses XLIX to LII. 



3Q 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



X 



o 
o 

< 

£> 

Q 

n 

O 

!* 

P-i 
<J 
g M 

I M 

02 



.3 

If 



o 

s 



rr» 


<T\ 


rr\ 




rc\ 












£Z! 




>-> 






lab 




CU 

s 

O 




<n 
0> 


c 


r^ 


<U 




-C 


w 


Uj 


o 




U 






^ 


V SJ 




(T\ 


rr\ 


rt 

J3 




rr\ 






<u 






— < 




bO 


>> 










1h 




.fi 


< 


cu 


CO 


"bo 


<*> 


-d 


o 


1/5 


c 


< 


0> 


-C 


W 


<jq 


O 


Oh 


rr\ 


>^ 

o 

c/5 


m 




rf\ 


« 


x 








C/0 

"bo 


"c5 

»- 

CU 

C 


cu 
bO 




bo 
O 


c 


CU 








W 


o 


< 




s 


rr\ 


o 


rrs 




rr\ 




</0 


o 




>, 




£ 


a> 




Cu 


s 


• c/o 


£ 






E 

OS 


CO O 


js 




bO 

O 


*-. 


*c 




QJ 


O 


D cj 


< 




o 



o 
bo 

O 



^3 






<5/0 g 

I 2, 

U3 | 



S 






5 IS 








&D 




PI 




• iH 




fl 




•l-H 




<tf 


6 


?H 




H 




r— I 


O 


OS 


o 


o 


C 


w 


0) 


^ 


o 


.rj 


03 


to 



1 

Pi 



.2 




*Im 


<^> 


CU 

a 


K. 


cu 


« 


> 


<^ 


r -3. 


.^O 




>~-a 


rj 


Q 


i-~ 


•Ki 






'5 




CT 


s 


OJ 


"** 


>-* 


^3 


'70 


« 


-1— 1 




U 


•S 


ai 






st 


!2T 


■^, 


p 




Cfl 


<^ 






u 


u 
^ 


1 


•*-< 

►o 


cu 


s 


-a 


CO 


U 




rt 






<A 




tm 


< 


rt 




>> 


. 


u 




3 

a 


5 


|m| 


O 


a> 


CJ 


> 




O 






_rt 


w 


'Ut 


T3 




c 


'Si 


a) 


T3 


X 


c 


cu 








<u 




C/5 




Ui 


rt 


3 


O 


O 
o 




Xi 


wo 


o 


T3! 


rt 


5- 

rt 


UJ 


-a 








rt 


^ 




cu 


c/j 


<u 


V 


^ 


rt 


<u 


wo 


CU 






U 


<r> 


p « 


T3 


1? 


# o 


'yo 


cu 




Cu 


o 




e 


c 
<u 


o 


■4-> 


TD 


in 


rt 


cu 


O 

rt 


'C 




V5 


OJ 


3 


> 
O 




rt 








a> 


^ 


£ 


<u 


:- 


cu 




<u .3 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



31 



H 


s 


n3 


tfl sr 





3" 


O P 


CO 


!?. a* 


<" 


P^ 


< 


CD 


a> < 


CO 









H 






r 
p 


p^ 


c 

co 


3" 


3' 
3' 




O 

3 



3 


Er 




►t 


p 


3 


00" 




3 


<§. 


co 


S 




3 


re 


re 


3* 


3* 


Oq 


P 


fD 


re 


3. 




3 




O 


re 


0* 


O 




> 
—t 


3 
00 




CO 


ft 


-Q 






3. 


a 




>t" 







3 


3 

ft 




ft 


00 




3 


p* 




co 







»*» 


en 




C 







►n 


ft' 




rt> 


3 




3 









O) 




"i 






P 


P 




3 






O 
ft 


5. 




O 


> 











O 


















ro 






aq 






<T> 






co 






p 






3 






a* 






3 






3 












< 






n> 







O 


> 


9W 





CO 


i-j 


off 


►-S 


O 
P 






3 


w q 


B 


*r3 


O 


P 


& 


e+ 




^S 


*< 


a* 






CO 


05 


M b3 


CO 


s 


> 


O 


m 






m 


3 

co* 

3* 





Oq 

ft 

cr 

p 


3 














X 
















CO 








1— t- 








O 








"1 








v: 




VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


S 


O * 


CO 


w 





2 a* 


5] 


3 
OQ 




3 • 


O* 


3t 


<* 

ft 


a > 

"< Oq 


q 


co 

3* 




CD 








cr 








•1 








P 






VJJ 


^ *£ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


S 


O 


*d 


W 




m 


3" 


3 




O 


^< 


<*L 


<' 

ft 


3 

-« 


00 

(V 

co 


co* 

3- 




*< 




3 


VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


2 


m 





w 


s 



ft" 



3* 

3, 


3 


<' 


<' 


co 


3* 


a 


CD 










■-i 
*-< 


< 


VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 


VJJ 



Q 

o 

1— • 
»— * 
<t> 

o 

CD 
P 
P 



o 
o 



= < 



32 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



"Anyone who is willing to work ten hours a day at the brick-yard, or 
in the laundry, through one or two years in order that he or she may have 
the privilege of studying academic branches for two hours in the evening 
has enough bottom to warrant being further educated." 

Booker T. Washington. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 33 



Courses of Instruction 



ENGLISH 

In a practical school, the work in English is considered not the least 
practical of the various courses offered to the prospective student. To be 
an efficient citizen, one must not only be able to read intelligently, but also 
be able to give his thoughts to others plainly and concisely. The courses in 
English have been planned with a two-fold aim — to train the student in 
self-expression both in talking and in writing, and to cultivate the ability 
to read accurately and with appreciation. 

Training in self-expression is given throughout the four-year's work. 
The object of such training is to enable the pupil to express his own ideas 
freely, clearly and forcibly. As a basis, the first year student is required to 
review grammar, paying especial attention to the common mistakes found in 
written and spoken language. He studies the rules of punctuation and ap- 
plies them in his written work, thereby forming correct habits. Letters, es- 
pecially neat and exact business letters, short descriptions, stories, and 
themes, are required regularly. 

Beginning with the first year, the following requirements for written 
work are enforced. All written work must be neat and comparatively free 
from mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation. All written work is 
corrected by the teacher and criticized that the pupil may see lines for im- 
provement. The best work of each student, and certain required papers, 
are then copied into a permanent note-book. Study to improve self-expres- 
sion in the second year's work includes formal rhetoric in connection with 
more numerous and longer themes. In the third and fourth years, work in 
debating, oratory, and declamation is required. Each student keeps a 
note-book with essays and themes on the literary history and masterpieces 
studied. 

Intelligent and appreciative reading is taught by the study of selected 
masterpieces of literature. Two days out of each week are given to this in 
first year English, three days each week in the other courses. Students are 



34 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

required to read aloud often, and in each course to memorize selections 
both in prose and poetry. Altho the technical points of the various forms of 
writing are discussed, the main aim in this work is to cultivate a love for the 
really great works of literature and to give the pupil a foundation on which 
to base his later readings. 

Special attention is given in all classes to the student's spoken and 
written language. Errors in speech are corrected and explained when nec- 
essary. A pupil who, in any course, shows deficiency in grammar is re- 
quired to take it, even though he may have credit in that subject. Neat 
legible writing is required of every student; special assistance is given in 
this, if the student needs it. Important and practical as it is that the 
student should acquire the ability to enjoy the literary masters, it is deemed 
intensely practical and important that he should speak and write intelligent- 
ly and correctly. 

Courses I, II and III, are required in all Industrial Courses. Course 
IV is elective. It is strongly advised, however, that all students take four 
courses of English. 

Course I. Grammar. 

Elementary. A thorough study of theoretical and applied grammar 
with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the use of correct 
forms of speech with special attention to common errors. Elementary 
composition. 

Course II. Literature I. 

(a) Review of English grammar; three recitations a week, for three 
months. 

(b) Elementary composition and rhetoric. Letter-writing, descrip- 
tion, narration. An average of three recitations per week for six months. 
Special emphasis put upon punctuation, spelling, capitalization, paragraph 
structure, figures of speech. Numerous short compositions are required. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Macaulay's Horatius at the Bridge; 
Burroughs' Sharp Eyes; Dickens' Christmas Carol; Gray's Elegy; Haw- 
thorne's Great Stone Face, My Visit to Niagara, The Ambitious Guests, 
Old Ticonderoga, The Great Carbuncle; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; 
Hale's The Man Without a Country; Irving's Rip Van Winkle, Legend of 
Sleepy Hollow. 

For reading: Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Poe's Gold Bug; Warn- 
er's A Hunting of the Deer, How I Killed a Bear, Lost in the Woods, Camp- 
ing out. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 35 

Course III. Literature II. 

(a) Advanced composition and rhetoric, two recitations a week. Re- 
view and continued description and narration, usage, diction, clearness, 
force, elegance, paragraphing, principles of versification ; periodic, balanced, 
loose, long and short sentences ; figures of speech. Work in composition re- 
quired throughout the year. Special attention given to exposition and 
argumentation. 

(b) Masterpieces for study: Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; Burns' 
The Cotter's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, To a Mountain Daisy, For A' 
That and A' That; Epistle to J. Lapraik, Highland Mary, To Mary in 
Heaven, My Heart's in the Highlands, Bruce to His Men at Bannockburn, 
Bonnie Doon ; Addison's De Coverly Papers ; Macaulay's Milton ; Milton's 
Minor Poems; The Merchant of Venice; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. 

For reading: As You Like It, The Iliad (Books i, 6, 22, 24), The 
Lady of the Lake, Kipling's Captains Courageous. 

Course IV. Literature III. — Elective. 

(a) History of English Literature. 

(b) Written reviews are required of assigned plays and work. The 
composition work is based upon the masterpieces studied and takes the 
form of critical and biographical essays. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Burke's Conciliation, Macbeth, Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrics, Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I, and 
II., Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Bacon's Essays. 

For reading: Silas Marner, Julius Caesar, Ivanhoe; Tennyson's The 
Coming of Arthur, Launcelot and Elaine, Guinevere, The Passing of Arthur. 

Course V. Literature IV — Elective. 

(a) History of American literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library supplemented by 
text books. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are written 
and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Aldrich's Baby Bell, Ale Yeaton's Son, 
Piscataqua River, The Little Violinist, Our New Neighbors at Poukapog; 
Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a Water-fowl, A Forest Hymn, The Flood of 
Years, The Green Mountain Boys, The Yellow Violet, To the Fringed 
Gentian; Emerson's Compensation, Self-Reliance; Lincoln's First and 



36 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Second Inaugural Addresses, Gettysburg Speech, The Emancipation Pro- 
clamation; Poe's Raven and the Bells; Taylor's Lars; Webster's First 
Bunker Hill Oration, and Adams and Jefferson ; Whittier's The Tent on the 
Beach. 

For reading : Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac ; Hawthorne's House 
of Seven Gables or the Marble Faun; Lodge's Life of Webster; Parkman's 
LaSalle; Thoreau's The Succession of Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds; 
Warner's My Summer in a Garden. 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

The courses are arranged to exhibit the essential elements in historical 
growth; cause and effect; the comparison of events; the growth of institu- 
tions ; the influence of environment ; the value of the past in explaining the 
present. 

Course VI. American History. 

Europe in 1492; American colonization; the colonies; their struggles; 
the American revolution, the Union; the Civil War; industrial growth; ex- 
pansion. 

Course VII. Civics. 

Such study of the constitutional history of the United States from its 
beginning to the present time and such study of the actual conditions of 
government in city, state and nation as is essential to prepare young men to 
become responsible citizens in the republic. 

General History I. Course VIII. 

This course includes a brief survey of the Oriental nations; a earful 
study of the lessons to be learned from the most important phases of Greek 
and Roman history; and a detailed study of the Romano-Teutonic period, 
emphasizing the fusion of the Classic, the Christian and the Teutonic ele- 
ments which form the basis of the civilization of modern Europe. 

General History II. Course IX. 

The work outlined for this course is the rise and development of the 
modern nations; feudalism; the crusades; the rise of towns; the Renais- 
sance; the periods of reform in religion and of revolution in government; 
and the recent history of the principal nations of today. The aim of this 
course is to enable the student to see the relation of the past to the political, 
intellectual, religious, industrial and social conditions of the present time. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 37 

MATHEMATICS 

The aim of all the courses in mathematics is to train the student to 
think and reason for himself in an accurate and logical manner. To this 
end many original problems, requiring individual and independent effort, 
are assigned, and the student's knowledge of the subject is daily tested at 
the blackboard. Frequent reviews and quizzes are given in order that the 
various subjects may be thoroughly covered and mastered. In all courses 
the practical value of the subject is constantly emphasized and to this end 
blackboard illustrations, geometrical solids, and instruments of various 
kinds are employed, supplemented by oral explanations and informal 
lectures. By these means the study of mathematics is rendered easier to 
understand and more interesting to the student, while at the same time 
the utility of the subject and its applicability to problems in daily life are 
demonstrated. Ample time is devoted to all the courses offered in mathe- 
matics in order that the treatment of each may be as comprehensive and 
thorough as possible. 

Course X. Arithmetic. 

A complete review of the essentials of arithmetic including the funda- 
mental processes, factoring, fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, 
longitude and time, practical measurements and precentage, together with 
the best methods of presenting these various subjects to pupils of the public 
schools. All abstract combinations are preceded, as far as possible, by con- 
structive effort and the work made objective. In the more advanced 
themes the subjects will be treated as they occur in actual business trans- 
actions regardless of text book limits. 

Course XI. Arithmetic. (Short Course) 

Industrial Arithmetic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon problems 
pertaining to the farm. The work will involve factors, fractions, decimals, 
denominate numbers, practical measurements and percentage Problems 
dealing with such themes as the cost of buildings, marketing, measurements, 
insurance, taxes and banking will be taught in the most practical business- 
like fashion. Daily through the Winter Term. 

Course XII. Algebra. 

All elementary algebra is covered up to quadratic equations, especial 
emphasis being laid on the fundamental processes of addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division. The relation of arithmetic to algebra is con- 
stantly kept in mind and the advantages of algebra noted. 



38 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course XIII. Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

The first half of the year is devoted to the completion of algebra, which 
includes the study of quadratics, ratio, proportion and progressions, and 
also a complete review of the whole suBject. Plane geometry is then taken 
up and the student is thoroughly grounded in the fundamental principles 
of the subject. Especial attention is paid to original exercises and prob- 
lems in construction, the object being to develop the student's ingenuity and 
reasoning powers. 

Course XIV. Plane Geometry. 

Geometry, inductive and deductive. Methods or reasoning; the classi- 
fication of the various geometrical forms, lines, angles and surfaces and the 
various kinds of proofs. The relation of Geometry to Arithmetic. Especial 
emphasis on original and inventive work. The method of original demon- 
stration through analysis, construction and proof. 

Course XV. Solid Geometry. 

One-half year is devoted to the completion of plane geometry and the 
second half year to solid geometry. In order that the latter subject may be 
more easily grasped and comprehended, geometrical solids are employed in 
the demonstration of each proposition, and the students are also required, 
from time to time, to fashion out of cardboard various solids for use in 
demonstrating problems in construction. 

SCIENCE 

The courses are designed to instruct the student in the facts, laws and 
methods of nature. The intimate relation that applied science bears to 
every day life indicates the imperative need of such courses in a general 
scheme of education. 

The biological laboratory occupies a part of the third floor of Carnegie 
Hall. The room is 30x60 feet, well lighted, and provided with desk room 
and apparatus to accommodate forty pupils. 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters on the fourth floor of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room and appa- 
ratus, and has, at one end, a dark room 25x35 feet conveniently arranged 
for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Carnegie Hall. It 
is sufficiently equipped with table room and apparatus for thirty students 
working at one time. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 39 

Laboratory and field work in the sciences is always a welcome and 
profitable diversion from continued study and recitation in the class room. 
The laboratory and field work are carefully directed so that observation and 
inference may be comprehensive and accurate. The methods of instruction 
are those of modern laboratories for which the equipment is ample. 

The following courses are offered, four years of which are constants for 
graduation. 

Course XVI. Geography. 

A comprehensive and critical review of descriptive geography. The 
first half of the year is devoted to an extensive comparison of the topograph- 
ical features, the commercial advantages, and the development of indus- 
tries of the different countries of the earth. 

Course XVII. Physical Geography. 

The second half of the year is devoted to a study of the earth as a 
globe. Especial emphasis is laid upon the study of the constant changes 
apparent in the earth's surface, the various physical ages of the earth, the 
underlying causes, and effect upon man-kind. As far as possible the most 
fundamental principles of this subject are brought out by actual observa- 
tion in field work. 

Course XVIII. Agriculture A. 

Elementary. The study of the plant; classes of plants; important 
farm crops; useful and harmful insects, birds; weather and the farm; the 
soil; domestic animals of the farm; care for live stock. Fall and Winter 
Terms. 

Course XIX. Agriculture B. 

Five hours a week for the winter term. Designed to accommodate 
young men from the farm who enter late in the Fall and leave early in the 
Spring. Lectures, recitations and experiments. Emphasis is laid upon kinds 
of soil ; soil and water ; how plants feed and grow ; the selection and germina- 
tion of seeds; requirements in the growth of seedlings; conservation of 
moisture ; soil fertility ; varieties of stock and stock breeding, etc. 

Course XX. Agriculture C. 

A study of soils, their origin, physical properties, drainage and irriga- 
tion, etc.; farm crops, grouped and studied; animal husbandry; dairying. 
A comprehensive view of the subject. Daily throughout the year. 



40 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course XXI. Zoology. 

Five hours a week for the first half of the year. The course is designed 
as a foundation for advanced scientific work. Lectures and recitations 
cover the principle facts of animal structure and classification. Illustra- 
tions are given by means of museum specimens, wall charts, slides and 
stereoptican views. The student does individual laboratory work studying 
typical representatives of the main branches of the animal kingdom. At- 
tention is also given to the speculative questions of the science. 

Course XXII. Botany. 

Five hours a week for the last half of the year. The work covers seed 
germination, the structure, development and distribution of plants together 
with a study of the types of various plant groups beginning with the simpler 
forms. Specimens of the higher form of plants are studied and classified in 
the laboratory. Especial attention is given to a study of the relation of 
the vegetable to the animal kingdom. 

Course XXIII. Physiology. 

Physiology and Hygiene is offered five hours per week for one term. 
The general physical structure of the human body is studied carefully. 
The processes of nutrition, circulation, excretion and respiration are exam- 
ined in detail. Experiments and dissections are carried on with as much 
detail as is necessary to get an insight into the vital processes of life. 
Hygiene is made an important part of the work. This subject is required 
of all students taking the Normal Course or the Home Economics Course. 

Course XXIV. Physics A. 

Five hours a week for the year. This course consists of lectures, ex- 
periments and recitations. The experiments are simple, yet full and exhaus- 
tive. Especial attention is given to the solution of problems involving 
physical laws and formulae. A series of forty-eight experiments is pre- 
scribed and performed by students during the year and careful tabulations 
are made of the results. Especial attention is given to the fundamentals 
that lead up to the various courses in engineering. 

Course XXV. Physics B. — General Chemistry. 

Five hours a week for the year. Lectures will be given to cover the 
more advanced work in mechanics, the practical appliances on heat, light, 
and electricity and the more complex formulae for solving. Physical prob- 
lems. Laboratory work will be given, which has especial bearing on the 




ft. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 41 

topics studied and which will be of particular benefit to the student special- 
izing in the Mechanic Arts. Prequisite Physics A. 

Five hours a week for six months. Three periods a week are devoted 
to the study of the laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles of 
chemistry and to the solution of problems in chemical arithmetic. Two 
double periods each week are devoted to laboratory work. Over one 
hundred experiments involving chemical change, affinity, valence, etc., are 
performed and noted so that the student both becomes familiar with the 
manipulation of apparatus and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

Course XXVI. Qualitative Analysis. 

Daily for the first four and one-half months. Lecture once a week. 
Laboratory work four times a week. The course consists of a systematic 
study of the bases, and elements and radicals, and a method of analyzing an 
unknown substance of complex composition. Emphasis is placed on such 
methods as can be used in quantitative determinations. Prerequisites 
General Chemistry and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

Course XXVII. Quantitative Analysis. 

Five times a week for the last half of the year. Two and one-half 
months given to gravimetric analysis and two months given to valumetric 
analysis. Some simple substance that illustrate the fundamentals of quan- 
titative work, are taken up first. Then such as pig iron, steel, cement, soil, 
water for potable purposes, water for boiler purposes are analyzed. Prere- 
quisites General Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis and Elementary Qualita- 
tive Analysis. 

Course XXVIII. Bacteriology. 

Five hours a week for the Spring term. Arranged to meet the needs 
of domestic science students. Recitations and experiments. The yeast 
plant is studied in all the important details of its life habits. Especial at- 
tention is given to the moulds and bacteria of the household. The life hab- 
its of the bacilli, their relations to health and disease, the precautions that 
should be taken in preventing infection are dealt with extensively. 

EDUCATION 

Course XXIX. Elementary Pedagogy. 

A brief course in the principles and methods of teaching and general 
school management offered to students who are unable to remain in school 



42 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

a sufficient length of time to complete a full course. This course includes a 
brief study of the presentative, representative and reflective powers; the 
ends of education; the means; the principles involved; general methods; 
methods in particular branches, etc. 

Course XXX. Psychology. 

Introductory Psychology. This course purposes to give the general 
characteristics and laws of mental life, the functions of the various mental 
processes, and the aims and methods of modern psychology. Special em- 
phasis is placed upon physiological psychology. The work involves text- 
book work, lectures and essays. 

Advanced Psychology. The study of mental development in its rela- 
tion to heredity and environment — the physical nature of the child, his in- 
stincts and capacities with their individual variations. 

Course XXXI. History of Education. 

A study of the educational systems of the chief nations of antiquity; 
education in its relation to Christianity; the Renaissance, the Reformation 
and the forces operative in our own era ; a study of the life and practices of 
the chief educational reformers in the light of prevailing theories. Numer- 
ous outside readings and class reviews are required. 

Course XXXII. Philosophy of Education. 

A study of the agencies of civilization ; the broad conception of educa- 
tion; the biological, physiological, sociological and psychological aspects of 
education. Especial attention is given to such themes as the Place of the 
Body in Education, the Influence of Body on Mind, Physical Education, 
Environment, Racial Experience, and the Notion of Self-Activity. 

Course XXXIII. Economics of Manual Training. 

Spring Term, two periods per week. The organization of manual 
training in public school courses, aim and practice, the history and litera- 
ture of manual training; equipment and supplies; correlation; manual train- 
ing and mental development ; instruction and control, etc. 

Course XXXIV. Reviews and Methods. 

The subject matter of arithmetic, grammar, history and geography re- 
viewed ; the principles and methods of teaching emphasized. The work is 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 43 

especially designed to train students to teach. The subject matter, teacher's 
aim, method, preparation and presentation are carefully considered with 
special reference to the grades. 

Course XXXV. Reviews and Methods. 

A continuation of the above course, Fall and Winter Terms. 

Course XXXVI. Observation and Practice. 

Designed to train prospective teachers in the principles and methods of 
effective teaching. The opportunity for observation and practice teaching is 
found in the classes of the preparatory department, the department of man- 
ual training, and the department of domestic science and arts. Both obser- 
vation and practice take place under the direct supervision of a trained 
teacher, who is thoroughly capable not only of directing the efforts of pupil- 
teachers but of offering the most helpful and painstaking criticism. 

Course XXXVII. Sociology. 

This course naturally follows Civics. A general study of the 
basic principles of sociology, and of the definitions, impulse and uses 
of the science, is followed by class and individual topic work on the great 
sociological problems of present day life. Wide reading of the best authori- 
ties, both in books and periodicals of standard worth, is required. 

The following topics are included in the work covered: Immigration, 
social and industrial co-operation; sociological phases of the labor ques- 
tion ; woman's place in the industrial world ; child labor ; socialism ; organ- 
ized charity including the Hull House movement; criminology; social as- 
pects of the theatre; play ground associations; the church and school as 
social centers ; the Negro problem ; divorce ; the liquor problem. Education 
as the only safe basis of democratic government is the final theme of the 
course. 

LATIN 

The study of the Latin language has given character to modern minds 
by the habits of discrimination and analysis which it requires, and has 
largely contributed to the marked advancement of science and reasoning. 
To represent it as nothing but a criticism of words or an exercise of memo- 
ry is utterly erroneous. It demands clearness of judgment and admits of 
operations even of fancy, picturing things of which words are but symbols, 
and tends to promote quickness and depth of comprehension. The analysis 



44 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

of language cultivates acuteness and pre-eminent literary taste, and inspires 
the student with a love of research. In Latin is found the strength, precis- 
ion and order of the old Roman. Attention is given to correct writing, the 
study of idioms and synonyms, translations into English and the history of 
its literature. The relation of the language to English is always kept in 
mind and similarities noted. 

Course XXXVIII. LATIN I. 

The elements. Daily throughout the year. Careful study and practice 
in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections and syntax, a gaining of a work- 
ing vocabulary. Translating of simple prose. Much time and emphasis is 
placed upon the translation of English into Latin. Word formation also 
receives considerable attention. 

Course XXXIX. Latin II. 

Caesar. Daily throughout the year. Four books ; translation into clear 
idiomatic English; construction of every word; the life of Caesar; the 
Roman government of his time; the formation of the Roman army; sight 
reading; prose composition based upon the text of Caesar. 

Course XL. Latin III. 

Daily throughout the year. Six orations; four In Catalinam, De 
Imperio Pompei or Pro Marcello and Pro Archia; the Life of Cicero; the 
history of his time; Roman oratory; syntax of each word; sight reading; 
prose composition based on the text; memorizing of especial passages of 
Pro Archia. 

Course XLI. Latin IV. 

Vergil — Elective. Daily throughout the year. Six books of the 
Aeneid; syntax; grammatical peculiarities; translation into clear idomatic 
English ; occasional metrical translation ; the life of Vergil ; the history of 
his times, the mythology of the Aeneid the versification of the Aeneid. 

GERMAN 

The course is designed to enable the student to use this language with 
facility in ordinary reading, writing and speaking; to supply the mental 
training only to be obtained by a study of language other than one's own ; 
to give the student a key to the riches of German literature. Accuracy and 
facility of translation are sought by means of a careful grammatical drill 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 45 

and a generous amount of reading. Composition forms a necessary part of 
the instruction. Especial emphasis is laid upon the acquiring of a correct 
pronunciation. The class is conducted in German. 

Course XLII. Elementary German. 

For beginners. Special attention is given to correct pronunciation, 
the principles of grammar, the conversion of simple prose from German into 
English and from English into German, and to conversation exercises. 

Collar's First Year German. 

Bacon's Im Vaterland. 

Course XLIII. German Reading. 

Review of the grammar; practice in translating from German into 
idiomatic English; written exercises based on a text. Joynes-Meissner's 
Grammar; Hans Anderson's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, Storm's Immensee, 
Gers Tacker's Germalshausen, Dillard's Ausdem deutschen Dichterwald, 
Heyse's L' Arrabiata, Benedix's Die Hochesilreiss, Schiller's Der Neffe als 
Onkel, etc., etc. 

Course XLIV. Classic German. 

Joynes-Meissner's Grammar. Suderman's Johannes; Lessing's Minna 
von Barnhelm; Goethe's Egmont; Freytag's Die Journalisten, Scholler's 
Wilhelm Tell, etc., etc. 

MECHANIC ARTS 

Including professional or teachers' courses in 
MANUAL TRAINING 

The principal object in this department is to give thoro and practical 
training in the mechanic arts with special reference to the industries of 
North Dakota. Incidentally it prepares young men for technical courses in 
higher institutions. 

Another object is to train teachers of industrial or vocational subjects 
for the public schools of the state. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this work ; no 
school in the state is so well equipped. The shops and laboratories are well 
supplied with every modern appliance which can aid in acquiring practical 
knowldge of industrial subjects. A visit will convince. 



46 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

The following outline contains material for three courses : The Mechan- 
ic Arts Course — four years — subjects marked (m) ; The Short Course in 
Farm Mechanics— three months — subjects marked (s) ; The Professional 
Course — five years — including everything in the outline. 

Note: Ninety minutes' work daily constitutes one year's credit. 

Course XLV. Hand- Work for the Primary Grades. 

( 1 ) Paper and cardboard construction. This work is taken up as 
it should be presented in the public schools. The different steps in paper 
folding are given, developing into the construction of familiar articles. The 
use of paste and scissors is developed early in the course. Freehand cutting 
is given for training the eye in regard to form and for composition. Port- 
folios, booklets, boxes, etc., are constructed of heavy paper and cardboard. 

(2) Clay modeling and pottery. Some training is given in model- 
ing type forms from simple objects in nature. The greater share of the 
time is devoted to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces involving 
different methods of construction. In the third and fourth grades simple 
incised ornament is studied. The class is instructed in the craft of mould 
made pieces and a few pieces are made by the class. Students glaze a part 
of their work. 

(3) Weaving and basketry. Weaving begins with the use of paper 
mats, different patterns being worked out in several media. The materials 
included are raffia, jute, common woolen yarns and, for the fourth grade, 
hand-dyed worsted of the finest quality. Problems include pencil bags, 
book bags, holders, mats, special designed rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. 
Basketry consists of the problems used in elementary grades, simple rattan 
mats and baskets, handles, hinges, etc. Coiled mats and simple baskets 
are executed and a few methods of using raffia and constructive work are 
illustrated. 

(4) Thin wood construction. The assembling of thin pieces of 
wood by means of glue and brads to form miniature pieces of furniture ; the 
construction of a miniature house. The work consists, in part, of a combin- 
ation of wood and cardboard. 

Course XLVI. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar 
Grades. 

(1) Woodwork for fourth and fifth grades. The purpose here 
is to train the prospective teacher in the simpler processes in wood con- 
struction. 





titi^ fci^r fern • 


. 114 > JJP"*- - ■•* i^ % fill 







o 

s 

■a, 
<0 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 47 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction intended to 
appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, they are graded, but 
some opportunity is given, as in all courses, for original design. The work 
is similar in character to courses offered in the elementary grades of any 
first class public school system. The tools used are the knife, block plane, 
back saw, coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, 
hammer, rule and pencil. For most of the exercises the material is prepared 
in thickness before given to the student. Workmanlike methods are aimed 
at ; blue prints of the course are made. 

(2) Woodwork for the sixth, seventh and eighth grades. 
Here serious attention is first given to following the methods of the skilled 
mechanic. It is the aim to keep always in mind the interest and capacity 
of the pupils to be taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the public schools 
where there is an equipment of workbenches and a rather full set of tools. 
In the seventh and eighth grades there are numerous exercises in cabinet 
making in which the simpler methods of joinery are involved. The use of 
sandpaper, filler, stains and varnish is introduced in finishing some of the 
pieces. 

Course XL VII. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full ^Mechanic 
Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive exercises in Joinery, 
Advanced Cabinet Design and Construction, Wood Carving, Hammered 
Metal Work, Drawing and Design. 

(1) Joinery. (M and S) 

(a) Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand tools used 
by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, chisel, hammer, 
square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and other hand tools, in the con- 
struction of the principal joints employed in carpentry and joinery. 

(b) When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful articles 
are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

(c) Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a desk, table, 
bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order that they may make 
further application of the principles they have learned. 

(d) Advanced cabinet making ; practice in the application of the prin- 
ciples of Joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, settees, stands, ped* 
estals and cabinets of various designs. Pieces to be finished in approved 
manner. 



4$ NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(2) Turnery. (M) 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, screw, 
hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises through which the 
difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, concave curve, 
convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turning, together with exer- 
cises combining either a number, or all, of these operations, (b) Useful 
articles in which the principles learned in (a) are applied, including a box 
with cover, a vase, handles for various tools, a mallet, spindles for porch 
work or furniture, stair balusters and various other useful articles. This 
work is carried further in its application in pattern marking. 

(3) Forging. (M and S) 

(a) Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming angles from 
straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms of welding iron and 
mild steel. 

(b) This course includes a number of useful articles, including a 
bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, clevis, cold chisel, 
heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making and temper- 
ing machine tools. 

(4) Tinsmithing. (M and S) 

The course in tinsmithing is supplementary to a part of the course in 
drawing and is to give practice in cutting and making proper allowances 
for lap and so forth. Sufficient practice is given in soldering to enable the 
student to execute all ordinary work that can be done with simple equip- 
ment, such as repairing tin and copper vessels. 

(5) Hammered metal work. 

This course offers instruction in the manipulation of sheet metal. The 
work is carried out with copper and brass; silver may be used at the 
students' expense. Attention is directed to the different processes of the 
work, such as hammering, repousse, sawing, filing, stamping, riveting, sol- 
dering and etching. The problems include the forming of bowls, trays, 
plates, desk sets, candlesticks, inkwells and so forth. 

(6) Patternmaking. (M) 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given to the 
work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made of a number of 
models which involve the more elementary problems in foundry practice; 
these are followed by patterns of parts of machines, including a hand-wheel 
and blanks for a cam, gear-wheel and bevel-gear. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 49 

(7) Chipping and filing. (M) 

(a) Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill in the use 
of the file and the cold-chisel. These tools are of especial value in almost 
every line of mechanical work, as for instance, in erecting or repairing ma- 
chinery whether in the shop or on the farm. Their usefulness is so well 
known, and the inability of the average man to use them properly is also 
so well known, that it seems proper to give them especial attention in this 
course. 

(b) In connection with and in addition to the above a number of use- 
ful articles are made from sheet steel. 

(8) Machine shop practice. (M and S) 

(a) Machine tool making. Students make and temper the tools which 
they will use in their Machine Tool Practice. 

(b) Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms of machine 
tools, directions for operating machines and keeping tools in order ; practice 
in centering and in plain, taper, and template turning, chucking, drilling, 
boring, external and internal thread cutting; hand tool turning, polishing 
and filing. 

(c) Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling machine, 
indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, micrometer and Vernier cali- 
pers in the construction of reamers, taps and dies, machine screws, nuts, 
studs and formed work. In this course the machine work is done on the 
articles cast in the foundry during the preceding year. The greater share 
of the machine tool practice of the entire course consists in machining the 
products of the foundry. 

(d) Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, a lathe, 
or some other project involving similar operations. 

Course XL VIII. Drawing and Design. 

( 1 ) Manual training design. Study of the elements of design, line, 
dark and light and color and the application of the principles of harmony. 
The object of the instruction is to develop appreciation through the study of 
art-structure. The course begins with design in the abstract, harmonious 
arrangement of spaces being given special attention. Application of the 
theory of design in technical problems; designs for furniture; textiles, wall 
coverings, stained glass, interiors, etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 

(2) Mechanical drawing — first year. (3 hours per week) (M) 
(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 



50 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

(b) Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instruments, with 
practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

(c) Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, also 
mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in mechanical drawing ; 
especial attention given to accuracy of construction. 

(d) Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of planes in 
projection. This work, which is part of descriptive geometry, is the imme- 
diate foundation of mechanical drawing. In connection with it students 
are required to bring to class shop sketches or freehand working drawings 
of various articles. Instrumental drawings are made from some of these 
sketches. 

(3) Mechanical drawing — second year. (3 hours per week) (M) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, properly 
lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental drawings, made to scale, 
from sketches in (1). 

(c) Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

(4) Mechanical drawing — third year. (3 hours per week) (M) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Descriptive geometry. Graphical methods of solving problems of 
lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application in sheet metal pattern 
making. Problems include patterns of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, 
a T and a Y joint. All articles in this course, of which patterns are made, 
are constructed either of metal or paper. 

(c) Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story frame 
dwelling or other frame building. This course is made very practical. 
After the rough sketches have been made, the floor, basement and footing 
plans are drawn to scale, also sectional wall views showing the construc- 
tion ; and at least two views of the completed structure — the drawings in- 
cluding roof plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are 
drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building materials and labor is 
made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the complete set of plans. 
Special students are carrying this work further and are actually building 
models in the shop, in which the methods of construction are identical 
with those used in actual house building. 

(5) Mechanical drawing — fourth year. (3 hours per week) (M) 
(a) Lettering and conventional representations of frequently recurring 

parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, etc. 




Class in Joinery 




Class in Mechanical Drawing 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 5 I 

(b) Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in projection of 
complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct dimensions supplied 
from measurements. Sketches to be neat and clear and dimensions properly 
placed. 

(c) Working drawings from sketches. Finished working drawing 
from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings to be inked, others to 
be traced and from the tracings blue prints made. 

(d) Machine design. Students to make original design of mechanical 
appliance or machine. 

Course XLIX. Engines (m and s). 

A study of the different types of steam engines, single, double, simple 
and compound, advantages and disadvantages of each. The steam valve, 
its motion and the different mechanisms by which the motion is obtained. 

(a) Appliances. A thorough study of the hydrostatic and mechani- 
cal methods of supplying lubrication. The indicator as a means of study- 
ing pressure, correct valve setting, the construction and application of the 
Prony brake, tests for both indicated and brake horse-power. 

(&) Speed regulating device. The study of the different forms of 
governors, weights, springs and dash-pots. The application of certain 
forms of governors to certain kinds of engines. Engine practice. 

Course L. Boilers (m and s). 

The study of the more common types of boilers, safety devices, feed 
pumps, feed water heaters and injectors, boiler testing, boiler repairs and 
boiler compounds, furnaces, grates, stokers and ask handling machinery. 
Boiler practice. 

Course LI. Gas Engines (m and s). 

Gas engine principles, types and regulating devices; methods of igni- 
tion. In this course special attention will be given to the adjustment of 
working parts supplemented by talks on gas engine fuels and their manu- 
facture. Gas Engine practice. 

Course LII. Power Transmission (m and s). 

The various methods employed in the transmission of power and the 
application of the more common types; shaftings and bearings; babbitting; 
couplings; pulleys; tooth and friction gears; clutches; rope and chain 
drives; belts and belting; splicing and lacing; practical problems in figur- 



52 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

ing the size and speed of pulleys for required conditions of work, belt 
slippage and preventatives. 

DOMESTIC ARTS AND SCIENCE. 

The course is designed to afford instruction in the subjects which per- 
tain to life in the home. The training to be obtained through motor activity 
is regarded as one of the principal educational functions of both domestic 
science and art; the sociological and ethical value of such work is empha- 
sized. 

The department occupies the entire Home Economics Building with 
sewing rooms, kitchen, dining and recitation room and fitting room. 

The sewing rooms are large, well lighted and commodious. They are 
equipped with sewing machines, lockers, charts, cutting tables, individual 
tables, dress forms and wall cases for the purpose of exhibiting the work, 
etc. The best fashion magazines are received regularly. 

The kitchen is supplied with desks for individual work, equipped with 
all the necessary cooking utensils ; gas stoves for individual use ; gas range ; 
wood range ; refrigerator ; cupboards ; kitchen cabinet ; sink, and the cooking 
utensils necessary to provide the best facilities for class work. 

The dining room is equipped with dining table, dining chairs, china 
closet, buffet, etc. It is also supplied with china, silver, linen, etc. 

The recitation room is supplied with reference books, charts and maga- 
zines devoted to the subject of domestic science. 

Course LIII. Plain Sewing. 

A beginning course in sewing. Elements of plain and fancy hand 
sewing. Use and care of sewing machines. Each student is expected to 
complete a four-piece suit of cotton underwear, one tailored shirtwaist, one 
fancy cotton waist and one simple cotton dress. Students draft all their 
own patterns to exact measures. Students are required to provide them- 
selves with Snow's Success Drafting System. 

At odd times during the year students have opportunity to acquire 
a practical working knowledge of household sewing, including towels, pillow 
cases and table linen, etc. Students furnish all their own materials. 

'Course LIV. Dressmaking A. 

Advanced Course in Sewing. A thorough study in foundation pattern 
drafting. Practice in designing patterns of any desired style. Several 
weeks are given over entirely to pattern making and designing. 




Class in Cooking 




Class in Sewing 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 53 

Each student is required to make at least one fancy woolen or silk 
waist, one tailored skirt, one woolen dress and one fancy cotton dress. 
Students are required to furnish all their own materials. 

Course LV. Dressmaking. 

A half-day daily throughout the winter term. Instruction is given in: 
( i ) Hand Sewing. Making of simple garments by hand to illustrate 
the use of plain and fancy stitches. 

(2) Dressmaking. Cutting, fitting and making of waists and dresses ; 
thorough drill in pattern drafting and dressmaking; choice and suitability 
of dress materials ; color and color combinations. While the degree of skill 
acquired depends upon the individual, a pupil of average ability should be 
able to master the elements of dressmaking by diligent application during 
the term. Open only to short course students. 

Course LVI Domestic Art Design. 

The elements of design ; line, light, shade, color ; principles of harmony ; 
the appreciation of structure. The course, in part, is devoted to the appli- 
cation of the theory of design to technical problems such as designs for 
basketry, rugs, wall decoration, textiles, stenciling, etc. Required in Normal 
Courses. 

Course LVII. Applied Design. 

The elements of design applied in construction and surface decoration. 
The instruction follows two lines: a study of the principles of design in 
the abstract, color theory being given special attention, and the application 
of the principles in technical problems such as art needlework, applique 
pillows, table runners, designs for embroidered shirt waists, towels, belts, etc. 
Required in Industrial Courses. 

Course LVIII. Domestic Science A. 

An elementary course in cookery. Classification of foods. Scientific 
principles underlying the cooking and digestion of each class of foods. 

Laboratory practice in cooking, table setting and serving. Three two- 
hour periods in laboratory, and two one-hour recitation periods each week 
throughout the year. This course must be accompanied or preceded by a 
course in chemistry. 



54 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course LIX. Domestic Science B. 

Cookery. Daily throughout the winter term. A study of the under- 
lying principles of cooking. Daily practice in cooking, table setting, serv- 
ing and buying. Open to short course students. 

Course LX. Advanced Cooking. 

Food preservation — canning, preserving, jelly making and pickling. 
Fancy cookery. A brief study of food values. Use of carbohydrate fats, 
proteids, mineral matter and water in the body. Invalid diet and prepara- 
tion of trays suitable for special diseases. 

Lectures and recitations on Home Nursing. 

Daily throughout first semester. This course is accompanied by a 
course in Bacteriology. 

Course LXI. Home Economics. 

Investigation into household problems. Location of house, heating, 
lighting, ventilating. Elementary housekeeping and furnishing. Open only 
to students who have completed courses in Elementary and Advanced 
Cooking. 

Course LXII. Teachers' Training 'Course. 

This course is planned to prepare students to teach either Domestic 
Science or Domestic Art. 

It includes: Cost and choice of equipments, courses of study, lesson 
plans, running expenses, practice teaching, and individual criticism. 

Open only to senior students who are completing the Five Year's 
Course in Domestic Science. Two periods a week during second semester. 

Course LXIII. Mechanical Drawing. 

The purpose of this course is to give sufficient knowledge of mechani- 
cal drawing and methods of construction to enable girls to plan and make 
working drawings of household articles, cabinets and furniture; also to 
plan and make drawings of a frame cottage. 

DRAWING AND FINE ARTS. 

The department offers thorough instruction in fine and decorative 
arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the second floor of Carnegie Hall, 
and there is ample equipment of casts and studio furnishings. The de- 
partment aims to give thorough instruction in the principles of drawing and 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



0"> 



painting; to enlarge the student's acquaintance with what is best in art; to 
offer courses of instruction adapted to the needs of teachers in the public 
schools and supervisors of art instruction in city schools. With serious 
study a high degree of efficiency and technical knowledge may be attained 
here at a much less expense than would be incurred for similar instruction 
in a large city. 

Course LXIV. Fine Arts. 

A general course in appreciation and combining the essentials in draw- 
ing, painting and composition. A study of form using different media — 
charcoal, pencil, water color and oil. Still life and flower painting in 
water color. Study of composition by using flowers and landscapes. Figure 
sketching, advanced composition and illustration in charcoal and water 
color. 

Course LXV. Normal Art. 

Study of form by use of charcoal, pencil and color; color theory; hue, 
intensity and textile values; relation of complementary colors, etc.; simple 
design problems based on public school work, illustrating the uses of the 
elements and principles of design. Landscape in black and white, study of 
values working from black and white up to five and seven tones; figure 
sketching ; illustrating. 

Course LXVI. Metal Work. 

The problems given are considered in relation to each other in order 
to develop a general knowledge of sheet metal work. Processes include 
forming, sawing, filing and building by hard and soft soldering, riveting, 
etc., together with the study of the processes of repousee, etching and 
coloring. 

Course LXVII. Pottery. 

The course begins with the building of hand-made pieces of different 
sizes and shapes ; the making of tiles together with decoration by relief and 
incised lines; building of pilaster models; casting of moulds and pouring 
and finishing of mould-made pieces. Students glaze and fire a part of their 
work. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial School com- 
prises instruction in piano, voice, chorus v/ork, harmony, history of music, 



$6 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

music theory and science of music. The system is based on that of the 
principal conservatories of Europe. Special efforts are made to make 
clear to the students the importance of technical work and the study of 
touch, accentuation and tone coloring. This leads to an understanding 
of what it means to interpret music and a thorough conception of the art 
of expression and artistic execution. The main purpose of the piano study 
is to make the student understand what music is; make them understand 
that music, like all other art, must touch the soul of man, or interpret the 
soul of man — and be an expression of character, personality and individ- 
uality. 

Course LXVIII. Preparatory. 

Course in hand culture; major scales; Byer's method for beginners, 
or Czerny Op. 599. 

Course LXIX. First Year. 

Elementary technic; Loeschern Op. 65; Lichner Sonatinas, album of 
instructive and interesting pieces. 

Course LXX. Second Year. 

Elementary technic continued; Loeschern Op. 66; Heller Op. 47; 
albums of instructive and interesting pieces by the best composers. 

Course LXXI. Junior Year. 

Plaidy Technical Studies; Cramer Octave Studies; Heller Op. 47; 
Czerny School of Velocity Op. 299 ; Haydn and Mozart Sonatas. Selections 
from Schumann, Grieg, Heller, Nevin and others. 

(Course LXXII. Senior Year. 

Advanced technical work continued; Cramer Studies; Mozart and 
Beethoven Sonatas; Selections from Chopin, Schumann, Bach, Liszt, Ruben- 
stein and other modern and classical composers. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

The course in vocal music is designed to afford a thorough and com- 
prehensive training in the elements ; to secure accuracy and rapidity in sight 
reading and singing; to develop a taste for the best grades of music, and 
to prepare students to teach the subject systematically in all grades of the 
public schools. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 57 

Course LXXIII. Public School Music. 

Designed to enable students to teach such principles of music as will 
apply in the several grades of the public schools. Instruction is given in 
time, tune, technique and the aesthetics of music. These subjects are ex- 
emplified in practice. Emphasis is laid upon the elements, theory of scale 
formation, melodic construction, elements of notation and harmony. The 
student becomes thoroughly familiar with the best in grade music. Daily 
throughout the year. 

Course, LXXIV. Choral Singing. 

Daily chorus practice for a brief period is given the entire school. 
This class is made up of the entire body of students and attendance is com- 
pulsory. Constant practice is had on such compositions as lie within the 
range and understanding of the pupils. Daily throughout the year. 

COMMERCIAL ARTS. 

We live in a great commercial country and there is today a rapidly 
increasing demand for trained men and women. Bookkeepers, Stenographers, 
Typewriters, Clerks and Office Assistants are needed in every avenue of 
business. The time required to fit one's self in these lines is so compara- 
tively short that any young man or young woman can afford to avail himself 
or herself of the opportunity. One drawback has been the expense. Few 
young men and women feel that they can afford the excessive fees charged 
by the numerous business schools. Such schools are organized as a busi- 
ness venture; they offer instruction in but a few branches and have no 
other means of support. Living expenses are high and the tuition for the 
various courses often seems excessive. The State Normal-Industrial School 
is located in a school town; living expenses are reasonable; there is no 
tuition ; the courses are thorough, practical and comprehensive. 

Business Course. 

Bookkeeping Business Forms 

Business Arithmetic Penmanship 

Spelling Correspondence 

Commercial Law Mimeographing 

Commercial Geography Rapid Calculation 



58 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course LXXV. Spelling (1 hr. per day, 3 terms). 

Spelling is made one of the important subjects. Work is given in 
both written and oral spelling. The class is carefully drilled in pronuncia- 
tion and in the marking and defining of words. A text-book is used. 

Course LXXVI. Penmanship (1 hr. per day, 3 terms). 

Students are taught the plain, rapid and legible style of penmanship 
which the business world demands. Instruction is given regarding position 
of body, hand, pen, paper, movements and best letter forms. 

Course LXXVII. Bookkeeping (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

The forms used in this course are those of the largest, best known and 
most progressive business firms' in our cities. The student begins with 
double entry, learning to journalize, post, take a trial balance, close the 
ledger and make a balance sheet and statement of the personal accounts. 
He then begins with single entry, learns to change the books from double 
to single entry and vice versa, and becomes familiar with the day book, 
journal, cash book and special ruled journals and cash books. He is trained 
in the use of partnership sets, special ruled books, bill books, invoice books, 
sales books, retailing, wholesaling, and during the latter part of the course 
the time is devoted to the lumber business, banking and the building and 
loan business. Careful instruction is given in writing commercial papers 
and business forms. 

Course LXXVIII. Commercial Arithmetic (1 hr. per day, 3 
terms). 

A thorough review of the entire subject with special reference to the 
needs of accountants. Fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, per- 
centage, interest, partial payments, stocks, insurance, etc., are reviewed 
and business methods and rapid calculation given special attention. 

Course LXXIX. Commercial Geography (1 hr. per day, 1% 
terms). 

The instruction in commercial geography covers the natural and in- 
dustrial resources of all important countries, the routes and means of com- 
munication, imports and exports, the consular service, etc. 

Course LXXX. Commercial Law (1 hr. per day, iy 2 terms). 

The student is taught that every person is amenable to the law and 
entitled to its protection, and that he should have a reasonable knowledge 




I 

-Si 

a. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 59 

of it in so far as it may apply to contracts, agencies, partnerships, sale of 
goods, bailments, negotiable instruments, interest, usury, transportation, 
guarantee, surety, corporations, joint stock companies, insurance, real estate, 
etc., and a wholesome regard for its enforcement. 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING. 

Course LXXXI. Shorthand (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

Students desiring to pursue this subject should enroll at the beginning 
of the school year. This course embraces a thorough drill in combining the 
signs into words, phrases and sentences, drills for speed, practice in tran- 
scribing notes, class and office dictation, and in the training necessary for 
the amanuensis and reporter. The Pitman system of shorthand is taught 
together with such improvements as have stood the test of the most severe 
requirements of the reporter's art. The debating clubs, chapel exercises and 
the routine of the county court, when in session, furnish excellent oppor- 
tunity for practice. A phonograph is used for advanced dictation. 

Course LXXXII. Typewriting (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

"Touch" typewriting : That is, the student does not depend on watch- 
ing a lettered keyboard, but operates the machine perfectly, because he 
has a thorough knowledge of the position of every key, thereby gaining 
speed and accuracy and lessening the strain upon himself. He is required 
to become proficient in transcribing his shorthand notes, in copying, sten- 
ciling, and must be able to take dictation from the teacher or from the 
phonograph. When competent, he has actual business practice. The presi- 
dent's office, the faculty and the different organizations of the school supply 
this department with different kinds of work. 



60 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

By an Act of the Legislature the State Normal-Industrial School is 
required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military Science 
and the company organized and drilled is subject to regular inspection by 
the Adjutant General of the State. In harmony with this provision young 
men are drilled regularly in the schools of the soldier, squad, platoon, 
company, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(i) Organization. The cadet battalion at present comprises, with 
the Commandant, one cadet Captain, one cadet First Lieutenant, one cadet 
Second Lieutenant, five Sergeants, one Color Sergeant, six Corporals and 
one Artificer and cadets. A single permanent company is maintained under 
the name of Company A. 

(2) Equipment. The State Normal-Industrial School is supplied 
with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutrements; a Winchester rifle for long 
range practice, Winder target rifles; a large Atkins disappearing target; 
United States regulation rapiers, for fencing; sabers and belts for cadet 
officers ; silk battalion flag, United States regulation ammunition, consisting 
of cartridges for target practice, and blank cartridges for use in volley firing 
and skirimish drill. 

(3) Appointments and promotions. The officers and non-com- 
missioned officers are selected from among those cadets who have been most 
studious, soldier-like and faithful in the performance of their duties and who 
have been most exemplary in their deportment. The Commandant and the 
Commissioned Officers constitute the Board of Examiners for the appoint- 
ment and promotion of privates and non-commissioned officers. 

(4) Military diploma. Commissions and warrants are issued to 
the commissioned officers who are duly examined and deemed worthy of 
promotion, provided, however, that they have drilled at least one term as 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 6 I 

officers, have been promoted to higher rank, have received an average of 
not less than 70 per cent, and have participated in at least one annual 
military contest. 

(5) Uniform. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn by all 
cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in courses requiring 
attendance for more than a single term. This uniform consists of blouse, 
trousers and cap of cadet gray color, modeled after the United State Military 
Academy uniform, and is made in two qualities costing, respectively, $10.85 
and $12.85. The uniform is tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, 
durable and economical a suit as the student can obtain for this amount. It 
may be purchased at the school, at actual cost, or elsewhere, as the student 
elects. Uniforms and gloves are worn at all regular drills and inspections. 

(6) Attendance. Six terms of military drill is required of all 
boys, unless excused on account of physical disability. A physician's cer- 
tificate must accompany such excuse. The standing of each cadet is aver- 
aged at the close of each term. The chief items considered in determining 
the grade are attendance, deportment and drill. Only those cadets whose 
average is above 70 per cent for the six terms will be exempt from attend- 
ance. 

(7) Annual military contest and prizes. An annual military 
contest is held at the close of the Winter Term. There are four events: 
Company Drill and Inspection; Officers' Saber Drill; Squad Drill; Indi- 
vidual Contest Drill. For each drill at the annual military contest there are 
three judges selected by the President and Commandant. The squad re- 
ceiving the highest percentage in contest drill is presented with a silk ribbon, 
suitably inscribed, which is attached to the battalion colors, and the members 
of the squad receive honorable mention in the catalogue. The prize for the 
best drilled man in the individual contest is a silver medal, for the second 
best drilled cadet a bronze medal, and each receives honorable mention. The 
individual contest is open to all members of the battalion. All cadets who 
take part in the annual military contest must appear in full regulation 
uniform. 

In the contest of 19 12, Lyall Willis was awarded the silver medal and 
Arthur Rosenthal the bronze medal. The first squad winner in the squad 
contest was composed of First Lieutenant Robert Earnest (commanding), 
and Cadets Arthur Rosenthal, Lyall Willis, Oliver Halstead, Charles Hal- 
stead, Cleve Malin, George Hargrave and Linville Townsend. 



62 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Course XXXIII. Military Science. 

Two periods per week for six terms ; 6 points credit. 

Theoretical and practical instruction in infantry regulations; manual 
of arms; school of the company and squad drill; bayonet exercises; saber 
drill ; guard duty ; small arm firing ; battalion parade ; reviews, etc. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

The primary purpose of the State Normal-Industrial School is the 
harmonious development of the entire boy or girl. Athletics and sports 
have a place in the development of every normal person and receive proper 
encouragement and supervision. Physical training is compulsory; two 
periods per week for six terms. Each student, before entering the gymna- 
sium, is given a physical examination. The condition of heart, lungs, 
digestion, nervous and muscular system, carriage, etc., is noted and indi- 
cated on a chart. This enables the instructor to prescribe special exercises 
for individual needs. Each student must be provided with a light gymnasium 
suit of prescribed pattern. There is a fee of fifty cents a year. 

Course LXXXIV. Physical Training. 

(a) For young men. Two periods per week for six terms ; 6 points 
credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnastics, both with 
and without apparatus; free-hand exercises; sports. Football, basketball, 
baseball and tennis are available in season. 

(b) For young women. Two periods per week for six terms; 6 
points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises are similar 
to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bell and barbell training, club swinging, 
marching, running, exercises with light apparatus, etc. Basketball is given 
a fair share of the time. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 63 



Roster of Students 

SENIOR CLASS 

Axtell, Grace, H. E. and 4-year Normal Ellendale 

Blumer, Minnie, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Blomquist, G. W., C. P Kulm 

Ball, Myrtle, Four year Normal Ferney, S. D. 

Beggs, Ruth, H. E Ellendale 

Barnes, Barbara, C. A Ellendale 

Crabtree, Lucile, C. P Ellendale 

Crabtree, Mattie, Four year Normal Merricourt 

Coleman, Lelah, C. P . Ellendale 

Case, Birdie, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Dickey, Adah, H. E Ellendale 

Dickey, May, C. P . Ellendale 

Dawe, Jessie, Four year Normal Fullerton 

Dawe, Nellie, H. E Fullerton 

Eiden, Mamie, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Earnest, Wilma, H. E Forbes 

Earnest, Robert, C. P. and Manual Training Forbes 

Flemington, Adah, H. E Ellendale 

Green, Iva, H. E Ellendale 

Hargrave, George, Manual Training Hankinson 

Hogan, Carl, Manual Training . Ellendale 

Haas, Kathryn, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Harvey, Josephine, H. E Benson, Minn. 

Kellogg, Ruth, Four year Normal Ellendale 

La Berge, Armand, Manual Training Oakland 

Laemmle, John, C. P Ashley 

Leiby, Ruth, C. P . . Ellendale 

Letson, Howard, Manual Training Ellendale 

McCulloch, Laura, C. P Edgeley 

McGraw, Hugh, Manual Training Cogswell 

McMartin, Gladys, Four year Normal Ellendale 



64 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Morgan, Josephine, Four year Normal Ellendale 

McDonald, Dan, M. A Ellendale 

McDonald, Thomas, M. A . Ellendale 

Miller, Etta, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Misfeldt, George, C. A Ellendale 

Morrison, Glenn, C. P Ellendale 

Morrison, Howard, M. A Ellendale 

Reedy, Kathryn, Four year Normal Beresford, S. D. 

Rouse, Ruth, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Shimmin, Maude, Four year Normal Forbes 

Shimmin, Ellen, Four year Normal Forbes 

Saunders, Blanche, C. P Ellendale 

Shimmin, Albert, Manual Training Manhattan, Kans. 

Thompson, Elmer, Manual Training Fairdale 

Van Meter, Grace, H. E '. Ellendale 

Wilson, Mamie, H. E Ellendale 

Williams, Estella, C. P Ellendale 

Willis, Bessie, H. E Rhame 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Applequist, Boone, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Bowler, Lucy, C. A Ellendale 

Boyd, Joseph, C. P Ellendale 

Bentley, John, M. A Ellendale 

Boyd, Viola, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Baumbach, Ida, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Bentley, Clell, M. A Ellendale 

Case, Mary, H. E Ellendale 

Dales, Frank, C. A Vernon, S. D. 

Dean, Cressy, Four year Normal La Moure 

Fleming, Tacy, Four year Normal Monango 

Haas, Ruth, H. E Ellendale 

Holte, Howard, C. A Ellendale 

Joseph, Lena, Four year Normal Ellendale 

Kosel, John, M. A Ellendale 

Kellogg, Anna, H. E . Ellendale 

Lawhead, Arthur, C. A Taylor 

Morgan, Howard, C. A Ellendale 

Malin, Cleve, M. A Kulm 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 65 

McGinnis, Lillian, H. E Silverleaf 

McPherson, Cecile, H. E Monango 

Plattner, Margaret, H. E Scotland, S. D. 

Porter, Preston, C. P Ellendale 

Payton, Bessie, H. E Oakes 

Randall, Laura, Four year normal Ludden 

Rugroden, Pauline, Four year normal Forbes 

Stahl, Charles, M. A Ellendale 

Stafsberg, Mabel, H. E Ellendale 

Stafsberg, Edna, H. E Ellendale 

Townsend, Linville, C. A Ellendale 

Upham, Maggie, H. E Grafton 

Walker, Frances, Four year normal Ellendale 

Willis, Lyall, C. A. Rhame 

Vandanacker, James, C. P Ellendale 

Zimmerman, Pearl, Four year normal Noonan 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Abraham, Francis, M. A Ellendale 

Anderson, Eva, Four year normal Fullerlon 

Anderson, Mabel, Four year normal Ellendale 

Boom, Frances, H. E. Ellendale 

Brown, Floyd, M. A Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clara, H. E Ellendale 

Baumbach, Tillie, Four year normal Ellendale 

Barnes, Bertha, C. P Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clarence, M. A Ellendale 

Campbell, Bessie, H. E Ellendale 

Crary, Charles, M. A Ellendale 

Crabtree, Ben, M. A Merricourt 

Dawson, Grace, H. E. _ Ellendale 

Dobler, Christain, C. P Kulm 

Dunton, Mauriel, M. A Ellendale 

Dean, Daisy, C. A Ellendale 

Dawe, John, C. P Fullerlon 

Evans, Ruie, Four year normal Forbes 

Earnest, Nellie, H. E Forbes 

Fleming, Stanley, M. A Ellendale 

Gish, Grace, C. A Ellendale 

Gamble, Will, C. A Monango 



66 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Grosz, Albert, C. A Kulm 

Gackle, Martin, C. A Kulm 

Guldberg, Mary, Four year normal Ellendale 

Holte, Maude, C. P Ellendale 

Hill, Hervey, M. A Ellendale 

Hadley, Edward, M. A Ellendale 

Howard, Nettie, Four year normal Ellendale 

Harvey, Dorothy, H. E Ellendale 

Hill, Myrtle, C. A Ellendale 

Howard, Nellie, Four year normal Ellendale 

Higgs, Vera, H. E „ Ellendale 

Halstad, Oliver, M. A Ellendale 

Halstad, Charles, M. A Ellendale 

Harm, Pearl, H. E Ellendale 

Knox, Bertha, H. E Monango 

Kalbus, Martha, Four year normal Ellendale 

Knox, George, M. A Monango 

Kellogg, Joycelyn, Four year normal Ellendale 

Lynde, Llewellyn, M. A Ellendale 

Lynde, Orrin, M. A „ Ellendale 

Lange, Oscar, C. P Ellendale 

Lyons, Mabel, H. E Ellendale 

Lane, Charles, M. A . Ellendale 

Lamb, Iris, H. E Marmath 

Misfeldt, Douglas, C. A Ellendale 

Meachen, Leonard, M. A Ellendale 

Melicher, Joe, C. A.__„ Kulm 

Merchant, Edith, C. P Ellendale 

McCulloch, Silas, M. A Edgely 

McCulloch, William, M. A Edgely 

McMartin, Esther, H. E Ellendale 

Nelson, Lottie, H. E Oakes 

Nichols, Harry, M. A Oakes 

Potter, Robert, C. A Ellendale 

Potter, Laura, C. P Ellendale 

Pollock, Kittie, C. P Ellendale 

Porter, Hector, M. A Ellendale 

Rosenthal, Arthur, C. A Ellendale 

Randall, Hazel, H. E Ellendale 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 6j 

Risbridger, Maroe, H. E Ellendaie 

Schon, Julia, C. A Ellendaie 

Steele, Mildred, H. E Berlin 

Saunders, Maurice, M. A Ellendaie 

Shepard, Irma, Four year normal Ellendaie 

Stafberg, Clara, H. E Ellendaie 

Thompson, Fred, C. A Fairdale 

Walton, Frances, C. P Ellendaie 

Wattles, Alice, C. A Ellendaie 

Weiste, Esther, H. E Ellendaie 

Wagner, Winnie, Four year normal Guelph 

Wilson, Hazel, C. A Ellendaie 

Webb, Irene, H. E Ellendaie 

Wood, Ernest, M. A Forbes 

Young, Mabel, H. E Ellendaie 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Ackerman, Fred, C. A. Wishek 

Brennan, Cornelius, Normal Minot 

Dethlefson, Julia, H. E Oakes 

Dawe, Gladys, Four year Normal Fullerton 

Dean, Minnie, R. T . Ellendaie 

Erickson, Anna, C. A Ludden 

Everson, Mabel, R. T Washburn 

Fawcett, Ethel, Four year Normal Ellendaie 

Gamble, Richard, M. A Rock Creek 

Hatfield, Jane, C. A Fullerton 

Hatfield, Edna, Normal Fullerton 

Hollan, Ida, R. T Kulm 

Harm, Jay, M. A Ellendaie 

Houlihan, Elizabeth, H. E Ellendaie 

Jeska, Edith, H. E Ellendaie 

Kunrath, Caroline, H. E Oakes 

King, Maude, C. A Ellendaie 

Lay, Adolph, C. A Kulm 

Lewis, Edward, C. A Dawson 

Lillyord, Agatha, R. T Ellendaie 

Nathan, Theodore, C. A Ellendaie 



68 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Nelson, Bertha, R. T Marion 

Podoll, Ella, R. T : Judd 

Pfeifle, Edward, C. A Wishek 

Ritmiller, Gus, C. A Ellendale 

Shimmin, Chas., M. A Forbes 

Schrader, Esther, R. T Ludden 

Strutz, Arthur, M. A Oakes 

Taylor, Bertha, R. T Ellendale 

Vennum, Ida, R. T Monango 

White, Bernice, C. A Ellenda<e 

Walker, Robert, M. A Ellendale 

SHORT COURSE STUDENTS 

Aus, Sophie, H. E Litchville 

Baldwin, Lloyd, F. E Ludden 

Brown, Mrs. Walter, H. E Ellendale 

Bennett, Robert, M. A Lidgerwood 

Bethke, Clara, H. E Edgeley 

Benson, Malinda, H. E Verona 

Boom, Josie, H. E Ellendale 

Byers, Fred, C. A Ellendale 

Chesebro, Laken, F. E Ellendale 

Dobler, Gottlieb, F. E Kulm 

Dethlefson, Dethlef, F. E ! Oakes 

Dean, Archie, F. E Ellendale 

Dethlefson, Anna, H. E Oakes 

Hanhela, Ida, H. E Straubville 

Hanhela, Hilda, H. E Straubville 

Hanson, Emil, F. E Oakes 

Harm, Roy, F. E Ellendale 

Hanson, Hilda, H. E Oakes 

Junod, Edith, H. E La Moure 

Kalbus, Carl, F. E Ellendale 

Lucre, Martha, H. E Fullerton 

Lind, Nettie, H. E Bismarck 

Melby, Lena, H. E Elbow Lake, Minn. 

McComish, Mabel, H. E Ellendale 

Nelson, Aleda, H. E Baldwin 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 69 

Noess, William, F. E Ellendale 

Noess, John, F: E Ellendale 

Nelson, Arthur. F. E Baldwin 

Nordstrom, Arthur, F. E Kulm 

Nelson, Nehm, F. E Marion 

Oliason, Carl, M. A Guelph 

Olson, Mary, H. E Litchville 

Olufson, Anna, H. E Guelph 

Peterson, Carrie, H. E Verona 

Porter, Leigh, F. E Ellendale 

Pierce, Raymond, F. E Ellendale 

Rockne, Belle, H. E . Northwood 

Roloff, Gotthielf, F. E Kulm 

Schott, John, F. E Braddock 

Schulz, Augusta, H. E Edgeley 

Sandvig, Clara, H. E Northwood 

Smith, Walter, C. A Ellendale 

Veum, John, F. E Hoople 

Veum, Hilda, H. E Hoople 

Vernon, Arthur, F. E Edgeley 

Walz, Fred, F. E Kulm 

Weist, Emil, C. A Ellendale 

Williams, Melvin, C. A Ellendale 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Beggs, Mabel, H. E Ellendale 

Blumer, Fred, C. A Ellendale 

Crabtree, Dwight, C. A Ellendale 

Dunton, Imogene, F. A Ellendale 

Eiden, Willie, C. A Ellendab 

Higgs, Archie, F. A Ellendale 

Holte, Mae, H. E Ellendale 

Johnson, Louise, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Kalbus, Julius, C. A , Aroya, Colo. 

Kinney, Edna, H. E Grand Rapids 

Lynde, Guy, M. A Ellendale 

Maffioli, Frank, M. A Ellendale 

McCulloch, Margaret, H. E Edgeley 

Puffer, Gertrude, Inst. Music , Guelph 



70 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Reiplinger, Katherine, H. E Chicago, 111. 

Rusco, Fred, M. A Ellendale 

St. Ores, Rozella, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Van Meter, Harriet, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Wirch, Henry, Inst. Music Wirch 

Williams, Beulah, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Welcher, Eber, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Welcher, Donna, Inst. Music Ellendaie 




INDEX 



Admission 13 

Agriculture 39 

Athletics 18 

Bacteriology 41 

Board and Rooms 16 

Board of Trustees 2 

Bookkeeping 58 

Buildings 11 

Calendar 7 

Chemistry 40 

Civics 36 

College Preparatory Course 31 

Commercial Arts Course 57 

Cooking 54 

Courses of Instruction 33 

Courses of Study 

1. Normal 20 

2. Industrial 2 6 

Diploma and Certificates 15 

Discipline 16 

Domestic Arts and Science 25-52 

Dormitory, Dacotah Hall 10 

Drawing and Fine Arts 54 

Dressmaking 29 

Education 41 

Elective Courses 13 

Engineering, Farm 29 

English Literature 34 

Expenses 16 

Faculty 3 

Fine Arts Course 27 

Food Analysis 41 

Forging 4 8 

General Information 9 

German 44 

Grammar 34 

High School Graduates 2 5 

History 36 

Home Economics 27 

Industrial Department 26 

Latin 4 3 

Library 17 

Life of Student 10 

Literary and Musical Societies 17 

Location and Equipment 11 

Mathematics 37 

Mechanic Arts 4 5 

Mechanic Arts Course 26 

Mechanical Drawing 54 



Military Science 60 

Music — Vocal 56 

Music — Instrumental 55 

Normal Department 20 

Pattern Making 51 

Physics 4 

Physical Training 62 

Preceptress 10 

Prizes 15 

Prospective Students 19 

Psychology 42 

Publications 19 

Relation to Other Schools 15 

Religious Environment 18 

Requirements for Graduation 13 

Roster of Students 63 

Science 38 

Special Students 17 

Stenography and Typewriting 59 

Stenographic Course 59 

Summer School 18 

Teachers of Manual Training 25 

Turnery 4 8 

Zoology 40 



Itllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllll 
North Dakota 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 

Ellendale, North Dakota 




UNIVERSITY OF ILUNOIS 
* 12 1913 

Catalog Number 

September, 1913 



^lillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllifi 



CATALOG NUMBER 



North Dakota State Normal 
and Industrial School 




't^M§> 





SEPTEMBER, 1913 
Vol. 8 No. 4 



Published Quarterly by the 
STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North Dakota 

Entered August 8, 1907, at Ellendale, North Dakota, under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 . 



"No man is sound either in vision or in judgment who holds him- 
self apart from the work of society." — Mabie. 



Board of Trustees 



Hon. Chester R. Hodge, President, Jamestown 
Hon. Richard McCarten, Cogswell 
Hon. H. H. Perry, Ellendale 
Hon. F. S. Goddard, Ellendale 
Hon. D. E. Geer, Ellendale 



Faculty 



Willis E. Johnson. State Normal School, St. Cloud, Minnesota; 
Student, Carleton College; Ph.B., and M.A., Illinois Wesleyan 
University; Postgraduate student, University of Chicago; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 19 13. 

President. 

A. E. Dunphy. Eau Claire, Wis., School of Mechanic Arts; Special 
Student Wisconsin University, 1907; Teacher of Mechanic Arts, 
Eau Claire, 1895-8; Waukesha Industrial School, 1898-9; State 
Normal-Industrial School, 1899. Acting President, 1911-12. 
Director of Mechanic Arts 

E. W. Ackert. Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899; 
B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901 ; A. B., Drake University, 1907; 
Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State Normal-Industrial School, 
1907. 

Mathematics 

W. G. Bowers. West Virginia State Normal, 1897 J A. B., Ohio Wes- 
leyan University, 1905; A. M., Indiana State University, 1910; 
Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1903- 
5; Principal of Schools, Leesburg, O., 1905-6; Instructor in 
Science, Indiana Normal, 1906-7 ; State Normal-Industrial School, 
1907. 

Physical Science 

Carrie Tuttle. A. B., Wittenberg College, 1896; Student in Library 
Economy, Chicago University, 1904-6. State Normal-Industrial 
School, 1907. 

Librarian 

Gabriella C. Brendemuhl. A. B., Carleton College, 1905 ; Teach- 
er of German and Preceptress, Rochester Academy, 1905-08; High 
School Principal, 1908-10; State Normal-Industrial School, 1910. 

German 



Rose W. Eaton.. B. L. University of Minnesota; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Instructor Minnesota High Schools, ten years; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 191 1. 

Latin 

Jacob Schutz. Graduate Royal Conservatory of Christiania, Norway, 
piano and voice; A. B., University of Christiania, 1897; Ph. B. 
University of Christiania, 1900; Director of Music, Grand River 
College, Gallatin, Mo., 1906-09; Director of Music, Tuscaloosa 
Conservatory of Music, Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1909-11. State Normal 
and Industrial School, 191 1. 

Piano 

Voice 

Floyd C. Hathaway. B. S., South Dakota State College of Agricul- 
ture and Mechanic Arts; student Parker College; student Min- 
nesota School of Agriculture; graduate student University of Wis- 
consin; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Agriculture 

Grace S. Kane. Diploma Jefferson, Iowa, High School, 1897; State 
Teachers' College, Cedar Falls, Iowa; Principal First Class Iowa 
High Schools, 1903-1910; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1910. 

Preparatory Department 
Penmanship 

Alice Madeline Gunn. B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 
1 90 1 ; post-graduate work, 1902-3; Director of Domestic Science 
Department and Home Economics Department, Iron Mt. Michi- 
gan, 1903-06; Illinois Woman's College, Jacksonville, 111., 1906- 
08 ; Director of Domestic Science and Art, State Normal School, 
Superior, Wis., 1908-12. State Normal and Industrial School, 

1913. 

Director of Home Economics Dept. 

Ida Leone Brooks. A. B., University of Minnesota; undergraduate 
student, University of Southern California; post-graduate student, 
Simmons College, Boston ; President Students' Government Asso- 
ciation. University of Minnesota Dormitory. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 191 3. 

Preceptress 

Domestic Science 

Girls* Physical Training 



Mabel Burke. Clinton, Iowa, Public School ; St. Joseph's Academy, 
St. Paul, State Normal and Industrial School, 1910; Snow Col- 
lege, Rockford, 111. ; Instructor North Dakota High School ; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 191 1. 
Domestic Art 

W. C. Hutton. Graduate Lewis Institute; Instructor in Manual 
Training, Lake Geneva, Wis., High School, 1908-12. State Nor- 
mal and Industrial School, 191 2. 

Woodwork 
Cabinet Making 

R. S. King. M. E., Ohio State University; M. S., University of Min- 
nesota. State Normal and Industrial School, 19 12. 
Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 

Joseph Ellsworth Swetland. A. B., Ripon College. All Wisconsin 
fullback (football) four seasons; All Wisconsin guard (basketball). 
Holds college records in hurdles, shot, discus and hammer ; Instruc- 
tor and coach Grand Rapids and Eau Claire High School, 1910- 
12; State Normal and Industrial School, 1912. 
Athletic Director 
Military Science 

Beatrice Olson. B. A., University of North Dakota. Emerson Col- 
lege of Oratory, Boston. Principal of High School, Rugby, N. D., 
Instructor English and Public Speaking, Fargo, N. D. State Nor- 
mal and Industrial School, 191 3. 

Head of English Department 
Public Speaking 

Olin E. Combellick. Graduate of Normal Department, Dakota 
University; B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University; Superintendent 
of Schools, 1907-1913; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Director of Normal Department 

Ida N. Chambers. Graduate of Frances Shimer School of University 
of Chicago, Mr. Carroll; graduate of Art Institute, Chicago; 
Supervisor of Drawing, St. Cloud, Minnesota, 1911-1913; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 191 3. 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 



R. F. Palmer. A. B., Harvard College; Graduate of Metropolitan 
Business College; commercial instructor in high schools and col- 
leges, 1907-1911; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Director Commercial Department 

Jacob Gruenig. Graduate of Bryant and Stratton's Business Col- 
lege; student Southern Illinois Normal University; State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1913. 

History 

Mamie Wilson. Graduate in Home Economics, State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1912. 

Assistant in Domestic Art 

Frances Walker. Student, State Normal and Industrial School. 
Assistant in Music Department. 

Arthur Lawhead. Student State Normal and Industrial School. 
Assistant In Commercial Department. 

Mrs. Ella Duncan 
Matron 

Carrie M. Steele 
Secretary and Registrar 



Calendar 



Fall Term, 



1913 

Thirteen Weeks 



Registration, Monday, September 22, and Tuesday, September 23 

Class Work Begins, Wednesday, September 24 

Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., and Faculty Reception, 

Saturday Evening, September 27 
Thanksgiving Recess Begins, Wednesday Evening, November 26 

Class Work Resumes, Tuesday, December 2 

Fall Term Ends, Friday Evening, December 19 

1914 

Winter Term, Eleven Weeks 



Registration, 

Class Work Begins, 

Annual Military Contest, 

Company A Reception and Banquet, 

Winter Term Ends, 



Monday, January 5 

Tuesday, January 6 

Friday, March 20 

Saturday, March 21 

Friday Evening, March 20 



Spring Term, Twelve Weeks. 

Registration, 

Class Work Begins, 

Field Day, Schools, 

Memorial Day, Holiday, 

Baccalaureate Address, 

Annual Oratorical and Declamatory Contest, 

Annual School Concert, 

Field Day, N-L, 1 P. M., 

Junior-Senior Reception, 

Commencement, 10:30 A. M., 

President's Reception, 

Alumni Reception, 



Monday, March 23 

Tuesday, March 24 

Friday, May 15 

Saturday, May 30 

Sunday, June 7 

Monday, June 8 

Tuesday, June 9 

Wednesday, June 10 

Wednesday, June 10 

Thursday, June 11 

Thursday, June 11 

Friday, June 12 



Summer Term, Six Weeks. 



Registration, 
Work Begins, 
Summer Term Ends, 



Monday, June 15 

Tuesday, June 16 

Friday Evening, July 24 



General Information 



Purpose and Scope of the School: 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was es- 
tablished by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with a section of 
the state constitution providing for its creation. The revised law of 1907 
relating to this school reads as follows: 

Name and Object: 

"That the Institution located at Ellendale, Dickey County, North 
Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial School, the object 
of such school being to provide instruction in a comprehenseive way in 
wood and iron work and the various other branches of domestic economy 
as a coordinate branch of education, together with mathematics, drawing 
and the other school studies and to prepare teachers in the science of 
education and the art of teaching in the public schools with special 
reference to manual training." 

• It is believed that with this broad but well defined mission the Nor- 
mal and Industrial School offers superior advantages to the young people 
of the state. Educational thought of the day is constantly emphasizing 
more and more the practical and everyday duties and problems of life 
along with the processes of formal culture. This school is well located 
and abundantly equipped to give this many sided and full preparation 
for the complete life. 

THE SCHOOL 

A cordial invitation to visit the Normal-Industrial School is ex- 
tended to all persons who may be interested in school work, and espe- 
cially to those engaged in educational work. The school will welcome 
inquiries concerning teachers trained in its different departments. There 
is a demand for such teachers and public school officials will find that 
it is the purpose of the administration of the school to place its grad- 
uates so that they will serve the state with credit to themselves and the 
interests involved. 

Life of the Student: 

Dacotah Hall, remodelled, situated on the school campus, close to 
the other buildings, is an unusually attractive home for young women. 



io Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

The reception halls and society rooms are unusually pleasing. Here the 
young women of the school are surrounded by a stimulating and Chris- 
tian influence. The purpose of the administration of the hall is to make 
it, not a boarding house, but a Christian home, where every effort may 
be put forth to maintain the amenities of life, which prevail in homes 
of influence, refinement and good cheer. It is believed that the social 
life which the hall offers is one of the most valuable parts of the stu- 
dent's education while here. The building is arranged to accommodate 
nearly one hundred students, and is modern thruout, having a complete 
equipment of bathrooms, toilet rooms, steam heat, electric light and 
laundry. All the rooms are well lighted and well arranged. Bedding 
must be furnished by the students themselves. Each young lady intend- 
ing to reside at the hall should bring at least three sheets, three pillow 
cases, blankets, towels, soap and napkins. Preference in choice of rooms 
is given in order of application. The health and comfort of the students 
are the first consideration and all matter relating to food, hygiene and 
sanitation are carefully observed. 

Living expenses, including board, room, light, heat and use of 
laundry and bath rooms, are $14.00 per month of four weeks. Table 
board is $3.00 per week. This rate is exceedingly low, when one con- 
siders the completeness of the service offered. The school does not aim 
to pay all the cost of operating the hall from these receipts. The table 
board is excellent and the building is finely equipped. Single meals 
and meals to guests are 20c each. Bills are payable one month in ad- 
vance. No discount is made for absences of less than a week except in 
the case of the regular vacations, as indicated in the calendar. Students 
are required to take care of their own rooms. Mail is taken to the post- 
office and delivered twice a day. 

Work of the Preceptress: 

It is the belief of the administration that the dormitory should form 
the center of school life and its influence should spread throughout 
school circles, creating a sentiment for that which is ennobling in the 
lives of young women. 

To stimulate this influence and to further the spirit of unity in 
school activities, the preceptress has, as much as possible, the same per- 
sonal interest in the students residing outside of the dormitory as those 
within. Thus the health, the profitable use of time and energy, the 
social welfare of the women are all matters which concern her in an 
intimate way. 

With a view to a closer association of school and home interests the 
preceptress entertains the young women of the school in groups. These 
occasions are of an informal nature and aim to afford an opportunity for 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog ii 

social grace, initiative along lines of entertainment, and especially to fos- 
ter a feeling of good fellowship throughout the student body of young 
women. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The plant of the State Normal-Industrial School consists of five 
main buildings and a power plant and engine laboratory. 

I. Carnegie Hall. 

This is a four story pressed brick structure, beautiful and com- 
modious. In it are found the Normal Departments, Departments of 
Science, English, Mathematics, Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumen- 
tal Music and the Library. In each department the equipment is such 
that students may reap the most generous returns from their efforts. 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Physiography are taught in laboratories 
in the most approved manner ; the Department of English has access 
to abundant literature, the Commercial Department is provided with 
typewriters, duplicators, Edison dictation phonograph records, etc. ; the 
Department of Music owns eight high grade pianos and supplements 
these with rented instruments ; the Department of Fine Arts is equipped 
with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, lockers, kiln 
for burning china, etc. ; the library is generously provided with fiction, 
history, biography, scientific works, reference texts, etc., is equipped 
with a cabinet finding list and Poole's Index, and is gradually accumu- 
lating bound volumes of the standard magazines. 

II. Home Economics Building. 

A three-story red brick building houses the Department of Domestic 
Science and Art. The department occupies the entire upper floor, and 
the lower floor in part, and is equipped with sewing machines, charts, 
lockers, tables, desks, cooking utensils, ranges, individual gas stoves and 
ovens. It also has the necessary demonstration table, dishes, silverware, 
linen, glassware, etc., for a dining room. 

III. Mechanic Arts Building. 

This is a two-story red brick structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. 
The Departments of Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery 
occupy the upper floor and are equipped with drafting benches, lathes, 
benches, individual and special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, tenoning 
machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the Depart- 
ment of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is equipped with 
engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, hack saw, grinder, etc. 
The department of steam and gas engines is equipped with a thirty-five- 



12 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

horse-power Ideal engine, a twenty-horse-power horizontal side crank 
Howell engine, a twenty-horse-power automatic gasoline engine, a Case 
traction engine, a Gaar-Scott dismounted traction engine, an Interna- 
tional portable gas engine, a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine, 
a Gray Marine Motor, a six-horse-power Freeport gasoline engine, cal- 
orimeters, Crosby steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction 
brake, water meter, injector, pumps, traps, boiler attachments, etc. 

V. Armory. 

This is a two-story red brick building. The first floor is occupied 
by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft forges, an- 
vils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor constitutes the gymnasium 
and armory proper, and is equipped with dumb bells, Indian clubs, hor- 
izontal bars, traveling rings, spring board, vaulting horse, mats and the 
usual apparatus for physical training; and with shower baths and 
lockers. 

VI. Demonstration Farm. 

Thirty acres, adjacent to the buildings, has been reserved for a 
demonstration farm. One section has been fenced for cultivation. 
Each of the demonstration strips averages one-tenth of an acre in area 
and has been carefully cultivated and valuable results have been ob- 
tained. 

VII. Athletic Field. 

The N-I Athletic Field is 288 ft. wide by 336 ft. long, enclosed, 
and in it are found the base-ball diamond, foot-ball field, out-door basket- 
ball field, rifle range and grand stand. Here are held the out-of-door 
meets and the target practice of Company A. 

ADMISSION 

( 1 ) Any young man or young woman of good moral character 
who has completed the common school course and received a diploma 
will be admitted without examination. A preparatory course is main- 
tained for those students coming from schools not offering eighth grade 
work. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be ad- 
mitted upon their credentials. 

(3) Applicants not vouched for by the classification committee 
will be required to pass an examination. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 13 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial depart- 
ments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice of parents and 
teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. This choice having been 
once made, no pupil will be permitted to change his course or to drop 
a subject except for the most important considerations and then only 
upon recommendation of the instructor and consent of the president. 
The average work is five studies recited five times a week. The "unit" 
of credit is a term's satisfactory work in a single subject, three units of 
credit being given for a year's work in a single subject. No credit is 
given in academic subjects for less than a full term's work or until the 
completion of the subject. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

(1) From the Normal Department. 

(a) To be entitled to graduation from the Four- Year Course the 
student must have earned 66 units credit, 54 of which are constants for 
all schedules, 12 being elective from the arts and 6 from academic sub- 
received credit for two years of military drill. 

(b) To be entitled to graduation from the Five- Year Course the 
student must have earned 82.5 units credit, 64.5 of which are constants 
for all course, 12 being electives. The military requirement is the same 
as above. 

The complete requirement for graduation from the normal courses 
is as follows: 



Four- Year Course 






Five- Year Course 


9 


units 


English 




9 


units 


6 


tt 


History 




9 


<< 


10.5 


u 


Mathematics 




10.5 


«< 


12 


a 


Science 




15 


(< 


7-5 


<< 


Education 




10.5 


<< 


3 


" 


Music 




3 


<( 


3 


<< 


Drawing 




3 


(< 


3 


" 


Reviews and 


Meth. 


4-5 


(< 


6 


(< 


Physical Training 


6 


a 


6 


<( 


Electives 
___Total ___. 




12 


« 


66 


units 


82.5 


units 



(2) From the Industrial Department. 

(a) From all industrial courses. To be entitled to gradua- 
tion the student must have earned 66 units credit, 45 being constant for 



14 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

all schedules, 12 being elective from the arts and 6 from academic sub- 
jects. All young men must, in addition, have received credit for two 
years' military drill. The full requirement for graduation from art 
courses is as follows: 



English 


12 


units 


History 


12 


a 


Mathematics 


12 


a 


Science 


12 


it 


Arts — Elective 


12 


ti 


Electives 


6 


a 


Physical Training 


6 


a 



Total 66 units 

(b) From the college preparatory course. To be entitled 
to graduation the student must have earned 66 units credit including 
credits in physical training. See schedule page 27. 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

An eighth grade graduate may earn an elementary second grade 
certificate in one year and one summer session. 

The holder of a good second grade certificate may earn a first 
grade certificate (elementary) in one year or in two summer sessions. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in one year's work bej^ond a four-year high 
school course, is accredited as a second grade professional state certifi- 
cate for two years, and after nine months' successful experience in 
teaching, the holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade pro- 
fessional certificate valid for five years and renewable in the discretion 
of the State Board of Education which provides the foregoing regulations. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a four-year high 
school course, is accredited as a second grade professional certificate for 
two years, and after nine months' successful experience in teaching, the 
holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade professional certifi- 
cate valid for life. 

Graduates from either the Mechanic Arts Course, Home 
Economics Course or Fine Arts Course are entitled to a State Life 
Certificate which entitles the holder to teach that special art in the 
schools of the state. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 15 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this school 
are admitted to the following institutions with the standing indicated : 

( 1 ) State university of north Dakota. The State Univer- 
sity of North Dakota admits graduates upon their credentials allowing 
full credit for courses completed. 

(2) North Dakota agricultural college. The North Da- 
kota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore year of its Agri- 
cultural and General Science Courses all graduates of this school. 

(3) Armour institute of technology. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trigonometry 
are admitted to Armour Institute without examination and receive three 
years' credit in shop work. 

(4) Michigan college of mines. Graduates of the Mechanic 
Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping are admitted without examination. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are open 
for competition to all students: 

( 1 ) Prize in Oratory. The First National Bank of Ellendale 
offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in oratory 
under such rules as a committee of the faculty may prescribe. Won, 
in 191 3, by Lyall Willis. A second prize of $5.00 in gold is given by 
L. S. Jones & Co. Won, in 1913, by Belle Morey. 

(2) Military Prize. (First.) The State Normal and Indus- 
trial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins first place in 
individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, in 1913, by Silas 
McCulloch. 

(3) Military Prize. (Second.) A bronze medal offered by 
the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet winning second 
honors in the individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, in 
1913, by Muriel Dunton. 

(4) Declamatory Prize. The Board of Trustees offers a 
gold medal to the student who obtains first place in declamation under 
such rules as the faculty may prescribe. Won, in 1913, by Emma Hol- 
lan. A second prize of $5.00 in gold is given by N. T. Holte. Won, 
in 191 3, by Hazel Randall. 

(5) Original Story Prize. This prize, given by the Welcher 
Hardware Co., is a gold medal and is awarded to the student who pre- 
pares the best original short story. Won, in 19 13, by Don McCormick. 



1 6 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

A second prize of $5.00 in gold is given by B. Rosenthal. Won, in 
I 9 I 3> by Beatrice Keagle. Honorable Mention, won, in 191 3, by 
Everett Thrams. 

(6) Essay Prize. A prize of $10.00 is given by B. Rosenthal 
to the young man who writes the best essay on "Business Honesty." 

DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly conduct, 
and prompt obedience to lawful authority are imperative. Fortunate is 
the school in which the sentiment of the student body commends manly 
conduct. This is the type of discipline most desired at this school. In 
no sense is the State Normal-Industrial School a reform school and 
students who fail to yield a full and cheerful compliance to all require- 
ments ncessary for successful work and the honor of the school will 
be promptly dismissed. Discipline is educative when reasonable and 
intelligible. This is the guiding thought with which all discipline is 
administered. 

EXPENSES 

The state of North Dakota makes a generous provision for the 
training of her young people at this School. No tuition fees are 
charged excepting as follows: A registration fee of fifty cents is col- 
lected of each student each term. A shop fee of one dollar for each 
year's work in the shops or fifty cents for a single term. A similar 
fee of one dollar for each year's work in the department of domestic 
science and arts, or fifty cents for a single term. Special fees for priv- 
ate lessons in music are $9.00 for a term of twelve lessons. Piano rent 
is $1.00 per month. Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $3.50 per 
week payable, by the month, in advance. Good room and board may 
be had in private families at prices ranging from $4.00 per week up- 
wards. Many students rent rooms and board themselves. Board and 
room rent, the chief items of expense, range from $120 to $150 per 
year of 36 weeks. 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has been 
set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is open to all 
students until 4:30 o'clock school days. Arrangements are made by 
which students can draw books for use at times when the library is 
closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and cata 
logued ; a cabinet card catalogue ; bound volumes of the leading maga- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 17 

zines; Poole's index; congressional records, government reports and 
much other valuable material. New additions are constantly being 
made. Each department of the school has a well selected line of books 
for reference work. The leading magazines and newspapers are at 
the disposal of students. A trained librarian is in charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program, may, upon 
recommendation of the classification committee, arrange for special 
work. All such students, however, must satisfy the committee that 
their preparation is sufficient to bring them properly within the en- 
trance requirements. No student deemed deficient in the fundamentals 
will be permitted to elect the arts exclusively, but a fair balance will 
be maintained between so-called intellectual and manual training sub- 
jects. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are two literary societies, one for young women and another 
for young men. The Alphian is the organization of the young women, 
and the Sigma Pi Iota that of the young men. These societies hold 
their meetings each Saturday afternoon. All students are required to 
take such part as the program committee may designate. 

Two glee clubs, the "Schubert" (girls) and the "Orpheus" (boys) 
and an orchestra, "N-I Symphony Orchestra," are maintained. The 
course in music in public schools has been considerably enlarged and 
made more interesting and valuable to the student in reference to gen- 
eral education. Four recitals have been given during the year and one 
operetta, "Sylvia." 

Young Women's Christian Association. 

A voluntary organization which aims to promote Christian life 
among the young women of the school. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

A branch of the Young Men's Christian Association flourishes 
under the management of the students. 

Athletics. 

Foot-ball, basket-ball, baseball and track athletics are organized 
and games are played under supervision of the faculty. A regular 



1 8 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

athletic director is employed, who has charge of all athletic activities. 
The coach and captains of the teams for 1913-14 are: 

J. E. Swetland Athletic Director 

Joseph Boyd Captain of Foot-ball Team 

Emmet McGraw Captain of Basket-ball Team 

Joseph Carpenter Captain of Base-ball Team 

Lecture Course. 

A strong lecture and musical course is maintained each school year 
and has become one of the school's most popular interests. 

Religious Environment. 

The church organizations of Ellendale take a deep interest in the 
students, many of whom are identified with the various Sunday 
schools and Christian societies. Students are urged to become regular 
attendants at the church of their choice. The prohibition law is usually 
strictly enforced in this city. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Cooperating with the County Superintendent of Dickey County 
the State Normal-Industrial School conducts a Summer Training School 
each year beginning in June. A strong faculty is retained for this ses- 
sion and tuition is free. Courses are offered in all Second and First 
Grade subjects and in Domestic Science, Domestic Arts, Agriculture 
and Manual Training. Examinations are held at the close of the term 
and final grades become available for country certificates. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Normal Industrial School Bulletin is a quarterly publication 
devoted to the interests of the school and is mailed to prospective stu- 
dents upon request. The April, 1908, number (Vol. 3, No. 2), was 
devoted to a discussion of Manual Training in Secondary Courses. It 
contains an address on Manual Training, an illustrated description of 
a Manual Training High School, recommendations, estimate of the cost 
of introducing Manual Training into high school courses, suggestive 
curricula, a brief bibliography of books on Manual Training, etc., etc. 
It is mailed gratis to superintendents who are interested. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Plan to make but one visit home — at Christmas. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 19 

Bring with you such text books as may be of use to you. 

Write the president a few days before leaving home in order that 
you may be met at the station. 

Enter upon the school year with the determination to make it the 
best year of your life. 



20 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



Normal Department 

ONE of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public 
school conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other require- 
ment relating to education is of such pressing importance. The Act 
which defines the mission of the State Normal-Industrial School re- 
quires it to train teachers "in the science of education and the art of 
teaching in the public schools with special reference to manual training." 
In harmony with the spirit of this mandate the standard normal course 
has been so planned as to afford thorough and systematic training of a 
three- fold character: 

( i ) Academic : The academic courses imply a comprehensive 
literary and scientific training. Thorough and accurate scholarship is 
the teacher's most fundamental equipment. 

(2) Industrial: Courses in which the student's powers of ex- 
pression are trained jointly with his receptive faculties. 

(3) Professional: Scholarship alone is not sufficient. All 
right teaching is based upon certain well-defined principles of individual 
and social development, and upon a clear comprehension of the theories 
which underlie practice. Opportunity is afforded for applying the 
principles in practice and for studying the results under sympathetic 
and competent supervision. 

NORMAL COURSES 

The State Normal-Industrial School offers three normal courses 
and the student is permitted to elect the one he will pursue. These 
courses are as follows: 

( 1 ) An Elementary Course for Rural Teachers. 

(2) A Four- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates. 

(3) A Five- Year Course for Eighth Grade Graduates. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



21 



si 

O 

u 

«< 

o 

z 

a: 

OS 

o 

to 





ro 


l-H l-H 


ro 


CO 


ro 


> 






-d 






HH 


s 


s . 


o 


03 






bfl 


Cfi 


"on 
>> 


cu 




c 


CU -£> 




-C 




W 


o o 


s 


Ph 


3 




CO 


ro 


ro 




ro 


HH 




B 




4-> 




t-H 




o 

CU 










^ 


a 


O 


^ ~o 


«j 






CU 


4=! 


• — 


'^ 




ti) 


G 

C3 


a 

>> 


C/3 
> >> 


u 

cu 




a 




Cfl 


<U -C 






w 


E 


Ph 


P^ Ph 


3 




ro 


CO 


ro 


CO 


ro 




a. 












S 












O 










1— 1 


U 




09 








<3 




£ 




^u 




cu 


<U 

< 


cu 

O 






<N IH 


0* M 


M M 


m 


M 






CJ 




cu 


>» 




mmar 
iing 


hmeti 
wing 


2 u 


3 

4-1 


graph 
ing 




pi rt 


.t; es 


.2 "> 


*c 


o £ 




t «■> 


»- Jt 


M 


V. 03 




O PU 


< Q 


W u 


< 


°o 


* 


s 


CO 


ro 


v"4 \<N 


ro 


>> 


s 


u 




.9* 




U 


S3 






15 




o 


U 


4-1 




C/i 






o 


CU 

B 






CUD 


RJ 




.jC 


JO 


£ w 


*S 


a. 


ti 


4-1 


'> 


C "5j 


c3 


u 


G 


*c 


u ex 


cu 


Pm 


W 


< 


u 


Ph C/j 


Ph 



u 
bfl 

bfi 



C 

CD 
CU 

X 

o 



32 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



W 

CO 

Pi 

U) 

o 
u 

o 

z 



H 

J 
<J 
P 

Z 

S 

o 
z 





co 




co 




> 


> 






E « 








M-i 
O 


V 

.£ 


O «i 


H3 H 


13 




«3 


■4-> 


> § 


1 sl 


c 
cs 




s 


3 


p4 pq 


< Ph 


S 




ro 




CO 


CO 


CO 

> 


> 




• bb 


a 








H- 1 


V 


o 

"3 

-£5 




*c3 




bJD 


° £ 


CJ 
Ph 


"5i 


e 
3 




C 


c/5 <J 


£ 


§ 




ro 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1— ( 




B 






Uh' 


1— 1 


. 


o 

a 


«J 




h 




t-H 




# > 


</} 


is 




bb 
c 
W 


c 

P3 

s 


(J 

W 


s 

U 


c 




co 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 




d 








HH 




o 








In 


K 







(A 




H 




«3 

Ph 


Ih 

U 

bX 
< 


s 

c 

o 


bJD 
O 

pq 


15 

c 




C* »-• 


C* HH 


<S IN 


<S HH 


co 


- 


8 M 


metic 
lanship 


£ * 


raphy 
ology 


h 

*c3 

3 




5 "3 


.t! c 


2 .a 


rl 


C 

3 






< PL. 


ffi u 


6£ 


S 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



23 



eft 

o 
u 

en 

U 

I— i 

S 

o 
z 
o 
(J 

a 

S 
o 

as 
j 

si 
O 

z 





co 




CO 




co 


> 


1— H 




no 

W 


-£S 






HH 




o 


u <# 


DO 
C 




DC 




4-3 
«/3 


> 00 


'1 




c 






H3 -C5 




W 




£ 


< o 




« w 




CO 


co 


CO 




_C 












4-) 










> 


^ 00 DC 

w -2 


<3 


12 




►-H 

>— 1 
DC 




•o A o 


o w 


"o 


in 


# c 








J3 
O 


*5o 
>> 


U2 
o 




P4 WpH 


cc cc i^s 


WD 

Ph 


Ph 


o 
U 




CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


(S IH 


t-H 




E 












o 




>, 


1—1 




>-H 


a 






c is 




DC 


c 


o 


'e 


3 J8 

o -3 




C 


CC 


<L> 


JQ 


O rt 




W 


s 


s 


u 


U PQ 




CO 


co 


co 


co 


co 




4J 












V 












J2 












Ph" 










1— 1 














<% 




4-> 
«5 




►— i 






C3 


s 


DC 

H 


DO 




d 


ja 




C 




e 

o 




a; 
DC 

< 


c 
u 

a 


CC 




<s ~ 


<S i-i 


<S IH 


<S M 


co 






o 




>> 






2 do 


'5 M 

6 •£ 






2 

3 




S -3 


•£ * 


S B 


DC £ 


.y 




f3 rt 


•t2 C8 


.2 *> 


O CTJ 


*c 




U 5J 


>-< >- 


<u J-. 


DC 




O * 


< Q 


ffi U 


Q 


< 



24 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



Elementary Course for Rural Teachers. {10y 2 months) 
Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term Summer Term 



Grammar 


Grammar 


Grammar 




History 


History 


History 


Physiology and 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Hygiene 
Spelling 


Geography 


Geography 


Civics 


Penmanship 


Manual Training 


Drawing 


Domestic Art 


Reviews 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Pedagogy 





Physical Training throughout the school year. 

Students, to enter upon the above course, must be at least 17 years 
of age and must either have completed the common school course of 
study or have been granted a certificate to teach in North Dakota. 
Those who complete the course will receive a second grade certificate. 



FOUR YEAR COURSES 

The electives offered make possible th efollowing four-year sched- 



ules. 

(1) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course. 

(4) Latin course. 

Physical training and rhetoricals throughout the course. 
Required for graduation, 60 units, 6 of which are electives. 

1. English. 

The study of language is continued throughout three years. 

(a) Grammar. The principles of English grammar, Course I. 

(b) Literature i. Composition, Rhetoric and the study of Mas- 
terpieces, Course II. 

(c) Literature ii. The critical study of the masters and a defi- 
nite amount of reading. Course III. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 25 

2. History and Civics. 

(a) American history. An academic study and review design- 
ed to familiarize students with the sequence of American History. 
Course VI. 

(b) Civics. Colonial, Revolutionary and Federal Government. 
Course VII. 

(c) Ancient history. The essentials of history from the earl- 
iest civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the establishment of the 
western empire by Charles the Great. Course VIII. 

(d) Modern history. Mediaeval and Modern European His- 
tory down to the present day. Course IX. 

3. Mathematics. 

(a) Algebra. Elementary Algebra to quadratic equations. Course 
XII. 

(b) Plane geomftry. Inductive and deductive year course. 
Course XIII. 

(c) Solid geometry. Solid geometry. Course XIV. 

4. Science 

(a) Geography. A comprehensive and critical study of descrip- 
tive geography. Course XVII. 

(b) Physical geography. Physical ages of the earth; under- 
lying causes; effect upon mankind, etc. Course XVIII. 

(c) Agriculture. Soils, crops, animal husbandry. Course XXI. 

(d) Zoology. Lectures, rceitations and laboratory work. Course 
XXIV. 

(e) Botany. Study of types, their life history, relation to sur- 
roundings, etc. Course XXV. 

(/) Physiology. A comprehensive study of the fundamental 
principles of the science required of Home Economics students. Course 
XXVI. 

(g) Physics. A full and comprehensive treatment of the subject 
by means of lectures, recitations and laboratory work. Course XXVII. 

5. Education. 

(a) Psychology. The processes by which knowledge is acquired 
and elaborated. Course XXXV. 



26 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

(b) History of education. The educational systems of ancient 
and modern people together with a study of the lives and practices of 
the educational reformers. Course XXXVI. 

(c) Philosophy of Education. The nature and meaning of 
education and the being to be educated. Course XXXVII. 

(d) Reviews and Methods. Senior reviews and approved meth- 
ods. Course XXXIX. 

(e) Observation and Practice. Actual experience under con- 
ditions similar to those the student must meet after graduation. Course 
XLL 

6. Vocal Music. 

(a) Tune, time, technique, etc. The principles of music as ap- 
plied in instruction in the grades of the w public schools. Musical appre- 
ciation. Course LXXX. 

7. Drawing. 

(a) Taught, not as an end, but as a means; a mode of expression. 
Course LXXII. 

8. Electives. 

Six units, two year subjects, as follows: 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LXI to LXX. # 

(b) Manual Training. Courses L to LX. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XLIII to XLVI. 

(e) German. Courses XLVII to XLIX. 

FIVE YEAR COURSES 

The electives offered make possible the following schedules: 
(i) Domestic science course. 

(2) Manual training course. 

(3) English course, 
(d) Latin course. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 27 

i n in iv v 



Grammar 3 


Composition 
& Rhetoric 3 


Literature 3 


Rev. and 
Meth. iy 2 


Rev. and 
Methods 3 


History 2 
Civics 1 


Gen. Hist. 3 




Modern 
History 3 


Sociology i]/* 


Arithmetic 3 


Algebra 3 


Geom. 1 y 2 


Geometry 3 




Geography 3 


Agriculture 3 


Biology 3 


Physics 3 


Chemistry 3 


Music 3 




Psychol. 3 


Hist, and 
Phil.of Ed. 3 


Observation 
& Prac. iy 2 


Drawing 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 



Physical Training and Rhetoricals throughout the course. 

In the Five-year courses the English, History, Mathematics, 
Science and Education schedules are identical with those of the four- 
year courses with the following exceptions: 

I. Chemistry. 

The laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles developed 
in the recitation and laboratory. Courses XXIX to XXXI. 

n. Sociology. 

Principles of Sociology. A systematic study of the principles un- 
derlying the structure of society. Course XLII. 

HI. Reviews and Methods. 

Senior Reviews and emphasis upon methods of presentation. Course 
XL. 

IV. Electives. 

Twelve units, four-year courses, as follows: 

(a) Domestic science and art. Courses LXI to LXX. 

(b) Manual training. Courses L to LX. 

(c) English. Courses IV, V. 

(d) Latin. Courses XLIII to LVI. 

(0 German. Courses XLVII to XLIX. 



28 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 

Graduates of first class high schools or those who have completed 
equivalent courses will be graduated from the Four- Year Course or 
the Five- Year Course after one or two years' work respectively. Such 
persons will be required to complete courses in Psychology, History 
and Philosophy of Education, Practice, Methods and Reviews and suf- 
ficient electives to total 15 or 30 units according to the course. 

TEACHERS OF MANUAL TRAINING, DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

AND ART 

The Five-Year Course in Manual Training and Domestic Science 
and Art is especially designed to prepare teachers in these special sub- 
jects for positions in First Class High Schools, Normal Schools, Acad- 
emies, etc. The faculty offers every proper aid to graduates to secure 
positions. 

"Blessed is the man who has found his work; let him ask no other 
Blessing'' 

"The working races have been the victorious races; the non-working 
races have been the subject races." — Mabie. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

One purpose of the State of North Dakota in establishing the 
STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL was to provide 
an institution in which young men and young women might receive such 
special instruction and training as would prepare them to earn their 
own living and take their places as useful and self-supporting mem- 
bers of society. The state requires that the school shall instill into the 
minds of young men and young women a true appreciation of the value, 
desirability and dignity of skilled labor; that it shall prepare them for 
immediate and well-directed action in the practical affairs of life — that 
they shall be trained TO DO as well as TO THINK. In harmony 
with this thought, the State Normal and Industrial School offers such 
industrial courses as shall prepare students for higher living and more 
efficient service in the HOME, the SHOP, the FIELD and the 
OFFICE. 

INDUSTRIAL COURSES 

The following industrial courses are offered. In each of these 
courses thorough and systematic instruction is prescribed in English, 
Mathematics, History and Science. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 29 

I. Mechanic Arts Course. 

This course is designed to afford a thorough training in Mechanical 
Drawing and in the use and application of tools; to prepare young men 
to enter upon higher technical courses; to train all 'round mechanics. 

( 1 ) Joinery and turnery. Care and use of common tools and 
the mastery of the lathe. Course LII. 

(2) Forging. Drawing out, bending, welding, making of useful 
articles. Course LII. 

(3) Pattern making and molding. The making of patterns; 
foundry practice. Course LII. 

(4) Chipping and filing. For the purpose of developing skill 
in the use of the file and cold chisel. Course LII. 

(5) Machine shop practice. Tool making, tool work, tool 
and screw work. Course LII. 

(6) Drawing.. Freehand, mechanical. Course LIII. 

II. Home Economics Course. 

Designed to train young women to administer intelligently and 
wisely the affairs of a home ; to afford thorough instruction in the prin- 
ciples that underlie artistic dressmaking; to train for positions as dress- 
makers, matrons, house-keepers, seamstresses and home makers. 

(1) Hand sewing. Materials, stitches, measurements, draught- 
ing and making. Course LXI. 

(2) Machine sewing. Care and use of machine and machine 
sewing. 

(3) Dressmaking. Measuring, drafting, cutting, fitting and 
making. Course LXI I. 

(4) Design. Use of pencil and water color; study of bows, 
gowns and drapery; the human form; designing gowns for home and 
street. Course LXIV. 

Cooking I. Theory and practice. Includes elementary cooking; 
classification of foods, principles of cooking and application. Eight 
periods a week through the year. Course LXVI. 

Cooking II. Theory and practice. Includes canning and pre- 
serving, invalid cookery and dietetics. Eight periods a week through 
the year. Course LXVI II. 

Home economics. Includes the home, household management, 
sanitation, home nursing, and laundry work. Two periods a week 
through the year. 



30 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

(8) Chemistry. General and analytic chemistry. Course 
XXIX. 

(9) Food analysis. The chemistry of foods. Course XXX. 

(10) Bacteriology. Principles, their significance and application 
to life. Course XXXIII. 

(11) Advanced chemistry. Courses XXXI and XXXII. 

(12) Physiology. Course XXIII. 

VII. Short Course in Dressmaking. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of girls 
who desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking and 
whose time and means are limited. This course embraces the follow- 
ing subjects: 

(1) Arithmetic. A' practical course in the elements; factoring: 
fractions; denominate numbers; household accounts, etc. Course X. 

(2) Grammar. A review of the elements of English Grammar. 

(3) Cookery. The underlying principles of cooking; daily prac- 
tice in cooking; table setting, serving, etc. Course LXVII-B. 

(4) Dressmaking. Instruction in hand sewing and dressmaking; 
the cutting, fitting and making of dresses; thorough drill in pattern 
drafting and dressmaking. Course LXIII. 

III. Fine Arts Course. 

Designed to afford a future course in fine arts; to train students to 
fill positions as teachers and supervisors of Drawing and Art Instruc- 
tion ; and to afford instruction in the principles of design and their 
application. 

( 1 ) Free hand drawing. Drawing in pencil and charcoal from 
ornament, still life and flowers. Course LXXI. 

(2) Applied design. Application of design to objects. 

(3) Historic ornament. Historic styles and drawings of the 
typical features of each. 

(4) Composition. Space relations, proportion, color harmony, 
etc. 

(5) Metal work. Problems in sheet metal. Course LXXIII. 

(6) Pottery. Hand made pieces; tiles; decorations; glazing and 
firing. Course LXXIV. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 31 

IV. Music Course. 

Designed to afford opportunity for culture as a fine art and to 
train teachers. 

( 1 ) Hand culture. 

(2) Sight reading. 

(3) Major and minor scales. 

(4) Phrasing. 

(5) Graded studies and studies from masterpieces. 

(6) Harmony. 

(7) Musical history. 

(8) Courses LXXV to LXXIX. 

V. Commercial Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to fit young men and young women for positions of re- 
sponsibility and trust in the business world, such as bookkeepers, office 
clerks, amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and teachers of commercial 
subjects. 

( 1 ) Spelling. A half-year course in both oral and written com- 
mercial spelling, including a careful drill in pronunciation, marking and 
defining. Course LXXXII. 

(2) Penmanship. A half-year course in rapid legible writing. 
Course LXXXIII. 

(3) Commercial arithmetic. Numerous problems such as will 
confront the student in the business affairs of life. Course LXXXV. 

(4) Bookkeeping. Single and double entry through various 
forms of business. Course LXXXIV. 

(5) Typewriting. The "touch" system. Cousre XC. 

(6) Commercial geography.. The natural and industrial re- 
sources of all important countries, routes, means of communication, etc. 
Course LXXXVI. 

(7) Commercial law. The various forms of commercial paper 
and the rights of the individual under the law. Course LXXXVII. 

VI. Stenographic Course. (One Year Course) 

Designed to prepare young men and young women for positions as 
amanuenses, typewriters, reporters and office clerks. 

1) Spelling. Oral and written spelling; especial attention to 
pronunciation and the marking and defining of words. Course 
LXXXII. 

(2) Penmanship. Plain, rapid, legible, business penmanship. 
Course LXXXIII. 



32 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

(3) English. Composition and Rhetoric based upon Lockwood 
and Emerson. Letter-writing, description, narration, punctuation, cap- 
italization, etc. Course II. 

(4) Shorthand. A thorough drill in combining the signs into 
words, phrases and sentences; drills for speed, practice in transcribing 
notes, class and office dictation, etc. Course LXXXIX. 

(5) Typewriting. "Touch" typewriting. Course XC. 

VII. Short Course in Dressmaking. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of girls 
who desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking and 
whose time and means are limited. This course embraces the follow- 
ing subjects: 

( 1 ) Arithmetic. A practical course in the elements ; factoring 
fractions; denominate numbers; household accounts, etc. Course XI. 

(2) Grammar. A review of the elements of English Grammar. 

(3) Cookery. The underlying principles of cooking; daily prac- 
tice in cooking; table setting, serving, etc. Course LXVII. 

(4) Dressmaking. Instruction in hand sewing and dressmaking; 
the cutting, fitting and making of dresses; thorough drill in pattern 
drafting and dressmaking. Course LXII. 

VIII. Short Course in Farm Engineering. (Winter Term) 

A three-months' winter course planned to meet the most practical 
requirements of young men on the farm. The course includes the fol- 
lowing lines of work: 

(1) Arithmetic. The elements; factoring; fractions; denomi- 
nate numbers; measurements of walls, tanks, bins, lands, etc., accounts 
with farm crops ; problems relating to the farm, as cost of fences, build- 
ings, silos, rations, etc. ; commercial paper, etc. Course XI. 

(2) Agriculture. Soil and Soil Water; Plant, Plant Food and 
Growth ; Rotation of Crops ; Germination ; Seed Testing ; Transplant- 
ing, etc. Course XX. 

(3) Carpentry. Tools; the joints and splices necessary in farm 
construction ; working drawings and construction in miniature. Course 
LIE 

(4) Blacksmithing. Pupils make from stock, tongs, hammer, 
chisels, rings, links, chains, devices, harrow teeth, etc. Course LII. 

(5) Engines. A study of steam engines, boilers, gas engines, 
power transmission, lubricants, etc., and stationary and traction engine 
practice. Courses LV to LVII. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



33 



co 


co 


CO 


NCI NCI 


«5 


> 






u 


Ih 

3 




(J 


bJ0< 


co 


* 




9r ™ 


C 






J2tt 


C3 




3 8 


J* 

O n3 
° C 

PQ as 




3 


Appl 

Engi 



en 

a! 

O 

u 

cfl 
H 

< 

— 

S3 
U 

w 



c 
W 



\CH 


NCI 


w\ 


h\ 




t— ( 


b'f 




3 


H 


S 


o 




OJ 


> 


o 


nd 




< 


CO 



w 



,C 


o 
u 


</3 





bo 




C 


__J 


W 


Ph 



w 



a 




S 




o 




U 




*J 


C3 




Ih 


. 


JO 


u 

.13 


& 


Ph 


< 



co 



a 



CXI iH 


CM tH 




P< 


u 


•S3 


g bjo 


2 3 


11 


5 a 




•C g 


C5 tf 


<J Ph 



O O 

W 3 



»h 

bo 



u 



U 



3 
o 

bo 

o 



Ph 



O 

Nj 



5s. 

M 

K 

'So •♦«» 

5M 



■5o§ 



CO 



^Qvj^ 






<M rH 


CO 






IH 


OjO 




CO 


A 




£ 


PI 


bjD w 


< 

1 

,3 


c3 

H 

r-H 

o 


O >> 


o 


• l-t 


O Ah 


s 


1- 



■4-3 

PI 



O O 

•;-. Q) 

J-ri-HI 
CD 0) 

•1-4 

u 5 

03 Pi 
CD-* 

"dp 



3 w 

CO 

CD 

Cfi > 

n o 

w to 

M X 
r-l a> 

CC] op 

. w 

o 3 

■HO 



.SB 

ss 

Sg 
11 

— W 

xi © 

c c 

a) 

.2 to 
,o« 

..« 

II 



SI 

-M CO 



31 

MU bo 



co <c; 

Ih O C 

°§§ 
..-gbe 
bJ0 3 

^ r ^© CO «o» 

■ -1*5-8 

11 ft o eg -o ^ ^ 
a bi m t^ © © ±i 

gaSg ..•§ 

® e © S-g g tj 

CO -u -i-> " > -*-" _ 
CO w C > 3 J? 

>X3^ <d co 2 g 



X5 3 — 
C0T3 3 



C O 1 ? CD 
CD£cD^fl©CD; 

5..KhOo5.S 

H^* * * Jhj5 
« * Ho 

<D g CCi 



o 



34 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



W 

on 

P 
O 
O 

o 

H 

CM 
CM 

w 

o 

w 

- 
o 
u 





CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


> 


> 










JS 


C/3 


<u 

> 


1 




• j*j 


"8 


*Xj 






C 


U 


cj 

CU 


ID 




W 


u 


3 


3 




co 


CO 


CO 


<o 












> 


»— ( 








1—1 


»— i 




>> 








C/5 
C/3 


a 


cu 




'bJO 


>> 


o 


CU 




C 


J3 


cu 




W 


Ph 


c 


3 




CO 


CO 


l-H l-H 

OS 
Ih 


CO 


h-l 


KH 








h-l 


HH 




1 1 Ih 








b£ 


"S cu 


V 




13) 




TJ O 


+J 




c 

w 


o 

H 




o 
cu 

3 




co 


CO 

>-» 
M 

o 

C/5 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


^-1 


s 










13 

CU 


C3 

J-l 


cu 




c 


G 
U 


& 


u 

cu 




W 


a 


< 


3 




CO 


(N rH 


CO 

o 


CO 
>> 


»-H 


§ 




•IHi 
<D 


Pi 




1 


5-i xfl 


g 


c3 




i 


O o 

•3 > 


,5 


fclD 
O 




Sh 


'C 


<D 




O 


W o 


<i 


o 







u 






> 












c 






3 






H3 






C 






m 






c^ 






<V 






b£ 






UJ 


















o 






CJ 




*J 


o 




Ih 






< 


CO 
CJ 




TJ 


G 




C 


rt 




ctf 


*-> 




CO 


C 




O 


cu 




c 






cu 


Ih 

o 




'u 


Mh 




C/3 


(A 




# o 


G 






cu 




C/3 

cu 


s 




a 

o 


cu 

_Ih 




Q 


a 4 

QJ 


QJ 


c/T 


Ih 


tn 


-•-* 




o 


Ih 

< 


13 
Ih 

CU 


u 


^CJ 


C 


CO 




cu 

bA 


■*-> 


hg 
u 

CO 


cu 

JZ 


o 


§ 


C/5 


_G 




cu 


bil 
3 


c" 




o 


S 

*h 


cu 




s 

o 


+j 


QJ 


bii 


o 


u 
cu 


C 


„ 


ft 


^c 


_c 


Ih 


'S3 

h 
13 


CO 


O 

u 

cu 


o 


rt s 






cu ^ 


PL, 


3 


h * 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 35 



Courses of Instruction 



ENGLISH 



In a practical school, the work in English is considered not the 
least practical of the various courses offered to the prospective student. 
To be an efficient citizen, one must not only be able to read intelligently, 
but also be able to give his thoughts to others plainly and concisely. 
The courses in English have been planned with a two-fold aim — to 
train the student in self-expression both in talking and in writing, and 
to cultivate the ability to read accurately and with appreciation. 

Training in self-expression is given throughout the four-years' 
work. The object of such training is to enable the pupil to express 
his own ideas freely, clearly and forcibly. As a basis, the first year 
student is required to review grammar, paying especial attention to 
the common mistakes found in written and spoken language. He studies 
the rules of punctuation and applies them in his written work, thereby 
forming correct habits. Letters, especially neat and exact business let- 
ters, short descriptions, stories, and themes, are required regularly. 

Beginning with the first year, the following requirements for 
written work are enforced. All written work must be neat and com- 
paratively free from mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation. 
All written work is corrected by the teacher and criticized that the pupil 
may see lines for improvement. The best work of each student, and 
certain required papers, are then copied into a permanent note-book. 
Study to improve self-expression in the second year's work includes 
formal rhetoric in connection with more numerous and longer themes. 
In the third and fourth years, work in debating, oratory, and declama- 
tion is required. Each student keeps a note-book with essays and themes 
on the literary history and masterpieces studied. 

Intelligent and appreciative reading is taught by the study of se- 
lected masterpieces of literature. Two days out of each week are given 
to this in first year English, three days each week in the other courses. 
Students are required to read aloud often, and in each course to memor- 
ize selections both in prose and poetry. Altho the technical points of 
the various forms of writing are discussed, the main aim in this work 
is to cultivate a love for the really great works of literature and to 
give the pupil a foundation on which to base his later readings. 



36 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Special attention is given in all classes to the student's spoken and 
written language. Errors in speech are corrected and explained when 
necessary. A pupil who, in any course, shows deficiency in grammar 
is required to take it, even though he may have credit in that subject. 
Neat, legible writing is required of every student ; special assistance 
is given in this, if the student needs it. Important and practical as it 
is that the student should acquire the ability to enjoy the literary mas- 
ters, it is deemed intensely practical and important that he should speak 
and write intelligently and correctly. 

Courses I, II and III, are required in all Industrial Courses. 
Course IV is elective. It is strongly advised, however, that all students 
take four courses of English. 

Course I. Grammar. 

Elementary. A thorough study of theoretical and applied gram- 
mar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the use of 
correct forms of speech with special attention to common errors. Ele- 
mentary composition. 

Course II. Literature I. 

(a) Review of English grammar; three recitations a week, for 
three months. 

(b) Elementary composition and rhetoric. Letter- writing, descrip- 
tion, narration. An average of three recitations per week for six 
months. Special emphasis put upon punctuation, spelling, capitaliza- 
tion, paragraph structure, figures of speech. Numerous short compo- 
sitions are required. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Macaulay's Horatius at the Bridge; 
Burroughs' Sharp Eyes; Dickens's Christmas Carol; Gray's Elegy; 
Hawthorne's Great Stone Face, My Visit to Niagara, The Ambitious 
Guests, Old Ticonderoga, The Great Carbuncle; Lowell's Vision of 
Sir Launfal; Hale's The Man Without a Country ;Trving's Rip Van 
Winkle, Legend of Sleepy Hollow. 

For reading: Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Poe's Gold Bug; 
Warner's A Hunting of the Deer, How I Killed a Bear, Lost in the 
Woods, Camping Out. 

Course III. Literature II. 

(a) Advanced composition and rhetoric, two recitations a week. 
Review and continued description and narration, usage, diction, clear- 
ness, force, elegance, paragraphing, principles of versification; periodic, 
balanced, loose, long and short sentences; figures of speech. Work in 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 37 

composition required throughout the year. Special attention given to 
exposition and argumentation. 

(b) Masterpieces for study: Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; Burns' 
The Cotter's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, To a Mountain Daisy, For 
A' That and A' That; Epistle to J. Lapraik, Highland Mary, To 
Mary in Heaven, My Heart's in the Highlands, Bruce to His Men 
at Bannockburn, Bonnie Doon; Addison's De Coverly Papers; Ma- 
caulay's Milton; Milton's Minor Poems; The Merchant of Venice; 
Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. 

For reading: As You Like It, The Iliad (Books 1, 6, 22, 24), 
The Lady of the Lake, Kipling's Captains Courageous. 

Course IV. Literature III. — Elective. 

(a) History of English Literature. 

(b) Written reviews are required of assigned plays and work. The 
composition work is based upon the masterpieces studied and takes the 
form of critical and biographical essays. 

(c) Masterpieces for study; Burke's Conciliation, Macbeth, Pal- 
grave's Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrics, Milton's Paradise Lost, 
Books I, and II., Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Bacon's Essays. 

For reading: Silas Marner, Julius Caesar, Ivanhoe; Tennyson's 
The Coming of Arthur, Launcelot and Elaine, Guinevere, The Pass- 
ing of Arthur. 

Course V. Literature IV — Elective. 

(a) History of American literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library supplemented 
by text books. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Aldrich's Baby Bell, Ale Yeaton's 
Son, Piscataqua River, The Little Violinist, Our New Neighbors at 
Poukapog; Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a Water-fowl, A Forest Hymn, 
The Flood of Years, The Green Mountain Boys, The Yellow Violet, 
To the Fringed Gentian ; Emerson's Compensation, Self-Reliance ; Lin- 
coln's First and Second Inaugural Addresses, Gettysburg Speech, The 
Emancipation Proclamation ; Poe's Raven and the Bells ; Taylor's Lars ; 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, and Adams and Jefferson ; Whit- 
tier's The Tent on the Beach. 

For reading: Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac; Hawthorne's 
House of Seven Gables or the Marble Faun ; Lodge's Life of Webster ; 



38 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Parkman's LaSalle ; Thoreau's The Succession of Forest Trees, The 
Apples, Sounds; Warner's My Summer in a Garden. 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

The courses are arranged to exhibit the essential elements in his- 
torical growth ; cause and effect ; the comparison of events ; the growth 
of institutions; the influence of environment; the value of the past in 
explaining the present. 

Course VI. American History. 

Europe in 1492; American colonization; the colonies; their strug- 
gles ; the American revolution, the Union ; the Civil War ; industrial 
growth; expansion. 

Course VII. Civics. 

Such study of the constitutional history of the United States from 
its beginning to the present time and such study <of the actual conditions 
of government in city, state and nation as is essential to prepare young 
men to become responsible citizens in the republic. 

General History I. Course VIII. 

This course includes a brief survey of the Oriental nations; a 
careful study of the lessons to be learned from the most important phases 
of Greek and Roman history; and a detailed study of the Romano- 
Teutonic period, emphasizing the fusion of the Classic, the Christian 
and the Teutonic elements which form the basis of the civilization of 
modern Europe. 

General History II. Course IX. 

The work outlined for this course is the rise and development of 
the modern nations; feudalism; the crusades; the rise of towns; the 
Renaissance; the periods of reform in religion and of revolution in 
government; and the recent history of the principal nations of today. 
The aim of this course is to enable the student to see the relation of 
the past to the political, intellectual, religious, industrial and social 
conditions of the present time. 

MATHEMATICS 

One of the aims in all of the courses in mathematics is to train 
the student in the acquiring of habits of accurate and logical reasoning. 
To this end many original problems, requiring individual and independ- 
ent effort, are assigned, and the student's knowledge of the subject is 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 39 

daily tested. Frequent reviews and quizzes are given in order that the 
various usbjects may be thoroly covered and mastered. In all courses 
the practical value of the subject is constantly emphasized and to this 
end blackboard illustrations, geometrical solids, and instruments of va- 
rious kinds are employed, supplemented by oral explanations and in- 
formal lectures. 

Course X. Arithmetic. One Year. 

A complete review of the essentials of arithmetic, including the 
fundamental processes, factoring, fractions, decimals, denominate num- 
bers, longitude and time, practical measurements and percentage, to- 
gether with the best methods of presenting these various subjects to 
pupils of the public schools. All abstract combinations are preceded, 
as far as possible, by constructive effort and the work made objective. 
In the more advanced units of study the subjects will be treated as 
they occur in actual business transactions regardless of text book limits. 

Course XI. Arithmetic. (Short Course) 

Industrial Arithmetic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon prob- 
lems pertaining to the farm. The work will involve factors, fractions, 
decimals, denominate numbers, practical measurements and percentage. 
Problems dealing with such themes as the cost of buildings, marketing, 
measurements, insurance, taxes and banking will be taught in the most 
practical business-like fashion. Daily through the Winter Term. 

Course XII. Algebra. One Year. 

All elementary algebra is covered up to and including quadratic 
equations, especial emphasis being laid on the fundamental laws of al- 
gebra, their derivation, and their relation to the solution of problems. 
The relation of algebra to arithmetic and to the higher branches of 
mathematics is constantly kept in mind and the advantages of algebra 
noted. 

Course XIII. Plane Geometry. One Year. 

Geometry, inductive and deductive. The student is thoroly 
grounded in the fundamental principles of the subject. Methods of 
reasoning; the classification of the various geometrical forms, lines, 
angles, and surfaces, and the various kinds of proofs. The relation of 
Geometry to Arithmetic. Especial emphasis on original and inventive 
work. The method of original demonstration thru analysis, construc- 
tion and proof. Many problems in engineering and surveying. 



40 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Course XIV. Solid Geometry. One-half Year. 

In order that the subject may be more easily comprehended, geo- 
metrical solids are employed in the demonstration of each proposition, 
and the students are also required, from time to time, to fashion out of 
cardboard various solids for use in demonstrating problems in construc- 
tion. The application of geometry to science and industry receives much 
attention. 

Course XV. Algebra II. One-half Year. 

The graph, quadratic equations reviewed and completed. The 
theory of proportion. Problems and formulae of physics. Progres- 
sions, Logarithms. 

Course XVI. Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. One Year. 

The theoretical part of the subject is practically completed at mid- 
year. Consideration of the surveying instruments including chain and 
tape, compass, level, transit, and planimeter. After spring opens prac- 
tically all of the time is devoted to field work. 

Natural Sciences 

The courses are designed to instruct the student in the facts, laws 
and methods of nature. The intimate relation that applied science 
bears to every day life indicates the imperative need of such courses in 
a general scheme of education. 

The biological laboratory occupies a part of the third floor of Car- 
negie Hall. The room is 30x60 feet, well lighted, and provided with 
desk room and apparatus to accommodate forty pupils. 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters on the fourth floor of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room and 
apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 25x35 feet conveniently 
arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Carnegie Hall. 
It is sufficiently equipped with table room and apparatus for thirty stu- 
dents working at one time. 

Laboratory and field work in the sciences is always a welcome 
and profitable diversion from continued study and recitation in the 
class room. The laboratory and field work are carefully directed so 
that observation and inference may be comprehensive and accurate. The 
methods of instruction are those of modern laboratories for which the 
equipment is ample. 

The following courses are offered, four years of which are con- 
stants for graduation. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 41 

Course XVII. Geography. 

A comprehensive and critical review of descriptive geography. The 
first half of the year is devoted to an extensive comparison of the topo- 
graphical features, the commercial advantages, and the development of 
industries of the different countries of the earth. 

Course XVIII. Physical Geography. 

The second half of the year is devoted to a study of the earth as 
a globe. Especial emphasis is laid upon the study of the constant 
changes apparent in the earth's surface, the various physical ages of 
the earth, the underlying causes, and effect upon mankind. As far as 
possible the most fundamental principles of this subject are brought out 
by actual observation in field work. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGY 

Course XIX. Agriculture I. 

Given only in summer terms. The course is planned with a view 
of covering the general phases of elementary Agriculture, emphasizing 
the phases of the work best suited for teaching in the rural schools. 
Collecting materials, securing literature, outlines of work and methods. 
The Agricultural Demonstration farm, containing about two hundred 
kinds of grains and vegetables, is available for field work. 

Course XX. Agriculture II. 

Winter term course designed to meet the needs of short-course farm 
boys. The most practical problems of local farming. Judging of crops 
and stock. Silos and silo-construction. Best types and breeds of ani- 
mals and crops. Milk testing and a number of other practical demon- 
strations before the class. 

Course XXI. Agriculture III. 

Fall and Winter terms. Required of students taking the course of 
ten and one-half months for rural teachers. For outline of course see 
Fall and Winter terms of Course IV. 

Course XXII. Agriculture IV. 

One Year. Fall term, Agronmoy. Weeds, — eradication, classi- 
fication and collection. Corn, — its value, reasons for growing, suit- 
able soils and climates, preparation of soil, methods of plaiting, cultiva- 
tion, harvesting, composition, by-products, value as feed. Seed selec- 
tion, corn breeding, and corn judging. Similar study of wheat, oats, 



42 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

barley, flax and forage crops. A little time is given to fiber crops. 
Winter term: Animal Husbandry. Horses, the prehistoric horse, the 
Arabian horse, breeds of horses, general anatomy, feeds and feeding, 
care and training, score card and judging practice. Similar study of 
swine, sheep, cattle and poultry. Demonstration of Babcock milk 
test, testing eggs, dressing poultry. Spring term. Landscape and 
vegetable gardening, and a general survey of soils. Study of campus 
with map drawing. Plans for farm houses and study of ornamental 
trees, shrubs and herbs. A vegetable garden 15x30 feet is assigned 
each student who is to manage every detail except the breaking of the 
soil. A number of experiments are performed on the plots dealing with 
plant diseases, spraying, fertilizers, etc. 

Course XXIII. Agriculture V. 

One year. Open only to students who have passed in Course IV. 
In both Courses IV., and V., each term is a unit within itself and is 
given one credit. Fall term. Farm management. Farm surveying. 
Instruments and their uses. A survey is made of the campus. Farm 
accounts, relation of farmer to our general economic system. The farm- 
er as the producer for society, taxation, banking, labor, and wages. 
Farm business papers — contracts, notes, deeds, mortgages. Problems in 
the choice of a farm. Various systems of farming — dry, truck, mixed 
and grain farming. Community organizations — breeders' associations, 
farmers' institutes, etc. Plans for building, practice in scaling and 
billing farm buildings. Winter term. Plant and animal diseases. 
Classification and study of troublesome insects. Bacterial and fungus 
diseases. Insecticides and fungicides. Comparative anatomy of horses 
and cows. Simple diagnosis of diseases. 

Spring term. Soils. Soil formation, brief geological history of the 
soil. Soil Physics, laboratory work. Bacteriology of soils — numbers, 
kinds and values of bacteria. Chemistry of soils, plant food, humus, 
etc. Commercial fertilizers, barnyard manure, crop rotations. 

Course XXIV. Zoology. 

First Semester. Seven periods a w T eek. The entire field of gen- 
eral zoology. Dissection of type animals. Note-books. The labora- 
tory is equipped with compound microscopes and all needful apparatus. 
The subject is presented from the scientific standpoint with adequate 
attention to practical phases of the subject. 

Course XXV. Botany. 

Second Semester. Seven periods ajweek. The general field of 
Botany is covered. Emphasis is placed on the practical and agricultu- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 43 

ral phases of the subject. It is not, however, agricultural botany. The 
laboratory is equipped with many specimens, projection lantern, com- 
pound microscopes and all needed apparatus. A herbarium collection 
of thirty plants is required. The physiological topics are demonstrated 
before the class. 

Course XXVI. Physiology. 

Physiology and Hygiene is offered five hours per week for one 
term. The general physical structure of the human body is studied 
carefully. The processes of nutrition, circulation, excretion and res- 
piration are examined in detail. Experiments and dissections are car- 
ried on with as much detail as is necessary to get an insight into the 
vital processes of life. Hygiene is made an important part of the work. 
This subject is required of all students taking the Normal Course or 
the Home Economics Course. 

Course XXVII. Physics A. 

Five hours a week for the year. This course consists of lectures 
experiments and recitations. The experiments are simple, yet full and 
exhaustive. Especial attention is given to the solution of problems in- 
volving physical laws and formulae. A series of forty-eight experi- 
ments is prescribed and performed by students during the year and care- 
ful tabulations are made of the results. Especial attention is given 
to the fundamentals that lead up to the various courses in engineering. 

Course XXVIII. Physics B. 

Five hours a week for the year. Lectures will be given to cover 
the more advanced work in mechanics, the practical appliances on heat, 
light, and electricity and the more complex formulae for solving. Physi- 
cal problems. Laboratory work will be given, which has especial 
bearing on the topics studied and which will be of particular benefit to 
the student specializing in the Mechanic Arts. Prerequisite, Physics A. 

Course XXIX. General Chemistry. 

Five hours a week for six months. Three periods a week are de- 
voted to the study of the laws, theories, formulae and fundamental 
principles of chemistry and to the solution of problems in chemical 
arithmetic. Two double periods each week are devoted to laboratory 
work. Over one hundred experiments involving chemical change, af- 
finity, valence, etc., are performed and noted so that the student both 
becomes familiar with the manipulation of apparatus and masters the 
laws governing phenomena. 



44 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Course XXX. Chemistry of Foods. 

Daily throughout the Fall term. Designed eespecially for young 
women who are pursuing domestic science courses. The essential ma- 
terials in a complete food ; the reactions that occur in their preparation 
for use ; the common adulterations ; the foods in which commonly found ; 
ho wrecognized ; household tests, etc. Prerequisite, courses XXVI, 
XXVII, 

Course XXXI. Qualitative Analysis. 

Daily for the first four and one-half months. .Lecture once a 
week. Laboratory work four times a week. The course consists of a 
systematic study of the bases, and elements and radicals, and a method 
of analyzing an unknown substance of complex composition. Em- 
phasis is placed on such methods as can be used in quantitative deter- 
minations. Prerequisites, General Chemistry and Elementary Quali- 
tative Analysis. 

Course XXXII. Quantitative Analysis. 

Five times a week for the last half of the year. Two and one- 
half months given to gravimetric analysis and two months given to 
valumetric analysis. Some simple substances that illustrate the funda- 
mentals of quantitative work, are taken up first. Then such as pig 
iron, steel, cement, soil, water for potable purposes, water for boiler 
purposes are analyzed. Prerequisites, General Chemistry, Quantitative 
Analysis and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

Course XXXIII. Bacteriology 

Five hours a week for the Spring term. Arranged to meet the 
needs of domestic science students. Recitations and experiments. The 
yeast plant is studied in all the important details of its life habits. Es- 
pecial attention is given to the molds and bacteria of the household. The 
life habits of the bacilli, their relations to health and disease, the 
precautions that should be taken in preventing infection are dealt with 
extensively. 

EDUCATION 
Course XXXIV. Elementary Pedagogy. 

A brief course in the principles and methods of teaching and gen- 
eral school management offered to students who are unable to remain 
in school a sufficient length of time to complete a full course. This 
course includes a brief study of the presentative, representative and re- 
flective powers ; the ends of education ; the means ; the principles in- 
volved ; general methods ; methods in particular branches, etc. 







Ui 


4bi <** # 


i , 






: R f :--7^. ;* 


^»«Mp^ 


&"UV J 1 


"""' Jl 




C-.J 


» ^^^htfl 


<m 


BH| -*"■"' , ^jH| ^dflf 


Crf 


^H^mII fBfir^ 


€ 1 




vii 


ll i JJi3 3l| * 


\M 


J| V' 4 '1 ^ 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 45 

Course XXXV. Psychology. 

Introductory Psychology. This course purposes to give the general 
characteristics and laws of mental life, the functions of the various 
mental processes, and the ai.ms and methods of modern psychology. The 
work involves text-book work, lectures and essays. 

Advanced Psychology. The study of mental development in its 
relation to heredity and environment — the physical nature of the child, 
his instincts and capacities with their individual variations. 

Course XXXVI. History of Education. 

A study of the educational systems of the chief nations of antiquity ; 
education in its relation to Christianity; the Renaissance, the Reforma- 
tion and the forces operative in our own era; a study of the life and 
practices of the chief educational reformers in the light of prevailing 
theories. Numerous outside reading and class reviews are required. 

Course XXXVII. Philosophy of Education. 

A study of the agencies of civilization ; the broad conception of 
education ; the biological, physiological, sociological and psychological 
aspects of education. Especial attention is given to such themes as the 
Place of the Body in Education, the Influence of Body on Mind, Physi- 
cal Education, Environment, Racial Experience, and the Notion of 
Self-Activity. 

Course XXXVIII. Economics of Manual Training. 

Spring Term, two periods per week. The organizations of manual 
training in public school courses, aim and practice, the history and lit- 
erature of manual training; equipment and supplies; correlation; man- 
ual training and mental development; instruction and control, etc. 

Course XXXIX. Reviews and Methods. 

The subject matter of arithmetic, grammar, history and geography 
reviewed ; the principles and methods of teaching emphasized. The 
work is especially designed to train students to teach. The subject 
matter, teacher's aim, method, preparation and presentation are care- 
fully considered with special reference to the grades. 

Course XL. Reviews and Methods. 

A continuation of the above course, Fall and Winter Terms. 

Course XLI. Observation and Practice. 

Designed to train prospective teachers in the principles and methods 
of effective teaching. The opportunity for observation and practice 



46 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

teaching is found in the classes of the preparatory department, the de- 
partment of manual training, and the department of domestic science 
and arts. Both observation and practice take place under the direct 
supervision of a trained teacher, who is thoroughly capable not only 
of directing the efforts of pupil-teachers but of offering the most helpful 
and painstaking criticism. 

Course XLII. Sociology. 

This course naturally follows Civics. A general study of the 
basic principles of sociology is followed by class and individual topic 
work on the great sociological problems of present day life. Wide read- 
ing of the best authorities, both in books and periodicals of standard 
worth, is required. 

The following topics are included in the work covered: Immigra- 
tion, social and industrial co-operation; sociological phases of the labor 
question ; woman's place in the industrial world ; child labor ; socialism ; 
organized charity including the Hull House movement ; criminology ; 
social aspects of the theatre; play ground associations; the church and 
school as social centers ; the Negro problem ; divorce ; the liquor prob- 
lem. Education as the only safe basis of democratic government is the 
final theme of the course. 

LATIN 

The study of the Latin language has given character to modern 
minds by the habits of discrimination and analysis which it requires, 
and has largely contributed to the marked advancement of science and 
reasoning. The analysis of language cultivates acuteness and pre- 
eminent literary taste, and inspires the student with a love of research. 
In Latin is found the strength, precision and order of the old Roman. 
Attention is given to correct writing, the study of idioms and synonyms, 
translations into English and the history of its literature. The relation 
of the language to English is always kept in mind and similarities noted. 

Course XLIII. Latin I. 

The elements. Daily throughout the year. Careful stndy and 
practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections and syntax, a gaining 
of a working vocabulary. Translating of simple prose. Much time 
and emphasis is placed upon the translation of English into Latin. Word 
formation also receives considerable attention. 

Course XLIV. Latin II. 

Caesar. Daily throughout the year. Four books; translation 
into clear idiomatic English; construction of every word; the life of 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 47 

Caesar; the Roman government of his time; the formation of the Ro- 
man army; sight reading; prose composition based upon the text of 
Caesar. 

Course XYV, Latin HI. 

Daily throughout the year. Six orations; four in Catalinam, De 
Imperio Pompei or Pro Marcello and Pro Archia; the life of Cicero; 
the history of his time; Roman oratory; syntax of each word; sight 
reading; prose composition based on the text; memorizing of especial 
passages of Pro Archia. 

Course XL VI. Latin IV. 

Vergil — Elective. Daily throughout the year. Six books of the 
Aeneid ; syntax ; grammatical peculiarities ; translation into clear idio- 
matic English ; occasional metrical translation ; the life of Vergil ; the 
history of his times ; the mythology of the Aeneid ; the versification of 
the Aeneid. 

GERMAN 

The course is designed to enable the student to use this language 
with facility in ordinary reading, writing and speaking; to supply the 
insight only to be obtained by a studw of language other than one's 
own ; to give the student a key to the riches of German literature. Ac- 
curacy and facility of translation are sought by means of a careful 
grammatical drill and a generous amount of reading. Composition 
forms a necessary part of the instruction. Especial emphasis is laid 
upon the acquiring of a correct pronunciation. The class is conducted 
in German. 

Course XLVII. Elementary German. 

For beginners. Special attention is given to correct pronunciation, 
the principles of grammar, the conversion of simple prose from Ger- 
man into English and from English into German, and to conversation 
exercises. 

Collar's First Year German. 

Bacon's Im Vaterland. 

Course XL VIII. German Reading. 

Review of the grammar ; practice in translating from German 
into idiomatic English ; written exercises based on a text and Harris' 
Composition, and Joynes-Meissner's Grammar; Hans Anderson's Bil- 
derbuch ohne Bilder, Storm's Immensee, Gerstacker's Germelshausen, 



48 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Dillard's Aus dem deutschen Dichterwald, Heyse's L/Arrabiata, Bene- 
dix's Die Hochzeitsreise, Schiller's Der Neffe als Onkel, etc. 

Course XLIX. Classic German. 

Joynes-Meissner's Grammar. Suderman's Johannes; Lessing's 
Minna von Barnhelm ; Goethe's Egmont; Freytag's Die Journalisten, 
Scholler's Wilhelm Tell, etc. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANIC ARTS. 

The purpose is two-fold: 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity for 
specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 

Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this 
work; no school in the state is so well equipped. The shops and labor- 
atories are well supplied with every modern appliance which can aid 
in acquiring practical knowledge of industrial subjects. A visit will 
convince. 

In the following outline Mechanic Arts Subjects are marked 
(M) ; professional or Normal-Manual Training Course subjects 
(P) ; short course subjects (S). 

Course. L. Hand-Work for Primary Grades. (P) Fifth year. 
Six weeks. 

(1) Paper and cardboard construction. This work is taken 
up as it should be presented in the public schools. The different steps 
in paper folding are given, developing into the construction of familiar 
articles. The use of paste and scissors is developed early in the course. 
Freehand cuting is given for training the eye in regard to form and for 
composition. Portfolios, booklets, boxes, etc., are constructed of heavy 
paper and cardboard. 

(2) Clay modeling and pottery. Some training is given in 
modeling type forms from simple objects in nature. The greater share 
of the time is devoted to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces involv- 
ing different methods of construction. In the third and fourth grades 
simple incised ornament is studied. The class is instructed in the craft 
of mould made pieces and a few pieces are made by the class. Students 
glaze a part of their work. 

(3) Weaving and basketry. Weaving begins with the use of 
paper mats, different patterns being worked out in several media. The 
materials included are raffia, jute, common woolen yarns and, for the 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 49 

fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of the finest quality. Problems in- 
clude pencil bags, book bags, holders, mats, special designed rugs, ham- 
mocks and larger rugs. Baskettry consists of the problems used in ele- 
mentary grades, simple rattan mats and baskets, handles, hinges, etc. 
Coiled mats and simple baskets are executed and a few methods of 
using raffia and constructive work are illustrated. 

(4) Thin wood construction. The assembling of thin pieces 
of wood b ymeans of glue and brads to form iniature pieces of furni- 
ture; the construction of a miniature house. The work consists, in 
part, of a combination of wood and cardboard. 

Course LI. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 
(P.) Fifth Year. Twelve weeks. 

( 1 ) Woodwork for fourth and fifth grades. The purpose 
here is to train the prospective teacher in the simpler processes in wood 
construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction in- 
tended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, they 
are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, for original 
design. The work is similar in character to courses offered in the ele- 
mentary grades of any first class public school system. The tools used 
are the knife, block plane, back saw, coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, 
carving punch, file, try-square, hammer, rule and pencil. For most 
of the exercises the material is prepared in thickness before being given 
to the student. Workmanlike methods are aimed at ; blue prints of the 
course are made. 

(2) Woodwork for the sixth, seventh and eighth grades. 
Here serious attention is first given to following the methods of the 
skilled mechanic. It is the aim to keep always in mind the interest and 
capacity of the pupils being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the public 
schools where there is an equipment of workbenches and a rather full 
set of tools. In, the seventh and eighth grades there are numerous 
exercises in cabinet making in which the simpler methods of joinery are 
involved. The use of sandaper, filer, stains and varnish is introduced 
in finishing some of the pieces. 

Course LII. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full *Me- 
chanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive exercises in 
Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construction, Wood Carving, 
Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and Design. 



50 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

(i) Joinery. (M and S.) First year, 18 weeks. 

{a) Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, chisel, 
hammer ,square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and other hand tools, 
in the construction of th principal joints employed m carpentry and 
joinery. 

(b) When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful 
articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

(c) Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a desk, 
table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order that they 
may make further application of the principles they have learned. 

(d) Advanced cabinet making; practice in the application of the 
principles of Joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, settees, stands, 
pedestals and cabinets of various designs. Pieces to be finished in ap- 
proved manner. 

(2) Elementary cabinet making. First year. 18 weeks. 

(3) Forging. (M, P and S.) Second year. 27 weeks. 

(a) Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, torming angles 
from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms of welding 
iron and mild steel. 

(b) This course includes a number of useful articles, including a 
bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, togns, hook and chain, clevis, cold 
chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making and 
tempering machine tools. 

Foundry Work (M and P). Nine weeks. 

Molding and core work; melting and casting iron and brass; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices; the mixing of iron; 
the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting of brass and other 
soft metals. 

Students make all cartings for Machine Shop wark. 

Advanced Joinery (M & P). Four weeks. 

(4) Turnery. (M and P.) Six weeks. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, screw, 
hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises through which 
the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, concave 
curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turning, togeth- 
er with exercises combining either a number, or all, of these operations. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 51 

(5) Useful articles in which the principles learned in (a) are paplied, 
including a box with cover, a vase, handles for various tools; a mallet, 
spindles for porch work or furniture, stair balusters and various other 
useful articles. This work is carried further in its application in pat- 
tern marking. 

(6) Patternmaking. (M and P.) 14 weeks. 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given to the 
work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made of a num- 
ber of models which involve the more elementary problems in foundry 
practice,' these are followed by patterns of parts of machines, includ- 
ing a hand-wheel and blanks for a cam, gear-wheel and bevel-gear. 

(7) Chipping and filing. (M and S.) Fourth year. 6 weeks. 

(a) Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill in the 
use of the file and the cold-chisel. These tools are of especial value in 
almost every line of mechanical work, as, for instance, in erecting and 
repairing machinery khether in the shop or on the farm. Their useful- 
ness is so well known, and the inability of the average man to use them 
properly is also so well known, that it seems proper to give them es- 
pecial attention in this course. 

(b) In connection with and in addition to the above a number 
of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 

(8) Machine shop practice. (M and P.) 

(a) Machine tool making. Students make and temper the tools 
which they will use in their Machine Tool Practice. 

(b) Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms of 
machine toolsh* directions for operating machines and keeping tools in 
order; practice in centering and in plain, taper, and template turning, 
chucking, drilling, boring, external and internal thread cutting; hand 
tool turning, polishing and filing. 

(c) Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, micrometer and 
Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps and dies, machine 
screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In this course the machine work 
is done on the articles cast in the foundry during the preceding year. 
The greater share of the machine tool practice of the entire course con- 
sists in machining the products of the foundry. 

(d) Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, a 
lathe, or some other project involving similar operations. 

Course LIII. Drawing and Design. 

(1) Manual training design. Study of the elements of de- 
sign, line, dark and light and color and the application of the principles 



52 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

of harmony. The object of the instruction is to develop appreciation 
through the study of art-structure. The course begins with design in 
the abstract, harmonious arrangement of spaces being given special at- 
tention. Application of the theory of design in technical problems; 
designs for furniture; textiles, wall coverings, stained glass, interiors, 
etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 

(2) Mechanical drawing — first year. (3 hours per week.) 
(M.) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instruments, 
with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

(c) Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in mechanical 
drawing;; especial attention give nto accuracy of construction. 

(d) Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of planes 
in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive geometry, is 
the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. In connection with 
it students are required to bring to class shop sketches or freehand 
working drawings of various articles. Instrumental drawings are 
made from some of these sketches. 

(3) Mechanical drawing — second year ( hours per week.) 
(M.) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, prop- 
erly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental drawings, made to 
scale, from sketches in ( 1 ) . 

(c) Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

(4) Mechanical drawing — third year. (3 hours per week.) 
(M.) 

(a) Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

(b) Descriptive geometry. Graphical methods of solving prob- 
lems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application in sheet 
metal pattern making. Problems include patterns of stovepipe elbow, 
a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All articles in this course, of which 
patterns are made, are constructed either of metal or paper. 

(c) Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story frame 
dwelling or other frame building. This course is made very practical. 
After the rough sketches have been made, the floor, basement and foot- 
ing plans are drawn to scale, also sectional wall views showing the con- 
struction ; and at least two views of the completed structure — the draw- 
ings including roof plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Sped- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 53 

fications are drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building mate- 
rials and labor is made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the 
complete set of plans. Special students are carrying this work further 
and are actually building models in the shop, in which the methods of 
construction are identical with thos used in actual house building. 

(5) Mechanical drawing — fourth year. (3 hours per week.) 
(M.) 

(a) Lettering and conventional representations of frequently re- 
curring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, etc. 

(b) Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in projection 
of complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct dimensions sup- 
plied from measurements. Sketches to be neat and clear and dimensions 
properly placed. 

(c) Working drawings fro msketches. Finished working draw- 
ing from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings to be inked, 
others to be traced and from the tracings blue prints made. 

(d) Machine design. Students to make original design of me- 
chanical appliance or machine. 

Course LIV. Engines. (P and S.) 

A study of the different types of steam engines, single, double, sim- 
ple and compound, advantages and disadvantages of each. The steam 
valve, its motion and the different mechanisms by which the motion is 
obtained. 

(a) Appliances. A thorough study of the hydrostatic and me- 
chanical methods of supplying lubrication. The indicator as a means 
of studying pressure, correct valve setting, the construction and appli- 
cation of the Prony brake, tests for both indicated and brake horse- 
power. 

(b) Speed regulating device. The study of the different forms 
of governors, weights, springs and dash-pots. The application of cer- 
tain forms of governors to certain kinds of engines. Engine practice. 

Course LV. Boilers (M and S). 

The study of the more common types of boilers, safety devices, 
feed pumps, feed water heaters and injectors, boiler testing, boiler re- 
pairs and boiler comopunds, furnaces, grates, stokers and ash handling 
machinery. Boiler practice. 

Course LVI. Gas Engines (M and S). 

Gas engine principles, types and regulating devices; methods of 
ignition. In this course special attention will be given to the adjust- 



54 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

ment of working parts supplemented by talks on gas engine fuels and 
their manufacture. Gas Engine practice. 

Course LVII. Power Transmission (M and S). 

The various methods employed in the transmission of power and 
the application of the more common types; shaftings and bearings; bab- 
bitting; couplings; pulleys; tooth and friction gears; clutches; rope and 
chain drives; belts and belting; splicing and lacing; practical problems 
in figuring the size and speed of pulleys for required conditions of work, 
belt slippage and preventatives. 

Course LVIII. Applied Mechanics (M). Fifth year. 18 weeks. 

Course LIX. Engines and Boilers (M). Fifth year. 18 weeks. 

Course LX. Vocational (M). Fifth year 3* weeks. 

One year's work chosen from the following: Carpentry and 
building construction; joinery and cabinet making; concrete construc- 
tion; electric wiring; painting; interior finishing and decorating; archi- 
tectural drawing; machine drawing; blacksmithing ; machine shop prac- 
tice; steam and gas engines. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student work done 
in this department. 

The student will be charged a shop fee of one dollar, payable in 
advance, for each year's work in any of the courses in Mechanic Arts. 



DOMESTIC ARTS AND SCIENCE. 

The course is designed to afford instruction in the subjects which 
pertain to life in the home. The training to be obtained through motor 
activity is regarded as one of the principal educational functions of both 
domestic science and art ; the sociological and ehtical value of such work 
is emphasized. 

The department occupies the entire Home Economics Building 
with sewing rooms, kitchen, dining and recitation room and fitting room. 

The sewing rooms are large, well lighted and commodious. They 
are equipped with sewing machines, lockers, charts, cutting tables, in- 
dividual tables, dress forms and wall cases for the purpose of exhibiting 
the work, etc. The best fashion magazines are received regularly. 

The kitchen is supplied with desks for individual work, equipped 
with all the necessary cooking utensils; gas stoves; electric plates for 
individual use ; gas range ; coal range ; refrigerator ; cupboards ; kitchen 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 55 

cabinet; sink, and the cooking utensils necessary to provide the best fa- 
cilities for class work. 

The dining room is equipped with dining table, dining chairs, china 
closet, buffet, etc. It is also supplied with china, silver, linen, etc. 

The recitation room is supplied with reference books, charts and 
magazines devoted to the subject of domestic science. 

Course XLI. Plain Sewing. 

A beginning course in sewing. Elements of plain and fancy hand 
sewing. Use and care of sewing machines. Each student is expected to 
complete a four-piece suit of cotton underwear, one tailored shirtwaist, 
one fancy cotton waist and one simple cotton dress. Students draft all 
their own patterns to exact measures. Students are required to provide 
themselves with Snow's Success Drafting System. 

At odd times during the year students have opportunity to acquire 
a practical working knowledge of household sewing, including towels, 
pillow cases, table linen, etc. Students furnish all their own materials, 
rials. 

Course LXII. Dressmaking A. 

Advanced Course in Sewing. A thorough study in foundation pat- 
tern drafting. Practice in designing patterns of any desired style. Sev- 
eral weeks are given over entirely to pattern making and designing. 

Each student is required to make at least one fancy woolen or silk 
waist, one tailored skirt, one woolen dress and one fancy cotton dress. 
Students are required to furnish all their own materials. 

Course XLIII. Dressmaking. 

A half-day daily throughout the winter term. Instruction given in : 

( 1 ) Hand Sewing. Making of simple garments by hand to illus- 
trate the use of plain and fancy stitches. 

(2) Dressmaking. Cutting, fitting and making of waists and 
dresses; thorough drill in pattern drafting and dressmaking; choice and 
suitability of dress materials; color and color combinations. While the 
degree of skill acquired depends upon the individual, a pupil of average 
ability should be able to master the elements of dressmaking by diligent 
application during the term. Open only to short course students. 

Course LXIV. Domestic Art Design. 

The elements of design ; line, light, shade, color ; principles of har- 
mony; the appreciation of structure. The course, in part, is devoted to 
the application of the theory of design to technical problems such as 



56 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

designs for basketry, rugs, wall decoration, textiles, stenciling, etc. Re- 
quired in Normal Courses. 

Course LXV. Applied Design. 

The elements of design applied in construction and surface deco- 
ration. The instruction follows two lines: a study of the principles of 
design in the abstract, color theory being given special attention, and 
the application of the principles of technical problems such as art needle- 
work, applique pillows, table runners, designs for embroidered shirt 
waists, towels, belts, etc. Required in Industrial Courses. 

Course LXVI. 

cookery, theory and practice 

i. Junior year. Classification of foods according to food prin- 
ciples ; value of each to the body ; effect of heat, and resulting changes in 
digestibility ; food ecenomy, physiological and pecuniary ; selection and 
care of foods. 

Laboratory — Three two-hour periods each week through the year. 

Theory — Two one hour recitation periods each week. This course 
must be accompanied or preceded by first year chemistry. 

Course LXVII. 

2. Senior year. Theory and practice of the principles of the 
first year's work are elaborated and applied in the second year. Preser- 
vation of foods is ipcluded. 

Individual demonstrations of methods used in the preparation of 
foods, accompanied by lectures on the topics and materials thus illus- 
trated, are required. These demonstration lectures are given by each 
senior in turn, before students and members of the faculty. 

The planning, marketing, directing and preparing, and serving of 
meals, including computation of cost for each item. The inviting, re- 
ceiving, and entertaining of guests. This work is required of each stu- 
dent in turn. 

Serving. Study of principles underlying the effective and attractive 
serving of food at formal and informal meals, also of refreshments at 
various social functions. Practical work. 

Dietetics. Study of foods and their relation to the body. Food 
values; proportions of tissue-building and energy-producing substance, 
digestibility and ease of assimilation, monetary value ot nutrients con- 
tained. Foods suitable for infants, for adults under varying conditions, 
and for invalids. Food combinations and calculation of dietaries; the 
study of dietetic and economic problems. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 57 

Laboratory — Three two-hour periods each week through the year. 
Theory — Two one-hour recitation periods each week. 

Domestic Science B. 

Cookery. Daily throughout the winter term. A study of the un- 
derlying principles of cooking. Daily practice in cooking, table setting, 
serving and buying. Open to short course students. 



household economics 

Household Management. Study of materials used in finishing, 
decorating, and furnishing a house, their comparative cost, durability, 
and care; ordering and arrangement of housework under varying con- 
ditions. Practical application of the processes of cleaning is made by 
students under direction. 

Laundry Work. Mineral constituents of different waters, soft- 
ening and cleansing agents, their effect upon fabrics and colors; removal 
of stains ; use of starches and bluings ; preparation of articles for laun- 
dering. Practical work includes laundering of bed and body linen, thin 
gowns, shirt-waist suits ; washing of woollens and cleaning of laces and 
delicate articles. 

Study of the home. Evolution of the home ; hosuehold indus- 
tries; household service. The dwelling; arrangement, decoration, and 
furnishing. 

Household Business. Household accounts; methods of payment; 
contracts; orders; other matters of business usage. The computing of 
cost of menus. Division of incomes for family groups in different cir- 
cumstances and environments. 

3. Home Nursing. The formal work includes the study of foods 
and diet, digestion, and nutrition ; discussion as to the location, fur- 
nishing, and sanitation of the sick room; the details of the care of a 
patient in the home; the intelligent keeping of memoranda to aid the 
physicians in watching the progress of the disease; prevention and care 
of contagious diseases. Occasional lectures and demonstrations by 
physicians. Practical work under a trained nurse, in the college in- 
firmary, including emergency relief and first aid to the injured. 

Sanitation, general and household. Lectures and reference work 
on the following topics: Relation of micro-organisms to the water, ice, 
and milk supp*lies ; and to the various uncooked foods ; disposal of garbage 
and sewage; prevention of common transmissible diseases; care by the 
public of public buildings and streets. 



58 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Course XLIX. Teachers' Training Course. 

This course is planned to prepare students to teach either Domestic 
Science or Domestic Art. 

It includes: Cost and choice of equipments, courses of study, les- 
son plans, running expenses, practice teaching, and individual criticism. 

Open only to senior students who are completing the five years' 
course in Domestic Science. Two periods a week during second se- 
mester. 



Course LXX. Mechanical Drawing. 

The purpose of this course is to give sufficient knowledge of me- 
chanical drawing and methods of construction to enable girls to plan 
and make working drawings of household articles, cabinets and furni- 
ture; also to plan and make drawings of a frame cottage. 



DRAWING AND FINE ARTS. 

The department offers thorough instruction in fine and decorative 
arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the second floor of Carnegie 
Hall, and there is ample equipment of casts and studio furnishings. The 
department aims to give thorough instruction in the principles of draw- 
ing and painting; to enlarge the student's acquaintance with what is 
best in art ; to offer courses of instruction adapted to the needs of teach- 
ers in the public schools and supervisors of art instruction in city schools. 
With serious study a high degree of efficiency and technical knowledge 
may be attained here at a much less expense than would be incurred 
for similar instruction in a large city. 

Not "art for art's sake," but art for the enrichment of life is the 
conception held here. Artistic taste and appreciation of the beautiful 
are needed in the humblest and busiest life. Especial emphasis is placed 
upon the application of the principles of fine arts to the environment 
of the every day life. 

Course LXXI. Fine Arts. 

A general course in appreciation and combining the essentials in 
drawing, painting and composition. A study of form using different 
media — charcoal, pencil, water color and oil. Still life and flower 
painting in water color. Study of composition by using flowers and 
landscapes. Figure sketching, advanced composition and illustration in 
charcoal and water color. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 59 

Course LXXII. Normal Art. 

Study of form by use of charcoal, pencil and color; color theory; 
hue, intensity and textile values ; relation of complemetnary colors, etc. ; 
simple design problems based on public school work, illustrating the 
uses of the elements and principles of design. Landscape in black and 
white, study of values working from black and white up to five and 
seven tones; figure sketching; illustrating. 

Course LXXIII. Metal Work. 

The problems given are considered in relation to each other in order 
to develop a general knowledge of sheet metal work. Processes include 
forming, sawing, filing and building by hard and soft soldering, riveting, 
etc., together with the study of the processes of repousee, etching and 
coloring. 

Course LXXIV. Pottery. 

The course begins with the building of hand-made pieces of differ- 
ent sizes and shapes; the making of tiles together with decoration by 
relief and incised lines; building of pilaster models; casting of moulds 
and pouring and finishing of mould-made pieces. Students glaze and 
fire a part of their work. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial School 
comprises instruction in piano, voice, chorus work, harmony, history of 
music, music theory and science of music. Special efforts are made to 
make clear to the students the importance of technical work and the 
study of touch, accentuation and tone coloring. This leads to an un- 
derstanding of what it means to interpret music and a thorough concep- 
tion of the art of expression and artistic execution. The main purpose 
of piano study is to enable the student to understand what music is; 
help him understand that music, like all other art, must touch the 
soul of man, or interpret the soul of man — and be an expression of 
character, personality and individuality. 

Course LXV. Preparatory. 

Course in hand culture; major scales; Byer's method for beginners, 
or Czerny Op. 599. 

Course LXVI. First Year. 

Elementary technic ; Loeschern Op. 65 ; Lichner Sonatinas, album 
of instructive and interesting pieces. 



60 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Course LXXVII. Second Year. 

Elementary technic continued ; Loeschern Op. 66 ; Heller Op. 47 ; 
albums of instructive and interesting pieces by the best composers. 

Course LXXVIII. Junior Year. 

Plaidy Technical Studies ; Cramer Octave Studies ; Heller Op. 47 ; 
Czerny School of Velocity Op. 299; Haydn and Mozart Sonatas. Se- 
lections from Schumann, Grieg, Heller, Nevin and others. 

Course LXXIX. Senior Year. 

Advanced technical work continued ; Cramer Studies ; Mozart and 
Beethoven Sonatas; Selections from Chopin, Schumann, Bach, Liszt, 
Rubenstein and other modern and classical composers. 



VOCAL MUSIC. 

The course in vocal music is designed to afford a thorough and com- 
prehensive training in the elements; to secure accuracy and rapidity 
in sight reading and singing; to develop a taste for the best grades of 
music, and to prepare students to teach the subject systematically in all 
grades of the public schools. 

Course LXXX. Public School Music. 

Designed to enable students to teach such principles of music as 
will apply in the several grades of the public schools. Instruction is 
given in time, tune, technique and the aesthetics of music. These sub- 
jects are exemplified in practice. Emphasis is laid upon the elements, 
theory of scale formation, melodic construction, elements of notation 
and harmony. The student becomes thoroughly familiar with the best 
in grade music. Daily throughout the year. 

Course LXXXI. Choral Singing. 

Daily chorus practice for a brief period is given the entire school. 
This class is made up of the entire body of students and attendance is 
compulsory. Constant practice is had on such compositions as lie within 
the range and understanding of the pupils. 



COMMERCIAL ARTS. 

We live in a great commercial country and there is today a rapidly 
increasing demand for trained men and women. Bookkeepers, Stenog- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 6i 

raphers, Typewriters, Clerks and Office Assistants are needed in every 
avenue of business. The time required to fit one's self in these lines is 
so comparatively short that any young man or young woman can afford 
to avail himself or herself of the opportunity. One drawback has been 
the expense. Few young men and women feel that they can afford the 
excessive fees charged by the numerous business schools. Such schools 
are organized as a business venture; they offer instruction in but a few 
branches and have no other means of support. Living expenses are high 
and the tuition for the various courses often seems excessive. The State 
Normal and Industrial School is located in a school town ; living ex- 
penses are reasonable ; there is no tuition ; the courses are thorough, 
practical and comprehensive. 

Business Course. 

Bookkeeping Business Forms 

Business Arithmetic Penmanship 

Spelling Correspondence 

Commercial Law Mimeographing 

Commercial Geography Rapid Calculation 

Course LXXXII. Spelling (1 hr. per day, 3 terms). 

Spelling is made one of the important subjects. Work is given in 
both written and oral spelling. The class is carefully drilled in pro- 
nunciation and in the marking and defining of words. A text-book is 
used. 

Course LXXXIII. Penmanship (1 hr. per day, 3 terms). 

Students are taught the plain, rapid and legible style of penman- 
ship which the business world demands. Instruction is given regarding 
position of body, hand, pen, paper, movements and best letter forms. 

Course LXXIV. Bookkeeping (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

The forms used in this course are those of the largest, best known 
and most progressive business firms in our cities. The student begins 
with double entry, learning to journalize, post, take a trial balance, 
close the ledger and make a balance sheet and statement of the personal 
accounts. He then begins with single entry, learns to change the books 
from double to single entry and vice versa, and becomes familiar with 
the day book, journal, cash book and special ruled journals and cash 
books. He is trained in the use of partnership sets, special ruled books, 
bill books, invoice books, sales books, retailing, wholesaling, and during 
the latter part of the course the time is devoted to the lumber business, 



62 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

banking and the building and loan business. Careful instruction is 
given in writing commercial papers and business forms. 

Course LXXXV. Commercial Arithmetic (1 hr. per day, 3 
terms). 

A thorough review of the entire subject with special reference to 
the needs of accountants. Fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, 
percentage, interest, partial payments, stocks, insurance, etc., are re- 
viewed and business methods and rapid calculation given special at- 
tention. 

Course LXXXVI. Commercial Geography (1 hr. per day, iy 2 
terms). 

The instruction in commercial geography covers the natural and 
industrial resources of all important countries, the routes and means 
of communication, imports and exports, the consular service, etc. 

Course LXXXVII. Commercial Law (1 hr. per day, iy 2 terms). 

The student is taught that every person is amenable to the law 
and entitled to its protection, and that he should have a reasonable 
knowledge of it in so far as it may apply to contracts, agencies, partner- 
ships, sale of goods, bailments, negotiable instruments, interest, usury, 
transportation, guarantee, surety, corporations, joint stock companies, 
insurance, real estate, etc., and a wholesome regard for its enforcement. 



STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING. 

Course LXXXIX. Shorthand (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

Students desiring to pursue this subject should enroll at the be- 
ginning of the school year. This course embraces a thorough drill in 
combining the signs into words, phrases and sentences, drills for speed, 
practice in transcribing notes, class and office dictation, and in the 
training necessary for the amanuensis and reporter. The Pitman sys- 
tem of shorthand is taught together with such improvements as have 
stood the test of the most severe requirements of the reporter's art. 
The debating clubs, chapel exercises and the routine of the county 
court, when in session, furnish excellent opportunity for practice. A 
phonograph is used for advanced dictation. 

Course XC. Typewriting (2 hrs. per day, 3 terms). 

"Touch" typewriting: That is, the student doeb not depend on 
watching a lettered keyboard, but operates the machine perfectly, be- 
cause he has a thorough knowledge of the position of every key, thereby 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 63 

gaining speed and accuracy and lessening the strain upon himself. He 
is required to become proficient in transcribing his shorthand notes, in 
copying, stenciling, and must be able to take dictation from the teacher 
or from the phonograph. When competent, he has actual business 
practice. The president's office, the /aculrv and the different organiz- 
ations of the school supply this depaiLnient with different kinds of 
work. 



MILITARY .JIENCE 

By an Act of the Legislature the State Normal-Industrial School 
is required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military 
Science and the company organized and drilled is subject to regular 
inspection by the Adjutant General of the State. In harmony with 
this provision young men are drilled regularly in the schools of the sol- 
dier, squad, platoon, company, battalion and the ceremonies. 

( 1 ) Organization. The cadet battalion at present comprises, 
with the commandant, one cadet captain, one cadet first lieutenant, 
one cadet second lieutenant, five sergeants, one color sergeant, six 
corporals, and one artificer and cadets. A single permanent company 
is maintained under the name of Company A. 

(2) Equipment. The State Normal and Industrial School is sup- 
plied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutrements; a Winchester 
rifle for long range practice, Winder target rifles ; a large Atkins disap- 
pearing target; United States regulation rapiers, for fencing; sabers 
and belts for cadet officers; silk battalion flag, United States regulation 
ammunition, consisting of cartridges for target practice, and blank 
cartridges for use in volley firing and skirmish drill. Captain Ritchie, 
who inspected the cadets in 191 3, has recommended, to the Adjutant 
General, that modern arms and equipment be issued to this school. 

(3) Appointments and promotions. The officers and non- 
commissioned officers are selected from among those cadets who have 
been most studious, soldier-like and faithful in the performance of then- 
duties and who have been most exemplary in their deportment. The 
commandant and the commissioned officers constitute the board of 
examiners for the appointment and promotion of privates and non- 
commissioned officers. 

(4) Military diploma. Commissions and warrants are issued 
to the commissioned officers who are duly examined and deemed worthy 
of promotion, provided, however, that they have drilled at least one 
term as officers, have been promoted to higher rank, have received an 



64 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

average of not less than 70 per cent, and have participated in at least 
one annual military contest. 

(5) Uniform. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn by all 
cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in courses re- 
quiring attendance for more than a single term. This uniform consists 
of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray color, modeled after the United 
States Military Academy uniform, and is made in two qualities costing, 
respectively, $10.85 ana " $12.85. The uniform is tailor made, of strong 
material, and is as neat, durable and economical a suit as the student 
can obtain for this amount. It may be purchased at the school, at 
actual cost, or elsewhere, as the student elects. Uniforms and gloves 
are worn at all regular drills and inspections. 

(6) Attendance. Six terms of military drill are required of 
all boys, unless excused on account of physical disability. A physician's 
certificate must accompany such excuse. The standing of each cadet is 
averaged at the close of each term. The chief items considered in 
determining the grade are attendance, deportment and drill. Only 
those cadets whose average is above 70 per cent for the six terms will 
be exempt from attendance. 

(7) Annual military contest and prizes. An annual mili- 
tary contest is held at the close of the Winter Term. There are four 
events : Company Drill and Inspection ; Officers' Saber Drill ; Squad 
Drill ; Individual Contest Drill. For each drill at the annual military 
contest there are three judges selected by the President and Command- 
ant. The squad receiving the highest percentage in contest drill is 
presented with a silk ribbon, suitably inscribed, which is attached to the 
battalion colors, and the members of the squad receive honorable men- 
tion in the catalogue. The prize for the best drilled man in the in- 
dividual contest is a silver medal, for the second best drilled cadet a 
bronze medal, and each receives honorable mention. The individual 
contest is open to all members of the battalion. All cadets who take 
part in the annual military contest must appear in full regulation 
uniform. 

In the contest of 191 3 Corporal Silas McCulloch won the silver 
medal, Cadet Mauriel Dunton, the bronze medal. The squad winning 
first honors in the squad contest was composed of First Sergeant Jay 
Harm (commanding), Corporals William Gamble and Richard Gam- 
ble ; cadets Emmet McGraw, Leonard McMartin, Vern Crary, 
Charles Shimmin, Everett Thrams and Ernest Wood. 

Mr. Linvill Townsend has been elected Cadet Captain for the 
year iq^-'H- 




fc-H 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 65 

Course XCI. Military Science. 

Two periods per week for six terms; 6 points credit. 

Theoretical and practical instruction in infantry regulations; man- 
ual of arms ; school of the company and squad drill ; bayonet exercises ; 
saber drill; guard duty; small arm firing; battalion parade; reviews, 
etc. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

The primary purpose of the State Normal and Industrial School is 
the harmonious development of the entire boy or girl. Athletics and 
sports have a place in the development of every normal person and re- 
ceive proper encouragement and supervision. Physical training is com- 
pulsory; two periods per week for six terms. Each student, before 
entering the gymnasium, is given a physical examination. The condi- 
tion of heart, lungs, digestion, nervous and muscular system, carriage, 
etc., is noted and indicated on a chart. This enables the instructor to 
prescribe special exercises for individual needs. Each student must 
provide himself with a light gymnasium suit of prescribed pattern. 
There is a fee of fifty cents a year. 

Course XCII. Physical Training. 

(a) For young men. Two periods per week of six terms; 6 
points credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnastics, both 
with and without apparatus; free-hand exercises; sports. Football, 
basketball, baseball and tennis are available in season. 

(b) For young women. Two periods per week for six terms; 6 
points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises are 
similar to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bell and barbell training, 
club swinging, marching, running, exercises with light apparatus, etc. 
Basketball is given a fair share of the time. 

Course XCIII. Essentials of Physical Training. 

Especially designed for students expecting to teach, and coach, 
athletics. Anatomy, physiology and hygiene will be taken up so as 
to give the student a practical working basis for the course and show 
the necessity and benefits of physical training. The fundamental 
principles of the different branches of athletics will be considered; se- 



66 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

lection, training and conditioning of athletes; problems of temperament, 
climate, weather and traveling. Lectures, charts, demonstrations and 
note-book work. Three periods per week throughout the year. Given 
by Mr. Swetland. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 67 



Roster of Students 



SENIOR CLASS 
NORMAL-MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 

Edwin M. Canfield Fullerton 

Thomas McDonald Ellendale 

NORMAL-HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

Ida H. Baumbach Ellendale 

Lelah E. Coleman Ellendale 

Ruth C. Leiby Ellendale 

Cecile A. McPherson Silverleaf 

NORMAL COURSE 

Viola E. Boyd Ellendale 

Elga O. Carlson Wetonka, S. D. 

Cressy M. Deane LaMoure 

Tracy B. Fleming Monango 

Lilian A. Harm Ellendale 

May Kaven Linton 

N. Belle Morey Fullerton 

Leona I. Newton Monango 

Mamie B. Wilson Ellendale 

Pearl M. Zimmerman Noonan 

MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 

Clellan W. Bentley Ellendale 

Howard C. Holte Ellendale 

A. C. Malin Kulm 

Lloyd E. Myers Red Oak, Iowa 

MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 

Joseph C. Bentley Ellendale 

HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 
Ruth M. Haas Ellendale 

Anna Marie Kellogg Ellendale 

Gertrude E. Merklein Wausau, Wis. 

Opal E. Montague Bellaire, Mich. 

Blanche N. Saunders Forbes 



68 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

COMMERCIAL ARTS COURSE 

Lucy A. Bowler ellendale 

Linvill Townsend Ellendale 

Lyall Avery Willis Rhame 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 

Joseph Boyd Ellendale 

Bernice E. Dada Cayuga 

Ibma B. Shepard Ellendale 

James C. Vandanacker Ellendale 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Anderson, Eva, Normal Fullerton 

Applequist, Boone, Normal Ellendale 

Barnes, Bertha, H. E. Ellendale 

Baumbach, Tillie Normal Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clara, H. E. Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clarence, M. A. Ellendale 

Boom, Frances, C. A. Ellendale 

Boyce, Martha, H. E. Fargo 

Bredberg, Cornell, C. P. Linton 

Brown, Daisy, H. E. Ellendale 

Campbell, Bessie, Normal Ellendale 

Carr, Charlotte Pearl, H. E. Sheldon 

Case, Mary, Normal Ellendale 

Conner, Irma, Normal Rhame 

Crabtree, Mildred, Normal Ellendale 

Dada, Nina, C. P. Cayuga 

Dawe, John, C. P. Fullerton 

De La Hunt, Walter, M. A. Willmar, Minn. 

Dobler, Augustina, Normal Kulm 

Gish, Grace, C. A. Ellendale 

Guldborg, Mary, Normal Ellendale 

Halsted, Charles, M. A. Forbes 

Halsted, Oliver, M. A. Forbes 

Harm, Pearl, Normal . Ellendale 

Higgs, Vera, H. E. Ellendale 

Holte, Maude, H. E. Ellendale 

Howard, Nellie, Normal Ellendale 

Hutsinpiller, Dorothy, Normal Oakes 

Kalbus, Martha, Normal Ellendale 

Koppang, Thoralf, Normal Edmore 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 69 

Kosel, John, M. A. Ellendale 

Lawhead, Arthur, C. P. Taylor 

Lyons, Mabel, Normal Altona, Mich. 

McCormick Clyde, Nor. M. A. Soldiers' Grove, Wis. 

McCulloch, Silas, M. A. Edgeley 

McGinnis, Lilian, H. E. Silverleaf 

McMartin, Esther, H. E. Ellendale 

Merchant, Edith, H. E. Ellendale 

Pollock, Kittie, Normal Ellendale 

Porter, Hector, N. D. Ellendale 

Porter, Preston, C. P. Ellendale 

Potter, Laura, Ind. Ellendale 

Potter, Robert, C. A. Ellendale 

Randall, Hazel, C. P. Ellendale 

Randall, Laura, Normal Ludden 

Saunders, Ethel, Normal Forbes 

Senn, Lester, M. A. Frederick, S. D. 

Stafsberg, Clara, Normal Ellendale 

Stafsberg, Edna, Normal Ellendale 

Stafsberg, Mabel, Normal Ellendale 

Stahl, Charles, Normal Ellendale 

Teichmann, Neva, Normal H. E. Fullerton 

Upham, Maggie, H. E. Drayton 

Wagner, Winnie, Normal Guelph 

Walker, Frances, Normal Ellendale 

Walton, Frances, C. P. Ellendale 

Webb, Irene, H. E. Ellendale 

Wyckoff, Marguerite, Normal Monango 

Zimmermann, Benetta, Ind. . Noonan 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Abraham, Francis, M. A. Ellendale 

Ackerman, Fred, C. A. Ashley 

Avery, Effie, Normal Forbes 

Barnes, Belva, H. E. Ellendale 

Becker, Willard, Normal Russell 

Bjornstad, Mildred, H. E. Ellendale 

Brauer, Gottlieb, C. A. Odessa, Wash. 

Brooks, Leo. C. A. , Cogswell 

Brown, Floyd, C. A. Ellendale 

Burkhardt, Mary, Normal Guelph 

Callan, Frank, M. A. Ellendale 

Carpenter, Joseph, C. A. Cogswell 



70 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Colwell, Mabel, Normal Ellendale 

Colwell, Robin, M. A. Ellendale 

Dale, Helen, Normal White Bear, Minn. 

Deane, Dorothy, Normal Ellendale 

Deane, Robert, C. P. Ellendale 

Dethlefson, Julia, C. A. Oakes 

Duffy, Edward, M. A. Clones, Ireland 

Dunton, Muriel, M. A. Ellendale 

Eichinger, Sceone, Normal Brussels, Wis. 

Etherington, Hattie, H. E. Mandan 

Everson, Mabel, Normal Washburn 

Feltis, Frances, C. A. Verona 

Fleming, Stanley, M. A. Ellendale 

Gackle, Martin, C. P. Kulm 

Gamble, Richard, M. A. Ellendale 

Gamble, William, C. A. Ellendale 

Geer, Clayton, M. A. _ Ellendale 

Godfrey, Robert, M. A. Russell 

Hall, Faye, H. E. Monango 

Hall, Nellie, H. E. Monango 

Harm, Jay, M. A. Ellendale 

Hatfield, Edna, Normal Fullerton 

Hermanson, Lena, C. A. Ellendale 

Hill, Hervey, M. A. Ellendale 

Hill, Myrtle, H. E. Ellendale 

Hollan, Emma, Normal Kulm 

Joyner, Audrey, H. E. Ellendale 

Johnson, William, M. A. Ellendale 

Kalbus, Elsie, Normal Ellendale 

Kalbus, Fred, C. A. Ellendale 

Keagle, Betrice, H. E. Ellendale 

Kellogg, Joycelyn, C. P. Ellendale 

Knox, Bertha, H. E. Monango 

Laughlin, Lola, Normal Monango 

Lee, Arthur, M. A. Cayuga 

Lee, Thos., C. A. Cayuga 

Leverty, Agnes, Normal Ellendale 

Lockwood, Howard, M. A. Ellendale 

Lynde, Llewellyn, M. A. Ellendale 

Lynde, Orrin, M. A. Ellendale 

Mattson, Jacob, C. A. Frederick, S. D. 

McCormick, Don, C. A Soldiers' Grove, Wis. 

McCulloch, William, M. A. Edgeley 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 71 

McGinnis, Hazel, Normal Silverleaf 

McGraw, Emmet,, M. A. Cogswell 

McMaster, Hazel, H. E. Forbes 

Meachen, Leonard, C. P. Ellendale 

Misfeldt, Douglas, C. A. Ellendale 

Mock, Maud, H. E. Ellendale 

Moore, Verl, M. A. Forbes 

Nelson, Lottie, C. A. Fullerton 

Nichols, Harry, M. A. Oakes 

Noess, Lulu, Normal Ellendale 

Payton, Nile, M. A. Oakes 

Peek, Charles, M. A. Ellendale 

Peterson, Ada, Normal Rutland 

Pfaff, Gladys, C. A. Underwood 

Pierce, Raymond, Normal Ellendale 

Rehberg, Paul, M. A. Ellendale 

Rodine, Edna, Normal Oakes 

Rosenthal, Arthur, C. A. Ellendale 

Rost, Ellen, Normal Kulm 

Rost, May, Normal Kulm 

Saunders, Maurice, M. A. Ellendale 

Saunders, Walter, M. A. Forbes 

Schaller, Elizabth, Normal Ellendale 

Schnell, Harry, C. P. Edgeley 

Schon, Julia, Ind. Ellendale 

Schon, Kathryn, Ind. Ellendale 

Schrader, Vera, Normal Ludden 

Shoemaker, James, M. A. Wyoming, Penna. 

Smith, Dorothy, C. P. Ellendale 

Snow, Chancy, C. A. Oakes 

Soderquist, Vernie, M. A. Columbus 

Spencer, Marcus, M. A. Ellendale 

St. Ores, Alita, Normal Ellendale 

Steele, Mildred, H. E. Berlin 

Stende, Rosenna, C. A. Silverleaf 

Strand, Mabel, Normal Ellendale 

Strutz, Arthur, M. A. Oakes 

Sullivan, Olive, Normal Ellendale 

Thompson, Fred, C. A. Fairdale 

Thrams, Everett, C. A. Bismarck 

Thue, Christian, M. A. Horace 

Turnham, Frances, Normal Ludden 

Tye, Kay, C. A. Hazelton 



72 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Wagner, Ruth, Normal Guelph 

Walker, Robert, M. A. Ellendale 

Walton, Winnifred, C. A. Oakes 

Ward, H. V., C. P. Ellendale 

Wattula, Hillia, Normal Ludden 

Weist, Emil, C. A. Ellendale 

Welcher, Eber, C. P. Ellendale 

Wilson, Helen, Normal Monango 

Wilson, Mamie, H. E. Ipswich, S. D. 

Withee, Hazel, Normal Guelph 

Wood, Ernest, C. P. Forbes 

Young, Mabel, Normal Ellendale 

Zieman, Gertrude, Ind. Oakes 

Zieman, Harold, M. A. Oakes 

Zinter, Anna, H. E. Ellendale 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Arndt, Helga, H. E. Fullerton 

Backman, Alfred, M. A. Frederick, S. D. 

Backman, Ebba, C. A. Wilton 

Bohling, Sarah, H. E. Ellendale 

Casson, Mitchell, M. A. Linton 

Cook, Angeline, Normal Ellendale 

Crary, Vern, Prep. Ellendale 

Dickhoff, Gotthilf, Prep. Kulm 

Doering, Bertha, Normal Danzig 

Ehlers, Elva, R. T. Hettinger 

Ehlers, Gladys, R. T. Hettinger 

Evans, Martha, H. E. Ellendale 

Fawcett, Ethel, Normal Ellendale 

Ferree, Myrtle, H. E. Ellendale 

Gelling, Gertrude, R. T. Frederick, S. D. 

Gish, Wayne, Prep. Ellendale 

Haring, Jay, C. A. __Cayuga 

Hatfield, Jane, R. T. __^__ Fullerton 

Hille, Emily, Prep. Kulm 

Hyatt, Ethel, R. T. Ludden 

Isaak, Nathaniel, Prep. Kulm 

Kast, Katherine, Prep. Fullerton 

Kellogg, Paul, M. A. Ellendale 

King, Claude, Prep. Ellendale 

Kingsford, Harold, Prep. Ellendale 

Lucke, Richard, Prep. Fullerton 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 73 

McEntee, Ina, R. T. Ellendale 

McMartin, Leonard M. A. Ellendale 

Mock, Floyd, Prep. Forbes 

Nathan, Theodore, C. A. Ellendale 

Ogren, Betty, H. E. Kulm 

Pederson, Fritz, Prep. Oakes 

Porter, Jacob, Prep. Ellendale 

Rosenthal, Lawrence, Prep. Ellendale 

Sauer, Edwin, Prep. H a zelton 

Saunders, Rex, Prep. Ellendale 

Schulte, William, M. A. Newark, S. D. 

Shimmin, Charles, M. A. Forbes 

Wattles, Harry, Prep. Ellendale 

Walz, Fred, M. A. Ashley 

White,, Bernice, R. T. Ashley 

Wittula, Lilian, Ind. Hecla, S. D. 

Williams, Lewis, Prep. Ellendale 

Wilson, Vernie, R. T. Ellendale 

Ziegenhagel, David, Prep. Lehr 

Zieman, Gladys, Ind. Oakes 

SHORT COURSE. 

Anderson, Hjalmer, C. A. Glover 

Applequist, James, F. E. Ellendale 

Barsten, Adolph, F. E. Fullerton 

Barsten, Mamie, H. E. Fullerton 

Baxter, J. B., C. A. Braddock 

Bethke, Clara, H. E. Edgeley 

Billey, Leino, F. E. Ellendale 

Bjelde, Andrew, F. E. Frederick, S. D. 

Blumer, Herman, F. E. Fullerton 

Blumer, Johz, F. E. Fullerton 

Bovre, Hannah, H. E. Strum, Wis. 

Brown, Walter, F. E. Underwood 

Carlson, Charles, F. E. Jud 

Carow, Emma, H. E. Edgeley 

Chesebro, Laken, F. E. Ellendale 

Cook, Jerrold, F. E. Monango 

Cooper, Lance, F. E. Newark, S. D. 

Coyle, George, F. E. Elkwood 

Crary, Charles, F. E. Ellendale 

Crowder, Grace,, H. E. Ross 

Erickson, Emelia, H. E. Rutland 



74 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Gallagher, Harry, F. E. Oakes 

Glenz, Dora, H. E. Ross 

Goltz, Eugene, F. E. Havana 

Goodman, Allie, H. E. Dawson 

Gradin, Eldred, F. E. Underwood 

Gradin, Mabel, H. E. Underwood 

Grochow, Reinhold, F. E. Underwood 

Hamre, Malfred, F. E. Leonard 

Hamre, Manvil, F. E. Leonard 

Hansen, Edward, F. E. Cogswell 

Harris, Charles,, F. E. Drake 

Hastad, Louis, F. E. Edmore 

Hatfield, Oscar, F. E. Ellendale 

Heine, Albert, F. E. Ellendale 

Heine, Carl, F. E. -Ellendale 

Jones, Joseph, F. E. Oakes 

Johnson, Ebba, H. E. Kulm 

Kalbus, Alfred, F. E. Ellendale 

Knox, George, F. E. Monango 

Krause, Robert, F. E. Ellendale 

Kunrath, John, F. E. Oakes 

Lind, Linnie, H. E. Turtle Lake 

Mailloux, Edgar, F. E. Earl Park, Ind. 

Martin, Grandon, F. E. Ellendale 

Meiers, Violet, H. E. Ross 

Merkel, Edward, F. E. LaMoure 

Naatus, Benjamin, F. E. . Hecla, S. D. 

Noess, Herman, F. E. Ellendale 

Noess, William, F. E. Ellendale 

Reamann, Harry, F. E. Braddock 

Rosberg, Mamie, H. E. Underwood 

Rose, Ralph, F. E. Ellendale 

Rowe, Peter, F. E. Ellendale 

Sadler, Walter, F. E. Havana 

Sanger, Floyd, F. E. Monango 

Schott, John, F. E. Braddock 

Schook, Bada, H. E. Ellendale 

Swanson, Albert, F. E. Oakes 

Taylor, Junior, F. E. Newark, S. D. 

Thorson, Kenneth, F. E. Ortley, S. D. 

Vix, Reinhold, F. E. Monango 

Waite, Francis, F. E. Guelph 

Waite, Wilford, F. E. Gueiph 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 75 

Wheelock, Caroline, H. E. Ross 

Wittula, Allen, F. E. Hecla, S. D. 

Wittula, Willie, F. E. Hecla, S. D. 

Williams, Melvin, C. A. Ellendale 

Wortman, Clyde, F. E. Havana 

Ylitala, Elmer, F. E. Savo, S. D. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Barnes, Barbara, C. A. Ellendale 

Barnes, Howard, C. A. Ellendale 

Blumer, Matilda, H. E. Ellendale 

Crabtree, Ben, C. A Ellendale 

Dunton, Imogene, F. A. Ellendale 

Earnest, Lena, H. E. Kalispel, Mont. 

Earnest, Nellie, H. E. Kalispel, Mont. 

Flemington, Adah, C. A. Ellendale 

Harvey, Dorothy, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Higgs, Mayme, H. E. Ellendale 

King, Mrs. R. S., H. E. Ellendale 

Rasmussen, Myrtle, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Stafsberg, Alma, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Wenzel, Helen, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Williams, Estella, Post.-Grad. Ellendale 

Williams, Beulah, Inst. Music Ellendale 

Wilson, Hazel, C. A. Ellendale 

Summary 

Senior Class 34 

Junior Class 59 

Sophomore Class 113 

Freshman Class 46 

Short Course Students 70 

Special Students 17 

Grand Total 339 



t 



North Dakota 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 

Ellendale, North Dakota 




Catalog Number 



June, 1914 



«;nivbbs»tv of iLUNOis 

OCT 23 1914 




^ 
o 

^ 



C3S 



cc 






C3i 



CATALOG NUMBER 



North Dakota State Normal 
and Industrial School 




^ 



m 



* 



JUNE 1914 
Vol.9 No. 3 



Published Quarterly by the 
STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
Ellendale, North Dakota 

Entered August 8, 1907, at Eliecdaie, I\o. Dak., under the Act of Ccngrebs of July 16, 1904. 



Calendar 

1914 
Fall Term, Thirteen Weeks 

Registration, Monday, September 21, and Tuesday, September 22 
Class Work Begins, Wednesday, September 23 

Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., and Faculty Reception, 

Saturday Evening, September 26 
Thanksgiving Recess Begins, Wednesday Evening, November 25 
Class Work Resumes, Tuesday, December 1 

Fall Term Ends, Friday Evening, December 18 

1915 
Winter Term, Eleven Weeks 
Registration, Monday, January 4, and Tuesday, January 5 

Class Work Begins, Wednesday, January 6 

Reception to Short Course Students, Saturday Evening, January 9 
Annual Military Contest, Thursday, March 18 

Cadet Reception and Banquet, Friday, March 19 

Winter Term Ends Friday Evening, March 19 

Spring Term, Twelve Weeks 
Registration, Monday, March 22 

Class Work Begins, Tuesday, March 25 

Class Contests, Saturday Afternoon, May 1 

Junior-Senior Reception, Saturday, June 5 

Baccalaureate Address, Sunday, June 6 

Annual Oratorical and Declamatory Contest, Monday, June 7 

Annual School Concert, Tuesday, June 8 

Senior Class Play, Wednesday, June 9 

Commencement, 10:30 a. m., Thursday, June 10 

President's Reception, Thursday, June 10 

Alumni Reception, Friday, June 11 

Summer Term, Six Weeks 

Registration, Monday, June 14 

W^ork Begins, Tuesday, June 15 

Summer Term Ends, Friday Evening, July 2^ 



7 am among you as he that serveth. 



Hoard of Trustees 



Hon. Chester R. Hodge, President, Jamestown 
Hon. Richard McCarten, Cogswell 
Hon. H. H. Perry, Ellendale 
Hon. F. S. Goddard, Ellendale 
Hon. D. E. Geer, Ellendale 



Faculty 1913-14 



WILLIS E. JOHNSON.* State Normal School, St. Cloud, Minne- 
sota; Student, Carleton College; Ph. B. and M. A., Illinois 
Wesleyan University; Postgraduate Student, University of 
Chicago; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

President 

A. E. DUNPHY. Eau Claire, Wis., School of Mechanic Arts; 
Special Student Wisconsin University, 1907 ; Teacher of Me- 
chanic Arts, Eau Claire, 1895-8; Waukesha Industrial School, 
1898-9; Special Student Industrial Schools of Munich, 1914; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1899. Acting President 
1911-12. 

Director of Mechanic Arts 

E. W. ACKERT. Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899 ; 
B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901 ; A. B., Drake University, 1907; 
Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1907. 

Mathematics 

W. G. BOWERS. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1905 ; A. M., Indiana State University, 
1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1903-5; Principal of Schools, Leesburg, O., 1905-6; 
Instructor in Science, Indiana Normal, 1906-7; State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1907. 

Physical Science 

CARRIE TUTTLE. A. B., Wittenberg College ; Student in Library 
Economy, Chicago University. State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1907. 

Librarian 



GABRIELLA C. BRENDEMUHL. A. B, Carleton College, 1905 ; 
Teacher of German and Preceptress, Rochester Academy, 
1905-08; High School Principal, 1908-10; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1910. 

German 

*See following pages for an announcement concerning Pres- 
ident-elect R. M. Black and the faculty for 1914-15. 



ROSE W. EATON. B. L. University of Minnesota; Phi Beta 
Kappa ; Instructor Minnesota High Schools, ten years ; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 191 1. 

Latin . 

JACOB SCHUTZ. Graduate Royal Conservatory of Christiania, 
Norway, piano and voice; A. B., University of Christiania, 
1897 ; Ph. B. University of Christiania, 1900; Director of Music, 
Grand River College, Gallatin, Mo., 190x6-09 ; Director of Music, 
Tuscaloosa Conservatory of Music, Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1909-11. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 191 1. 

Piano 

Voice 

W. C. HUTTON. Graduate Lewis Institute 1906; Special student 
at Art Institute 1906 ; Special student at University of Chicago, 
1907. Supervisor of Manual Training, Lake Geneva, Wis., 
Public Schools, 1908-12. State Normal and Industrial School, 
191 2. Acting Director of Mechanic Arts, Spring Term, 1914. 

Wood Work 

Forge Shop 

Wood Work 

Cabinet Making 

R. S. KING. M. E., Ohio State University; M. S., University of 
Minnesota. State Normal and Industrial School, 1912. 

Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 



J. E. SWETLAND. A. B., Ripon College. All Wisconsin fullback 
(football) four seasons; All Wisconsin guard (basketball). 
Holds college records in hurdles, shot, discus and hammer; In- 
structor and coach Grand Rapids and Eau Claire High School, 
1910-12; State Normal and Industrial School, 1912. 

Athletic Director 
Military Science 

ALICE MADELINE GUNN. B. S., Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1901 ; post-graduate work, 1902-3 ; Director of Domestic 
Science Department and Home Economics Department, Iron 
Mountain, Michigan, 1903-06; Illinois Woman's College, Jack- 
sonville, 111., 1906-08; Director of Domestic Science and Art, 
State Normal School, Superior, Wis., 1908-12. State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1913. 

Director of Home Economics Dept. 

BEATRICE OLSON. B. A., University of North Dakota; Emer- 
son College of Oratory, Boston. Principal of High School, 
Rugby, N. D. ; Instructor English and Public Speaking, Fargo, 
N. D. State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Head of English Department 
Public Speaking 

OLIN E. COMBELLICK. Graduate of Normal Department, Da- 
kota University; B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, 1907-1913; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1913. 

Director of Normal Department 

IDA N. CHAMBERS. Graduate of Frances Shimer School of 
University of Chicago, Mt. Carroll ; graduate of Art Institute, 
Chicago; Supervisor of Drawing, St. Cloud, Minnesota, 191 1- 
1913; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. (Resigned 
December 19, 1913.) 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 



FLOYD C. HATHAWAY. B. S., South Dakota State College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts; student Parker College; stu- 
dent Minnesota School of Agriculture; graduate student Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin ; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Agriculture 

IDA LEONE BROOKS. A. B., University of Minnesota; under- 
graduate student, University of Southern California; post-grad- 
uate student, Simmons College, Boston ; President Students' 
Government Association, University of Minnesota Dormitory. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Preceptress 
Domestic Science 

R. F. PALMER. A. B., Harvard College ; Graduate of Metropolitan 
Business College ; commercial instructor in high schools and 
colleges, 1 907-191 1; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Director Commercial Department 

JACOB GRUENIG. Graduate of Bryant and Stratton's Business 
College; student Southern Illinois Normal University; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

History 

GERTRUDE GIBBENS. B. S., North Dakota Agricultural Col- 
lege. State Normal and Industrial School, 19 13. 
Domestic Art 

LEROY CRAWFORD. Student in Commercial Department, 
Northern Normal and Industrial School, Aberdeen, S. D. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Registrar 

JENNIE J. HARNSBERGER. Graduate Wisconsin State Normal 
School ; Teachers' Course, Art Institute, Chicago ; Crafts- 
Handicraft Guild, Minneapolis. Supervisor of Drawing, Albert 
Lea, Minnesota, 1906-12. Art student, Chicago, 1912-13. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 



MOLLIE G MERKLEIN. Graduate of the Milwaukee Normal 
School, Kindergarten Department; Wausau Kindergarten Train- 
ing School. State Normal and Industrial School, 191 3. 

Primary Critic 

FRANCES WALKER. Student, State Normal and Industrial 

School. 

Assistant in Music Department 

ARTHUR LAWHEAD. Student, State Normal and Industrial 
School. 

Assistant in Commercial Department 

PRESTON H. PORTER. Student, State Normal and Industrial 

School. 

Assistant in Physical Science 

LILLIAN GRACE McGINNIS. Student, State Normal and In- 
dustrial School. 

Assistant in Domestic Science 

WALTER SMITH. Student, State Normal and Industrial School. 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts 




3 

o 
a 



«1 






Faculty, 1914-15 



The faculty for 19 14- 15 will remain unchanged with but few 
exceptions. President Willis E. Johnson resigns to accept the pres- 
idency of the Northern Normal and Industrial School at Aberdeen, 
South Dakota. In his stead the Board of Trustees has chosen Pro- 
fessor R. M. Black, whose splendid career for nearly a score of years 
in North Dakota as city superintendent, county superintendent, and 
professor of civics and political science at the State School of 
Science constitutes a sufficient guarantee of his ability. 

R. M. BLACK. A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895 ; A. M., 
1910; Graduate student, University of Chicago; Professor in Red 
River Valley University, 1895-7, 1899-1903; Superintendent of 
Wahpeton City Schools, 1903-5, County Superintendent of Richland 
County, 1905-9; Professor of History and Political Science, State. 
School of Science, 1909-14; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1914. 

President 

Professor Jacob Schutz resigns to accept a more attractive posi- 
tion and Miss Frances Walker, his able assistant, also leaves for a 
more lucrative position. Hereafter the work will be divided, the 
work in piano being in charge of Miss Jessie Howell, who was a 
student at St. Mary's Hall, Faribault, Minnesota ; piano teacher at 
the State Normal and Industrial School, 1909-11; a student at the 
Cosmopolitan School of Music and Dramatic Art, Chicago, special- 
izing in piano under Victor Heinze and in harmony under Helen 
Peacock; and spending 1911-12 in concert training in Berlin. 

The work in vocal music will be in charge of Miss Alpha Holte, 
who graduated from the State Normal and Industrial School in 1908 
and from the Columbia School of Music, Chicago, in 1910; was 
supervisor of music in the city schools of Montrose, Colorado, 19 10- 
191 3 ; was teacher of voice in Western Slope Conservatory of Music, 
Montrose, 1910-12; studied harmony under Rossitter Cole and took 
special coaching in the Garst Vocal Studies in Voice Building and 
Interpretation, 1913-14. 



General Information 



PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE SCHOOL 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was es- 
tablished by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with a 
section of the state constitution providing for its creation. The 
revised law of 1907 relating to this school reads as follows : 

"That the institution located at Ellendale, Dickey County, North 
Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial School, the 
object of such school being to provide instruction in a comprehen- 
sive way in wood and iron work and the various other branches of 
domestic economy as a coordinate branch of education, together 
with mathematics, drawing and the other school studies and to pre- 
pare teachers in the science of education and the art of teaching in 
the public schools with special reference to manual training." 

It is believed that with this broad but well denned mission the 
Normal and Industrial School offers superior advantages to the 
young people of the state. Educational thought of the day is con- 
stantly emphasizing more and more the practical and everyday duties 
and problems of life along with the processes of formal culture. 
This school is well located and abundantly equipped to give this 
many sided and full preparation for complete life. 

A cordial invitation to visit the school is extended to all persons 
who may be interested in school work, and especially to those en- 
gaged in educational work. The school will welcome inquiries con- 
cerning teachers trained in its different departments. There is a 
demand for such teachers and public school officials will find that 
it is the purpose of the administration of the school to place its grad- 
uates so that they will serve the state with credit to themselves and 
the interests involved. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the State Normal and Industrial School con- 
sists of five main buildings, a foundry, a demonstration farm and an 
athletic field. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 1 1 

Dacotah hall. This is a thoroughly modern three story brick 
building and is an unusually attractive home for young women. The 
reception halls and society rooms are unusually pleasing. Here the 
young women of the school are surrounded by a stimulating and 
Christian influence. The purpose of the administration of the hall 
is to make it, not a boarding house, but a home, where every effort 
may be put forth to maintain the amenities of life, which prevail in 
homes of influence, refinement and good cheer. It is believed that the 
social life which the hall offers is one of the most valuable parts of 
the student's education while here. The building is arranged to 
accommodate nearly one hundred students, and is modern through- 
out, having a complete equipment of bathrooms, toilet rooms, steam 
heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are well lighted and 
well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by the students them- 
selves. Each young lady intending to reside at the hall should bring 
at least three sheets, three pillow cases, blankets, towels, soap and 
napkins. Preference in choice of rooms is given in order of applica- 
tion. The health and comfort of the students are the first consider- 
ation and all matters relating to food, hygiene and sanitation are 
carefully observed. 

Living expenses, including board, room, light, heat, and use of 
laundry and bath rooms, are $14.00 per month of four weeks. Table 
board is $3.00 per week. This rate is exceedingly low, when one 
considers the completeness of the service offered. The school does 
not aim to pay all the cost of operating the hall from these receipts. 
The table board is excellent and the building is finely equipped. 
Single meals and meals to guests are 20c each. Bills are payable one 
month in advance. No discount is made for absences of less than 
a week except in the case of the regular vacations, as indicated in 
the calendar. Students are required to take care of their own rooms. 
Mail is taken to the postoffice and delivered twice a day. 

Carnegie hall. This is a four story pressed brick structure, 
beautiful and commodious. In it are found the Normal Depart- 
ments, Departments of Science, English, Mathematics, Commercial 
Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the Library. In each de- 
partment the equipment is such that students may reap the most 
generous returns from their efforts. Physics, Chemistry, Biology 
and Physiography are taught in laboratories in the most approved 



12 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

manner; the Department of English has access to abundant liter- 
ature, the Commercial Department is provided with typewriters, 
duplicators, Edison dictation phonograph records, etc. ; the Depart- 
ment of Music owns eight high grade pianos and supplements these 
with rented instruments ; the Department of Fine Arts is equipped 
with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, lockers, 
kiln for burning china, etc. ; the library is generously provided with 
fiction, history, biography, scientific works, reference texts, etc., is 
equipped with a cabinet finding list and Poole's Index, and is grad- 
ually accumulating bound volumes of the standard magazines. 

Home economics building. A three story red brick building 
houses the Department of Domestic Science and Art. The depart- 
ment occupies the entire upper floor, and the lower floor in part, and 
is equipped with sewing machines, charts, lockers, tables, desks, 
cooking utensils, ranges, individual gas stoves and ovens. It also 
has the necessary demonstration table, dishes, silverware, linen, glass 
ware, etc., for a dining room. 

Mechanic arts building. This is two story red brick struc- 
ture 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The Departments of Mechanical 
Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the upper floor and are 
equipped with drafting benches, lathes, benches, individual and 
special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, tenoning machine, band saw, 
etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the De- 
partment of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is equipped 
with engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, hack saw, 
grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas engines is equipped 
with a thirty-five-horse-power Ideal engine, a twenty-horse-power 
horizontal side crank Howell engine, a twenty-horse-power auto- 
matic gasoline engine, a Case traction engine, a Gaar-Scott dis- 
mounted traction engine, an International portable gas engine, a 
four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine, a Gray Marine Motor, a 
six-horse-power Freeport gasoline engine, calorimeters, Crosby 
steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction brake, water 
meter, injector, pumps, traps, boiler attachments, etc. 

Armory. This is a two story red brick building. The first floor 
is occupied by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down- 









5l 


1 




' 


:^«11 


t 






4iJB!£i 






-. .-. . 






iSBSL 


wmX 


1 






I 




v .- JSMuX>~, 








4ijHSH 


> 






■ 


9BI 




K H 


1 


. <"^^j 













Normal and Industrial School Catalog 13 

draft forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor con- 
stitutes the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with 
dumb bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bars, traveling rings, spring 
board, vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physical 
training ; and with shower baths and lockers. 

Demonstration farm. Thirty acres, adjacent to the buildings, 
has been reserved for a demonstration farm. One section has been 
fenced for cultivation. Each of the demonstration strips averages 
one-tenth of an acre in area and has been carefully cultivated and 
valuable results have been obtained. 

Athletic field. The N-I Athletic Field is 288 ft. wide by 336 
ft. long, enclosed, and in it are found the base-ball diamond, foot-ball 
field, out-door basket-ball field, rifle range and grand stand. Here 
are held the out-of-door meets and the target practice of Company 
A. Three excellent tennis courts are maintained by a student- faculty 
tennis association. 

ADMISSION 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral character 
who has completed the common school course and received a di- 
ploma will be admitted without examination. A preparatory course 
is maintained for those students coming from schools not offering 
eighth grade work. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be 
admitted upon their credentials. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial depart- 
ments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice of parents 
and teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. This choice having 
been once made, no pupil will be permitted to change his course or 
to drop a subject except for the most important considerations and 
then only upon recommendation of the instructor and consent of 
the president. A student who voluntarily drops a subject without 
proper authority will be dropped from all classes until officially 
re-instated. 



14 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

CREDITS 

The unit of credit is a term's work in a subject, three units of 
credit constituting a year's work in a subject. No credit is given for 
less than a term's work. Credit for summer school work will not be 
given unless there are two daily recitations in the subject for six 
weeks. Credits are given in terms of percentage, 75 per cent being 
the passing grade excepting in spelling in which subject 90 per cent 
is the passing grade. 

The letter "I" is used to indicate that work in a subject is incom- 
plete and that a grade will be given when the required work is ac- 
complished during the same or succeeding school year. The letter 
"C" is used to indicate that the work is so nearly up to a passing 
grade that the student may continue the subject and when the work 
in the subject is satisfactorily completed a passing grade will be 
given for the term's work that was conditioned. The letter "F" is 
used to indicate failure. The student will be dropped from the class 
upon receiving this mark and must take the work over again to re- 
ceive credit. 

In subjects requiring little or only occasional outside study, as 
shop work, cooking, etc., two periods of laboratory or recitation 
work are required daily to receive full credit. 

Excepting in the ten and one-half months' and two year Normal 
courses no student doing first year's work is permitted to take more 
than five credit subjects. In a subsequent year's work special faculty 
permission must be obtained to take more than five credit subjects. 
To obtain such permission the student must have demonstrated ex- 
ceptional scholarship in previous work and must show study periods 
of one hour for each subject. 

GYMNASTICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied young 
men in Military Drill to conform to the state requirements as set 
forth in Chapter 167 of the Session Laws of 1909: 

"The State Normal and Industrial School is authorized and re- 
quired to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military Sci- 
ence, under such rules and regulations as the faculty of said institu- 
tion may prescribe." 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 15 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied students 
in gymnastics. In special cases and for good reasons students may 
be excused from military drill or gymnastics by vote of the faculty 
upon petition. 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

An eighth grade graduate may earn an elementary second grade 
certificate in one year and one summer session or an elementary first 
grade certificate in two years. 

The holder of a good second grade certificate may earn a first 
grade certificate (elementary) in one year or in two summer sessions. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in one year's work beyond a four-year high 
school course, is accredited as a second grade professional state cer- 
tificate for two years, and after nine months' successful experience 
in teaching, the holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade 
professional certificate valid for five years and renewable in the dis- 
cretion of the State Board of Education which provides the fore- 
going regulations. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a four-year high 
school course, is accredited as a second grade professional certificate 
for two years, and after nine months' successful experience in teach- 
ing, the holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade profes- 
sional certificate valid for life. 

Graduates from either the Mechanic Arts Course, Home Eco- 
nomics Course or Fine Arts Course are entitled to a State Life 
Certificate which entitles the holder to teach that special art in the 
schools of the state. 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this 
school are admitted to the following institutions with the standing 
indicated : 

(1) State university of north Dakota. The State Univer- 
sity of North Dakota admits graduates upon their credentials allow- 



1 6 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

ing full credit for courses completed and advanced standing as 

follows : 

"(i) Students who have graduated from a four-year high 
school course and who have also graduated from a one-year pro- 
fessional course in an accredited Normal School are allowed one 
year's credit (30 semester hours) on advanced standing. 

(2) Graduates from the two-year North Dakota Normal 
Schools and Normal Schools having equal standing, who are also 
graduates of first-class high schools, will be granted 60 units of 
advanced standing if they have completed all of the prescribed re- 
quirements for admission, and provided the subjects offered for 
advanced standing are in harmony with the group requirements for 
graduation. 

(3) Students who are not high school graduate but have 
completed the regular four-year or five-year normal course are given 
15 and 45 credits respectively on advanced standing, (including in 
either case 4 credits in Psychology and 12 in Education.)" 

(2) North Dakota agricultural cot t. foe. The North Da- 
kota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore year of its 
Agricultural and General Science Courses all graduates of this 
school. 

(3) Armour institute of technology. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trigonometry 
are admitted to Armour Institute without examination and receive 
three years' credit in shop work. 

(4) Michigan college of mines. Graduates of the Mechanic 
Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping are admitted without exam- 
ination. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are open 
to all students for competition : 

(1) Prize in oratory. The First National Bank of Ellendale 
offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in oratory 
under such rules as a committee of the faculty may prescribe. A 
second prize of ?5-00 in gold is given by J. H. Furan. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 17 

(2) Military prize. (First.) The State Normal and Indus- 
trial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins first place in 
individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, in 1914, by 
Emil Weist. 

(3) Military prize. (Second.) A bronze medal offered by 
the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet winning second 
honors in the individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, in 
1914, by Walter DeLaHunt. 

(4) Declamatory prtze. Mr. N. T. Holte offers a gold medal 
to the student who obtains first place in declamation under such rules 
as the faculty may prescribe. A second prize of $5.00 in gold is 
given by Dr. M. F. Merchant. 

(5) Original story prize. This prize, given by Mr. M. E« 
Randall, is a gold medal and is awarded to the student who prepares 
the best original short story. A second prize of five dollars in gold 
is given by Benjamin Porter. 

(6) Essay prize. Mr. B. Rosenthal offers $10.00 in cash to 
the young man who writes the best essay on "Why the Man Who 
Pays His Debts is Better off Financially Than the One Who Does 
Not." Mr. Rosenthal requires that the subject be brought out as a 
business proposition rather than a moral one as the latter is taken 
for granted. 

(7) Essay prize. Dr. M. F. Merchant offers $5.00 in cash to 
the student who writes the best essay on "The Cause of the Internal 
Troubles in Mexico." 

(8) Prize in domestic arts. L. S. Jones and Company offers 
$5.00 worth of merchandise, to be selected by the winner, to the 
young woman who does the best work in the making of a white 
waist. 

(9) Prize in mechanic arts. N. H. Bjornstad Hardware 
Company offers a four dollar pocket knife to the young man who 
exhibits the best workmanship on a piece of furniture, to be no less 
complicated than a table or chair. 

DISCIPLINE 
Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly conduct, 
and prompt obedience to lawful authority are imperative. Fortunate 



1 8 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

is the school in which the sentiment of the student body commends 
manly conduct. This is the type of discipline most desired at this 
school. In no sense is the State Normal-Industrial School a reform 
school and students who fail to yield a full and cheerful compliance 
to all requirements necessary for successful work and the honor of 
the school will be promptly dismissed. Discipline is educative when 
reasonable and intelligible. This is the guiding thought with which 
all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

The state of North Dakota makes a generous provision for the 
training of her young people at this school. No tuition fees are 
charged excepting as follows : A registration fee of fifty cents is 
collected of each student each term. A shop fee of fifty cents is 
required for each term's work in Mechanic Arts, Home Economics, 
Bookkeeping, Stenography or Typewriting. Special fees for private 
lessons in music are $12.00 for a term of twelve lessons. Piano rent 
is $1.00 per month. Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $3.50 per 
week payable, by the month, in advance. Good room and board may 
be had in private families at prices ranging from $4.00 per week up- 
wards. Many students rent rooms and board themselves. Board 
and room rent, the chief items of expense, range from $120 to $150 
per year of 36 weeks. 

The following deposit fees are required of those requiring the 
material, subject to return : Drawing set, $7.50; locker key, twenty- 
five cents; chemistry breakage, $1.00; sewing system, $3.00 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has been 
set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is open to all 
students until 4 130 o'clock school days. Arrangements are made by 
which students can draw books for use at times when the library is 
closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and cata- 
logued ; a cabinet card catalogue ; bound volumes of the leading mag- 
azines ; Poole's index ; congressional records, government reports 
and much other valuable material. New additions are constantly 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 19 

being made. Each department of the school has a well selected line 
of books for reference work. The leading magazines and news- 
papers are at the disposal of students. A trained librarian is in 
charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program, may, upon 
recommendation of the classification committee, arrange for special 
work. All such students, however, must satisfy the committee that 
their preparation is sufficient to bring them properly within the en- 
trance requirements. No student deemed deficient in the fundamen- 
tals will be permitted to elect the arts exclusively, but a fair balance 
will be maintained between so-called intellectual and manual training 
subjects. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are three literary societies, one for young women and two 
for young men. The Alphian is the organization of the young 
women, and the Sigma Pi Iota and Mechanic Arts Society those of 
the young men. 

Two glee clubs, the "Schubert' ' (young women) and the "Or- 
pheus" (young men) and a band are maintained. The course in 
music in public schools has been considerably enlarged and made 
more interesting and valuable to the student in reference to general 
education. Several recitals and concerts are given during the year. 
A half year credit in music may be earned by faithful glee club 
work. 

Young women's christian association. A voluntary organ- 
ization which aims to promote Christian life among the young 
women of the school. 

Young men's christian association. A branch of the Young 
Men's Christian Association is maintained under the management of 
the students. 

Athletics. Foot-ball, basket-ball, baseball and track athletics 
are organized and games are played under supervision of the faculty. 
A regular athletic director is employed, who has charge of all ath- 



20 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

letic activities. The coach and captains of the teams for 1914-15 are: 

J. E. S wetland Athletic Director 

Vern Crary Captain of Foot-ball Team 

Floyd Brown Captain of Basket-ball Team 

Edwin Sauer Captain of Base-ball Team 

ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

A splendid entertainment course is maintained by the school. 
For 1914-15 the following are some of the numbers chosen: Ed- 
mund Vance Cooke, The Von-Geltch-Basset Company, President 
Edwin Erie Sparks, The Bostonia Sextette, Professor Joseph Ken- 
nedy, Miss Nellie Peck Saunders and the North Dakota University 
Glee Club. A student rate of one dollar for a season ticket is made, 
the regular price of season tickets being two dollars and fifty cents. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

A joint summer school is maintained comprising the counties of 
Sargent, Emmons, Mcintosh, Logan and Dickey. A six weeks' 
session immediately following the regular school year is held. Stu- 
dents and teachers may take work and earn credits to be applied 
toward the completion of any course. A special summer school 
bulletin is published announcing the work of this session of the 
school. A copy may be obtained for the asking. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of the city take a deep interest in the 
students, many of whom are identified with their activities. Stu- 
dents are urged to attend the church of their choice. Bible study 
classes covering the state high school syllabus will be organized in 
the Methodist, Presbyterian, Catholic and Baptist Sunday Schools. 
These will be under competent leaders and students who successfully 
pursue the course may earn a half year credit to be accepted as an 
elective in any course. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Study this catalogue thoroughly. 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 21 

Bring with you such text books as you may need. 

Write the president that you are coming. 

Come with a determination to make the school year the best 
year of your life. 

Bring a letter of recommendation from your pastor or teacher. 
This is not required but serves as a letter of introduction. 



22 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The following courses of study have been carefully arranged to 
comply with the laws of the state and the regulations of the state 
board of education taking effect May i, 1914. 

Unless otherwise specified all subjects require five recitations 
per week. Two laboratory or shop periods are required for one 
period of credit. If public school music, public school drawing, 
domestic science or manual training are taken as electives in Normal 
courses at least twenty-four weeks' work must be taken to secure 
credit to be applied toward a teacher's certificate. 

RURAL ELEMENTARY NORMAL COURSE 
Leading to a second grade elementary certificate 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Summer 


Eng.I.(Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 


Language & 
Grammar 


Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 


Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 


Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 


*Physiology 
*Civics 


U. S. History 
Elective 


U. S. History 
Elective 


Pedagogy 
Elective 


*Two daily 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


recitations. 



TWO YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a first grade elementary certificate 





Fall Term 


Winter Term, 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 




Lit. of Grades 


Geography 


Geography 




Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 




U. S. History 


U. S. History 


Pedagogy 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


II. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Physiology 


Botany 


Civics 




Normal Grammar 


Elem. Psych. 


Elem. Psych. 




Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



23 



FOUR YEAR NORMAL COURSE 
Leading to a second grade professional certificate 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 




Lit. of Grades 


Geography 


Geography 




Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 




P. S. Music 


P. S. Music 


P. S. Music 




P. S. Drawing 


P. S. Drawing 


P. S. Drawing 




Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


II. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Physiology 


Botany 


Botany 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. * 


Drill or Gym. 


III. 


English III. 


English III. 


English III. 




PI. Geom. 


PI. Geom. 


PL Geom. 




Modern History 


Modern History 


Modern History 




Normal Grammar 


Rev. & Meth. 


Rev. & Meth. 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


TV. 


American History 


American History 


Civil Government 




Psychology 


Psychology 


Psychology 




Hist, of Ed. 


Prin. of Ed. 


School Admin. 




Adv. Pedagogy 


Obs. & Pract. 


Obs. & Pi act. 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 



24 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



FIVE YEAR NORMAL COURSE 
Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


II. 


English 11. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Physiology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


III. 


English III. 
PL Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


IV. 


American History 
Normal Grammar 
Hist, of Ed. 
Latin I or German 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


American History 

Rev. & Meth. 

Prin. of Ed. 

Latin I or German I 

Elective 

Gymnasium 


Civil Government 
Rev. & Meth. 
School Admin. 
Latin I or German I 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


V. 


Psychology 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Elective 
| Elective 


Psychology 

Obs. & Pract. 

Lat. II or Germ. II 

Elective 

Elective 


Psychology 
Obs. & Pract. 
Lat. II or Germ. II 

Elective 
Elective 




£ 



-3 

v. 



5 



Normal and Industrial School Cataloa 



25 



ONE YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 
Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Normal Grammar 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


Psychology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Pract. 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


Psychology 
School Admin. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Pract. 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



TWO YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 



I. 


Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Psycliology 

Normal Grammar 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


Psvchology 
ReV. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


IL 


Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Pract. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 


School Admin. 
Obs. & Pract. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



26 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 
Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 




Physiology 


Geography 


Geography 




Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 




Drawing 


Drawing 


Drawing 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


II. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Hand Sewing) 


Garment) 


Simple) 




Drafting) 


Making) 


Dressmaking) 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


III. 


English III. 


English III. 


English III. 




PI. Geom. 


PI. Geom. 


Yl Geom. 




Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 




Normal Grammar 


Rev. and' Meth. 


Rev. and Meth. 




The House) 


PI. H. Management) 


Home Nursing) 




Cooking I.) 


Cooking I. ) 


Cooking I. ) 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 
Civil Government 


IV. 


American History 


American History 




Sp. Meth. 


Sp. Meth. 


Economics 




Physics 


Phvsics 


Physics 




Adv. Ped. 


Obs. & Pract. 


Obs. & Pract. 




Laundry ) 


Food Analysis) 


Food Analysis) 




Bacteriology) 


Basketry ) 


Dietetics ) 




Cooking II. ) 




Sanitation ) 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


V. 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Psychology 




Hist, of Ed. 


Prin. of Ed. 


School Admin. 




Adv. Chem. 


Adv. Chem. 


Adv. Chem. 




Design & ) 


Textiles ) 


Millinery ) 




Patterns ) 




Arts Design ) 




Dressmaking) 


Dressmaking) 


Dressmaking) 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



27 



NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 




Physiology 


1 Geography 


Geography 




Agriculture 


| Agriculture 


Agriculture 




Arithmetic 


i Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 




Man. Tr. I. 


! Man. Tr. I. 


Man. Tr. I. 




Drill 


1 Drill 


Drill 


II. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Man. Tr. II. 


Man. Tr. II. 


Man. Tr. II. 




Drill 


Drill 


Drill 


III. 


English III. 


English III. 


English III. 




PI. Geom. 


PL Geom. 


PI. Geom. 




Physics 


Physics 


Physics 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Man. Tr. III. 


Man. Tr. III. 


Man. Tr. III. 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


IV. 


American History 


American History 


Civil Government 




Solid Geom. 


Solid Geom. (y 2 ) 








Adv. Algebra (y 2 ) 


Adv. Algebra 




Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 




Normal Grammar 


Rev. and Meth. 


Rev. and Meth. 




Man. Tr. IV. 


Man. Tr. IV. 


Man. Tr. IV. 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


v 


Ap. Mechanics 


Pract. Teaching 


Ap. Mechanics 




Hist, of Ed. 


Prin. of Ed. 


School Admin. 




Psychology 


Psychology 


Psychology 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Man. Tr. V. 


Man. Tr. V. 


Man. Tr. V. 



28 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 





fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Physiology 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Mech. Arts I. 

Drill 


English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Mech. Arts I. 

Drill 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 


II. 


English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill 


III. 


English III. 
PL Geom. 
Physics 
Cost Keeping 
Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 


English III. 
PL Geom. 
Physics 
Cost Keeping 
Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 


English III. 
PL Geom. 
Physics 
Cost Keeping 
Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 


IV. 


American History 
Solid Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 
Mech. Arts IV. 
Gymnasium 


American History 

Solid Geom. ( { / 2 ) 

Adv. Algebra \y 2 ) 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 


Civil Government 

Adv. Algebra 
Chemistry 
Elective 
Mech. Arts IV. 
Gymnasium 


V. 


A.p. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 

Mech. Arts V. 


Engines 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 
Mech. Arts V. 


Ap. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 
Mech, Arts V. 



Electives : English IV, Latin or German, Fine Arts, Commercial 
Arts, Industrial Physics or Advanced Mechanic Arts (Mechanic Arts 
V), Music. 

Mechanic Arts V: One year's work selected from the following: 
Carpentry and Building, Building Construction, Joinery and Cabinet- 
Making, Concrete Construction, Electric Wiring, Machine Shop Practice, 
Interior Finishing and Painting, Engines, Blacksmithing, Machine Draw- 
ing, Architectural Drawing, and Plumbing and Steam Fitting. 



Norma! and Industrial School Catalog 



29 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 




Physiology 


Geography 


Geography 




Hand Sewing and 


Garment Making 


Simple Dressmaking 




Drafting 








Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


11. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 




Cooking I. 


Cooking I. House- 


Cooking I. 




The House 


hold Management 


Home Nursing 




Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 


III. 


English III. 


English III. 


English III. 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




PI. Geom. 


PI. Geom. 


PI. Geom. 




Physics 


Physics 


Physics 




Cooking II. 


Basketry 


Dietetics 




Bacteriology 


Food Analysis 


Food Analysis 




Laundry Work 




Sanitation 


IV. 


English IV. 


English IV. 


English IV. 




American History 


American History 


Civil Government 




Adv. Chemistry 


Adv. Chemistry 


Adv. Chemistry 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Design & Patterns 


Textiles 


Millinery 




Dressmaking 


Dressmaking 


Dressmaking 
Arts Design 



3Q 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



COMMERCIAL-ACADEMIC COURSE 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 


English I. 


English I. 




Typewriting I. 


Typewriting I. 


Typewriting I. 




Normal Arith. 


Normal Arith. 


Comm Arith. 




Penmanship and 


Penmanship and 


Penmanship and 




Spelling 


Spelling 


Spelling 




Stenography I or 


Stenography I or 


Stenography I or 




Bookkeeping I 


Bookkeeping I 


Bookkeeping I 


II. 


English II. 


English II. 


English II. 




Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 




Stenography II or 


Stenography II or 


Stenography II or 




Bookkeeping II 


Bookkeeping II 


Bookkeeping II 




Stenography I or 


Stenography I or 


Stenography I or 




Bookkeeping I 


Bookkeeping I 


Bookkeeping I 




Typewriting II or 


Typewriting II or 


Typewriting II or 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


III. 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Geometrv 




Ancient History 


Ancient History 


Ancient History 




Business English 


Commercial Law 


Business English 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


IV. 


Normal Grammar 


Rev. and Meth. 


Rev. and Meth. 




American History 


American History 


Civil Govt. 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 



Sten- 



Students specializing in Stenography take Bookkeeping I, 
ography II, and Typewriting II. 

Those specializing in Bookkeeping take Stenography I, Typewriting 
I, and Bookkeeping II. 

Certain regulations have been adopted regarding the Commercial- 
Academic Course, with which the student must make himself familiar. 
All enrollments in these courses must be made by the Director of the 
Commercial Department. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



3i 



ACADEMIC COURSE 





Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


I. 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Agriculture 

Latin I or German I 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


English I. 

Agriculture 

Latin I or German I 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


English I. 

Agriculture 

Latin I or German I 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 


II. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 


III. 


English III. 

PL Geom. 

Chem. or Physics 

Elective 

Gymnasium 


English III. 

PL Geom. 

Chem. or Physics 

Elective 

Gymnasium 


English III. 

PL Geom. 

Chem. or Physics 

Elective 

Gymnasium 


IV. 


English IV. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


English IV. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 


English IV. 
Civil Government 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



32 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



Normal Department 




NE of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public 
school conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other re- 
quirement relating to education is of such pressing importance. The 
Act which defines the mission of the State Normal-Industrial School 
requires it to train teachers "in the science of education and the art 
of teaching in the public schools with special reference to manual 



Elementary pedagogy. A brief course in the principles and 
methods of teaching and general school management offered to stu- 
dents who are unable to remain in school a sufficient length of time 
to complete a full course. This course includes a brief study of the 
presentative, representative and reflective powers ; the ends of edu- 
cation ; the means ; the principles involved ; general methods ; 
methods in particular branches, etc. 

Psychology. One year's work in psychology is given. The 
general characteristics and laws of mental life and the functions of 
the various mental processes are studied. A brief course in physio- 
logical psychology and a term's work in child study are also included. 

Two terms of elementary psychology are given in the two year 
Normal Course leading to a first grade elementary certificate. This 
work will be accepted in lieu of the first term's work in the course 
in psychology given in the senior year. 

History of education. A study of the educational systems 
of the chief nations of antiquity; education in its relation to Chris- 
tianity; the Renaissance, the Reformation and the forces operative 
in our own era; a study of the life and practices of the chief edu- 




Table Set for May Day Luncheon 




A Class in Cookery 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 33 

cational reformers in the light of prevailing theories. Numerous 
outside reading and class reviews are required. 

Principles of education. A broad conception of the prin- 
ciples of education is here presented. Especial attention is given to 
such themes as the functions of teaching and of subject matter, mo- 
tivation, correlation, concentration, etc. The aim is to familiarize 
the student with such principles of education as will enable him to 
meet intelligently problems of class room instruction. A professional 
thesis is required of each one completing this course. 

School administration. This course is to consider problems 
of importance not ordinarily met in the class room instruction. The 
relationship of officers, teachers, parents, and pupils as well as ques- 
tions of organization and administration pertaining to the state law, 
course of study, daily programs, examinations, promotions and mat- 
ters of discipline will be discussed. 

Primary methods. A course designated especially for those 
who anticipate teaching in the primary grades. Industrial work, 
story telling, phonetic reading, primary songs and number work is 
emphasized from the view point of daily plans. The work is prin- 
cipally lectures and students are required to make carefully written 
reports. 

Advanced pedagogy. This is especially for Senior students 
who enroll for practice. It is designed to meet the problems peculiar 
to the Observation and Practice work. 

Literature in the grades. This consists of a careful study of 
some of the classics required by the state course of study for the 
grades. In this work the aim is to bring out not only the thoi 
but also the beauty, form and manner of the presentation and make 
the prospective teacher familiar with the subject matter of reading. 

Geography. Two terms' work is required in Normal courses. 
This includes a review of descriptive and political geography with 
methods of teaching. Some study is also made of the elements of 
mathematical and physical geography. 

Reviews and methods. The subject matter of arithmetic, 
grammar, history and geography reviewed ; the principles and meth- 
ods of teaching emphasized. The work is especially designed to train 



34. Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

students to teach. The subject matter, teacher's aim, method, prep- 
aration and presentation are carefully considered with special ref- 
erence to the grades. 

Observation and practice. Designed to train prospective 
teachers in the principles and methods of effective teaching. The 
opportunity for observation and practice teaching is found in the 
classes of the preparatory department, the department of manual 
training, and the department of domestic science and arts. Both 
observation and practice take place under the direct supervision of a 
trained teacher, who is thoroughly capable not only of directing the 
efforts of pupil-teachers but of offering the most helpful and pains- 
taking criticism. 

MECHANIC ARTS 

The purpose is two-fold: 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity for 
specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 

Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this 
work ; no school in the state is so well equipped. The shops and lab- 
oratories are well supplied with every modern appliance which can 
aid in acquiring practical knowledge of industrial subjects. A visit 
will convince. 

Mechanic Arts I. 
i. Joinery. 

a. Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, 
chisel, hammer, square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and other 
hand tools, in the construction of the principal joints employed in 
carpentry and joinery. 

b. When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful 
articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

c. Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a desk, 
table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order that they 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 35 

may make further application of the principles they have learned. 

d. Advanced cabinet making ; practice in the application of the 
principles of Joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, settees, 
stands, pedestals and cabinets of various designs. Pieces to be fin- 
ished in approved manner. 

2. Elementary cabinet making. 

3. Mechanical drawing. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instruments, 
with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

c. Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in me- 
chanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of construc- 
tion. 

d. Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of planes 
in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive geometry, is 
the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. In connection 
with it students are required to bring to class shop sketches or free- 
hand working drawings of various articles. Instrumental drawings 
are made from some of these sketches. 

Mechanic Arts II. 

* 

1. Forging. 

a. Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming angles 
from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms of weld- 
ing iron and mild steel. 

b. This course includes a number of useful articles, including a 
bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, clevis, cold 
chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making and 
tempering machine tools. 

2. Foundry practice. 

Molding and core work ; melting and casting iron and brass ; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices ; the mixing of 



36 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

iron; the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting of brass 
and other soft metals. 

Students make all castings for Machine Shop Work. 

3. Mechanical drawing. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental drawings, 
made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

c. Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

Mechanic Arts III. 

1. Turnery. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises 
through which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, concave 
curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turning, to- 
gether with exercises combining either number, or all, of these 
operations. 

Useful articles in which the principles learned in (a) are ap- 
plied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for various tools, 
a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair balusters and 
various other useful articles. This work is carried further in its 
application in pattern making. 

2. Pattern making. 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given to 
the work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made of a 
number of models which involve the more elementary problems in 
foundry practice; these are followed by patterns of parts of ma- 
chines, including a hand-wheel and blanks for a cam, gear-wheel and 
bevel-gear. 

3. Advanced cabinet making. 

4. Mechanical drawing. 







S 






&3 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 37 

a. Sheet Metal Patterns. Graphical methods of solving prob- 
lems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application in 
sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns of stovepipe 
elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All articles in this course, 
of which patterns are made, are constructed either of metal or paper. 

b. Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story 
frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is made very 
practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the floor, base- 
ment and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sectional wall views 
showing the construction ; and at least two views of the completed 
structure — the drawings including roof plan and longitudinal and 
lateral sections. Specifications are drawn up and an estimate of the 
cost of building materials and labor is made. Tracings and blue 
prints are made of the complete set of plans. Special students are 
carrying this work further and are actually building models in the 
shop, in which the methods of construction are identical with those 
used in actual house building. 

Mechanic Arts IV. 

1. Chipping and filing. 

a. Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill in 
the use of the file and the cold chisel. These tools are of especial 
value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for instance, in 
erecting and repairing machinery whether in the shop or on the farm. 
Their usefulness is so well known, and the inability of the average 
man to use them properly is also so well known, that it seems proper 
to give them especial attention in this course. 

b. In connection with and in addition to the above a number 
of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 

2. Machine shop practice. 

a. Machine tool making. Students make and temper the tools 
which they will use in their Machine Tool Practice. 

b. Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms of 
machine tools, directions for operating machines and keeping tools 
in order; practice in centering and in plain, taper, and template turn- 



38 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

ing, chucking, drilling, boring, external and internal thread cutting; 
hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

c. Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling; 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, micrometer 
and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps and dies, 
machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In this course the 
machine work is done on the articles cast in the foundry during the 
preceding year. The greater share of the machine tool practice of 
the entire course consists in machining the products of the foundry. 

d. Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, a 
lathe, or some other project involving similar operations. 

3. Mechanical drawing. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Lettering and conventional representations of frequently re- 
curring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, etc. 

b. Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in pro- 
jection of complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct di- 
mensions supplied from measurements. Sketches to be neat and 
clear and dimensions properly placed. 

c. Working drawings from sketches. Finished working draw- 
ing from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings to be inked, 
others to be traced and from the tracings blue prints made. 

d. Machine design. Students to make original design of me- 
chanical appliance or machine. 



Mechanic Arts V. 

1. Applied mechanics. The object of this course is to pro- 
vide students with a practical statement of the principles of Me- 
chanics essential to an intelligent interest in the constructive arts. 
It embraces a study of simple framed structures, strength of mater- 
ials, beams, riveted joints, shafts, springs, elementary mechanism, 
simple machines, and hydraulics. 

2. Cost keeping. The object of this course is to provide the 
student with a method of determining the cost of construction, a 
study of time systems, and the elements of scientific management as 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 39 

applied to farm and factory work viewed from the standpoint of 
results shown by cost keeping. 

3. Engines and boilers. 

4. Vocational. ..For students taking Mechanic Arts Course. 

One year's work chosen from the following: Carpentry and 
building construction; joinery and cabinet making; concrete con- 
struction ; electric wiring ; painting ; interior finishing and decorating ; 
orating; architectural drawing; machine drawing, blacksmithing; 
machine shop practice ; steam and gas engines. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student work 
done in this department. 

5. Teachers' manual training. For students taking Nor- 
mal-Manual Training Course. 

(a) Hand-work for Primary Grades. 

1. Paper and cardboard construction. This work is taken 
up as it should be presented in the public schools. The different 
steps in paper folding are given, developing into the construction of 
familiar articles. The use of paste and scissors is developed early in 
the course. Freehand cutting is given for training the eye in regard 
to form and for composition. Portfolios, booklets, boxes, etc., are 
constructed of heavy paper and cardboard. 

2. Clay modelling and pottery. Some training is given in 
modeling type forms from simple objects in nature. The greater 
share of the time is devoted to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces in- 
volving different methods of construction. In the third and fourth 
grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class is instructed 
in the craft of mould made pieces and a few pieces are made by the 
class. Students glaze a part of their work. 

3. Weaving and basketry. Weaving begins with the use of 
paper mats, different patterns being worked out in several media. 
The materials included are raffia, jute, common wool yarns and, for 
the fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of the finest quality. Problems 
include pencil bags, book bags, holders, mats, special designed rugs, 



40 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

hammocks and larger rugs. Basketry consists of the problems used 
in elementary grades, simple rattan mats and baskets, handles, hinges, 
etc. Coiled mats and simple baskets are executed and a few methods 
of using raffia and constructive work are illustrated. 

(4) Thin wood construction. The assembling of thin pieces 
of wood by means of glue and brads to form miniature pieces of 
furniture ; the construction of a miniature house. The work con- 
sists, in part, of a combination of wood and cardboard. 

b. Woodzvork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 

( 1 ) Woodwork for fourth and fifth grades. The purpose 
here is to train the prospective teacher in the simpler processes in 
wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction in- 
tended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, they 
are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, for orig- 
inal design. The work is similar in character to courses offered in 
the elementary grades of any first class public school system. The 
tools used are the knife, block plane, back saw, coping saw, chisel, 
bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, hammer, rule and pen- 
cil. For most of the exercises the material is prepared in thickness 
before being given to the student. Workmanlike methods are aimed 
at; blue prints of the course are made. 

(2) Woodwork for the sixth, seventh and eighth grades. 
Here serious attention is first given to following the methods of the 
skilled mechanic. It is the aim to keep always in mind the interest 
and capacity of the pupils being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the public 
schools where there is an equipment of workbenches and a rather 
full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth grades there are num- 
erous exercises in cabinet making in which the simpler methods of 
joinery are involved. The use of sandpaper, filer, stains and varnish 
is introduced in finishing some of the pieces. 

c. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full Me- 
chanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive exercises 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 41 

in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construction, Wood Carv- 
ing, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and Design. 

(1) Manual training design. Study of the elements of de- 
sign, line, dark and light and color and the application of the prin- 
ciples of harmony. The object of the instruction is to develop ap- 
preciation through the study of art-structure. The course begins 
with design in the abstract, harmonious arrangement of spaces being 
given special attention. Application of the theory of design in tech- 
nical problems ; designs for furniture ; textiles, wall coverings, 
stained glass, interiors, etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 



Short Course in Farm Engineering. . {Two Years.) 

This work is conducted during the winter term and is planned 
to meet the most practical requirements of young men on the farm. 

1. Arithmetic. The elements; factoring; fractions; denomi- 
nate numbers ; measurements of walls, tanks, bins, lands, etc. ; ac- 
counts with farm crops ; problems relating to the farm, as cost of 
fences, buildings, silos, rations, etc ; commercial paper, etc. Course 
XL 

2. Agriculture. Soil and Soil Water ; Plant, Plant Food and 
Growth; Rotation of Crops; Germination; Seed Testing; Trans- 
planting, etc. Course XX. 

3. Carpentry. Tools ; the joints and splices necessary in farm 
construction; working drawings and construction in miniature. 
Special emphasis on house and barn construction. 

4. Blacksmithing. Pupils make from stock, tongs, hammer, 
chisels, rings, links, chains, devices, harrow teeth, etc. Horse shoe- 
ing and plow repairs. 

5. Steam engines. A study of the different types of steam 
engines, single, double, simple and compound, advantages and dis- 
advantages of each. The steam valve, its motion and the different 
mechanisms by which the motion is obtained. 

a. Appliances. A thorough study of the hydrostatic and me- 
chanical methods of supplying lubrication. The indicator as a means 



42 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

of studying pressure, correct valve setting, the construction and 
application of the Prony brake, tests for both indicated and brake 
horsepower. 

b. Speed regulating device. The study of the different forms 
of governors, weights, springs and dash-pots. The application of 
certain forms of governors to certain kinds of engines. Engine 
practice. 

6. Boilers. The study of the more common types of boilers, 
safety devices, feed pumps, feed water heaters and injectors, boiler 
testing, boiler repairs and boiler compounds, furnaces, grates, stokers 
and ash handling machinery. Boiler practice. 

7. Gas engines. Gas engine principles, types and regulating 
devices ; methods of ignition. In this course special attention will 
be given to the adjustment of working parts supplemented by talks 
on gas engine fuels and their manufacture. Gas Engine practice. 
Rope splicing, belt lacing, knot tying. Advanced tractor practice. 

8. Power transmission. The various methods employed in 
the transmission of power and the application of the more common 
types ; shaftings and bearings ; babbitting ; couplings ; pulleys ; tooth 
and friction gears ; clutches ; rope and chain drives ; belts and belt- 
ing; splicing and lacing; practical problems in figuring the size and 
speed of pulleys for required conditions of work, belt slippage and 
preventatives. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The course is designed to afford instruction in the subjects 
which pertain to life in the home. The training to be obtained 
through motor activity is regarded as one of the principal educational 
functions of both domestic science and art; the sociological and 
ethical value of such work is emphasized. 

The department occupies the entire Home Economics Building 
with sewing rooms, kitchen, dining and recitation room and fitting 
room. 

The sewing rooms are large, well lighted and commodious. They 
are equipped with sewing machines, lockers, charts, cutting tables, 
individual tables, dress forms and wall cases for the purpose of ex- 






Normal and Industrial School Catalog 43 

hibiting the work, etc. The best fashion magazines are received 
regularly. 

The kitchen is supplied with desks for individual work, equipped 
with all the necessary cooking utensils ; gas stoves ; electric plates for 
individual use; gas range; coal range; refrigerator; cupboards; 
kitchen cabinet ; sink, and the cooking utensils necessary to provide 
the best facilities for class work. 

The dining room is equipped with dining table, dining chairs, 
china closet, buffet, etc. It is also supplied with china, silver, linen, 
etc. 

The recitation room is supplied with reference books, charts and 
magazines devoted to the subject of domestic science. 

Sewing I. A double period daily throughout the year. 

Hand sewing. Primary stitches, seams, plackets, hems and 
patches are developed on samplers and simple articles. 

Drafting. The Snow Success Drafting System is used. Stu- 
dents draft all patterns used the first year. Students are required to 
purchase drafting system, price $3.00. 

Garment making. The making of a fourpiece suit of under- 
wear ; two plain waists, a gingham dress and a simple dress of thin 
material. 

.Sewing II. A double period daily throughout the year. 

Dressmaking. Bought patterns are introduced and drafting 
continued with special attention to design. Students are required to 
make one tailored waist, fancy blouse, tailored skirt, party dress and 
at least two other garments. 

Art needlework. The making and application of the prin- 
cipal stitches in embroidery, crochet, ornamental darning and ap- 
pliquet. 

Millinery. Fall term — The making of buckram frames and 
covering; making of bows, folds, selection of material as to quality, 
color and suitability. Spring term — Making of wire frame, covering, 



44 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



sewing on braid ; draping of chiffon ; making bows, flowers and or- 
naments; combining of materials; renovating old materials. 

Textiles. A study of fibers, flax, wool, cotton, and silk; their 
history, source, value, manufacture, adulteration and care. 

Domestic art design. The elements of design ; line, light, 
shade, color; principles of harmony; the appreciation of structure. 
The course, in part, is devoted to the application of the theory of 
design to technical problems such as designs for basketry, rugs, wall 
decoration, textiles, stenciling, etc. 

Cooking I. 

Classification of foods according to food principles ; value of 
each to the body; effect of heat, and resulting changes in digest- 
ibility; food economy, physiological and pecuniary; selection and 
care of foods. 

Laboratory. Three two-hour periods each w r eek through the 
year. 

Theory. Two one-hour recitation periods each week. This 
course must be accompanied or preceded by first year chemistry. 
Cooking II. 

Theory and practice of the principles of the first year's work 
are elaborated and applied in the second year. Preservation of foods 
is included. Individual demonstrations of methods used in the prep- 
aration of foods, accompanied by lectures on the topics and materials 
thus illustrated, are required. These demonstration lectures are 
given by each senior in turn, before students and members of the 
faculty. The planning, marketing, directing and preparing, and 
serving of meals, including computation of cost for each item. The 
inviting, receiving, and entertaining of guests. This work is required 
of each student in turn. 

Serving. Study of principles underlying the effective and at- 
tractive serving of food at formal and informal meals, also of re- 
freshments at various social functions. Practical work. 

Dietetics. Study of foods and their relation to the body. Food 
values ; proportions of tissue-building and energy-producing sub- 
stance, digestibility and ease of assimilation, monetary value of 





"")$• 






•^ 




M f 




M . " ■ . - 




<~ 


■» * « •*, : - 




: 






r 


.*. . .> 









cq 



o 

ft. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 45 

nutrients contained. Foods suitable for infants, for adults under 
varying conditions, and for invalids. Food combinations and cal- 
culation of dietaries; the study of dietetic and economic problems. 

Laboratory. Three two-hour periods each week through the 
year. 

Theory. Two one-hour recitation periods each week. 

Household management. Study of materials used in finish- 
ing, decorating, and furnishing a house, their comparative cost, dur- 
ability, and care; ordering and arrangement of housework under 
varying conditions. Practical application of the processes of clean- 
ing is made by students under direction. 

Laundry work. Mineral constituents of different waters, soft- 
ening and cleansing agents, their effect upon fabrics and colors ; re- 
moval of stains; use of starches and bluings; preparation of articles 
for laundering. Practical work includes laundering of bed and body 
linen, thin gowns, shirt-waist suits ; washing of woolens and cleaning 
of laces and delicate articles. 

Study of the home. Evolution of the home ; household indus- 
tries ; household service. The dwelling ; arrangement, decoration, 
and furnishing. 

Household business. Household accounts ; methods of 
payment ; contracts ; orders ; other matters of business usage. The 
computing of cost of menus. Division of incomes for family groups 
in different circumstances and environments. 

Home nursing. The formal work includes the study of foods 
and diet, digestion, and nutrition ; discussion as to the location, fur- 
nishing and sanitation of the sick room; the details of the care of a 
patient in the home ; the intelligent keeping of memoranda to aid the 
physicians in watching the progress of the disease ; prevention and 
care of contagious diseases. Occasional lectures and demonstrations 
by physicians. Practical work under a trained nurse, in the college 
infirmary, including emergency relief and first aid to the injured. 

Sanitation, general and household. Lectures and reference 
work on the following topics : Relation of micro-organisms to the 
water, ice and milk supplies, and to the various uncooked foods ; dis- 



46 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

posal of garbage and sewage ; prevention of common transmissible 
diseases ; care by the public of public buildings and streets. 

Bacteriology. Four hours a week during the first semester. 
Recitation and experiments. Bacteria, yeasts and molds. Cultures 
are made and life habits of each studied. Especial attention is given 
to the molds and bacteria of the household-pathogenic bacteria are 
studied ; the precautions that should be taken in preventing infection 
are dealt with extensively. 

Food analysis. Four hours a week during the second semester. 
The essential materials in a complete food ; the reactions that occur 
in their preparation for use ; adulterants, and the adulteration of the 
common foods, how recognized and household tests. Prerequisite 

Chemistry I. 

Short Course in Dressmaking. {Winter Term.) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of 
girls who desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking 
and whose time and means are limited. The course embraces the 
following subjects : 

(i) Arithmetic. A practical course in the elements; factor- 
ing ; fractions ; denominate numbers ; household accounts, etc. 

(2) Grammar. A review of the elements of English Grammar. 

(3) Cookery. The underlying principles of cooking; daily 
practice in cooking; table setting, serving, etc. 

(4) Dressmaking. Instruction in hand sewing and dress- 
making; the cutting, fitting and making of dresses; thorough drill in 
pattern drafting and dressmaking. 

MATHEMATICS 

Arithmetic. A complete review of the essentials of arithmetic, 
including the fundamental processes, factoring, fractions, decimals, 
denominate numbers, longitude and time, practical measurements 
and percentage, together with the best methods of presenting these 
various subjects to pupils of the public schools. All abstract com- 
binations are preceded, as far as possible, by constructive effort and 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 47 

the work made objective. In the more advanced units of study the 
subjects will be treated as they occur in actual business transactions 
regardless of text book limits. 

Arithmetic, (short course.) Industrial Arithmetic. Chief 
emphasis will be laid upon problems pertaining to the farm. The 
work will involve factors, fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, 
practical measurements and percentage. Problems dealing with such 
themes as the cots of buildings, marketing, measurements, insurance, 
taxes and banking will be taught in the most practical business-like 
fashion. Daily through the Winter Term. 

Algebra, one year. All elementary algebra is covered up to 
and including quadratic equations, especial emphasis being laid on 
the fundamental laws of algebra, their derivation, and their relation 
to the solution of problems. The relation of algebra to arithmetic 
and to the higher branches of mathematics is constantly kept in mind 
and the advantages of algebra noted. 

Plane geometry, one year. Geometry, inductive and de- 
ductive. The student is grounded in the fundamental principles of 
the subject. Methods of reasoning; the classification of the various 
geometrical forms, lines, angles, and surfaces, and the various kinds 
of proofs. The relation of Geometry to Arithmetic. Especial em- 
phasis on original and inventive work. The method of original 
demonstration through analysis, construction and proof. Many 
problems in engineering and surveying. 

Solid geometry, one-half year. In order that the subject 
may be more easily comprehended, geometrical solids are employed 
in the demonstration of each proposition, and the students are also 
required, from time to time, to fashion out of cardboard various 
solids for use in demonstrating problems in construction. The appli- 
cation of geometry to science and industry receives much attention. 

Algebra il one-half year. The graph, quadratic equations 
reviewed and completed. The theory of proportion. Problems and 
formulae of physics. Progressions, Logarithms. 

Plane trigonometry and surveying, one year. The the- 
oretical part of the subject is practically completed at mid-year. 
Consideration of the surveying instruments, including chain and 



48 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

tape, compass, level, transit and planimeter. After spring opens 
practically all of the time is devoted to field work. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters in the basement of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room and 
apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 25x35 feet conveniently 
arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Carnegie 
Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and apparatus for 
twenty-four students working at one time. 

Physics a. Seven hours a week for the year. This course con- 
sists of lectures, experiments and recitations. The experiments are 
simple, yet full and exhaustive. Especial attention is given to the 
solution of problems involving physical laws and formulae. A series 
of forty-eight experiments is prescribed and performed by students 
during the year and careful tabulations are made of the results. 
Especial attention is given to the fundamentals that lead up to the 
various courses in engineering. 

Physics b. Seven hours a week for the year. Lectures will be 
given to cover the more advanced work in mechanics, the practical 
appliances on heat, light, and electricity and the more complex for- 
mulae for solving physical problems. Laboratory work will be 
given, which has especial bearing on the topics studied and which 
will be of particular benefit to the student specializing in the Me- 
chanic Arts. Prerequisite, Physics A. 

General chemistry. Seven hours a week for the year. Three 
periods a week are devoted to the study of the laws, theories, for- 
mulae and fundamental principles of chemistry and to the solution of 
problems in chemical arithmetic. Two double periods each week are 
devoted to laboratory work. Over one hundred experiments involv- 
ing chemical change, affinity, valence, etc., are performed and noted 
so that the student both becomes familiar with the manipulation of 
apparatus and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

Chemistry of foods. Daily throughout the Fall term. De- 
signed especially for young women who are pursuing domestid 




Basket Ball Team 




Basket Ball — Second Team 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 49 

science courses. The essential materials in a complete food; the 
reactions that occur in their preparation for use ; the common adul- 
terations ; the foods in which commonly found ; how recognized ; 
household tests, etc. Prerequisite, courses XXVI, XXVII. 

Qualitative analysis. Daily for the first four and one-half 
months. Lecture once a week. Laboratory work four times a week. 
The course consists of a systematic study of the bases, and elements 
and radicals, and a method of analyzing an unknown substance of 
complex composition. Emphasis is placed on such methods as can be 
used in quantitative determinations. Prerequisites, General Chem- 
istry and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

Quantitative analysis. Five times a week for the last half 
of the year. Two and one-half months given to gravimetric analysis 
and two months given to valumetric analysis. Some simple sub- 
stances that illustrate the fundamentals of quantitative work, are 
taken up first. Then such as pig iron, steel, cement, soil, water for 
potable purposes, water for boiler purposes are analyzed. Prere- 
quisites, General Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis and Elementary 
Qualitative Analysis. 

Bacteriology. Five hours a week for the Spring term. Ar- 
ranged to meet the needs of domestic science students. Recitations 
and experiments. The yeast plant is studied in all the important de- 
tails of its life habits. Especial attention is given to the molds and 
bacteria of the household. The life habits of the bacilli, their re- 
lations to health and disease, the precautions that should be taken in 
preventing infection are dealt with extensively. 

AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGY 

Agriculture i. The work is divided into three parts : Labora- 
tory study, recitation from text, and reporting and discussing present 
day farm topics. One theme on a special subject is required of each 
student. The general field of agriculture is studied, with especial 
emphasis placed on those phases that are of vital importance to 
farmers in North Dakota. Laboratory study is made of farm crops, 
soils, crop rotation and farm management. Part of the spring term 
is devoted to garden work. Agriculture I is required in all courses 
excepting the Commercial-Academic Course. 



5o Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Agriculture ii. Advanced course open only to students who 
have completed Course I or who may be otherwise specially fitted for 
more advanced work. The aim is to prepare students to teach ag- 
riculture, as well as to fit them better for farm practice. This course 
is of much greater value than the other w r ork offered in agriculture 
in that it allows a more scientific study of the subjects treated. In 
Course I it is impossible to do more than to introduce topics and give 
them a general study, while this course allows a student to do con- 
siderable independent work of the greatest value. 

Agriculture, summer school. Given only in the summer 
term. This course aims to cover the field of agriculture in a general 
way that will help the rural teacher in presenting it to farmer boys 
and girls. It consists of text book study supplemented with outside 
reading, lectures and laboratory work. The exercises and experi- 
ments done in the laboratory are only those that can be done in any 
rural school room. The course is divided about as the regular school 
year so the teacher may work up an outline for the whole year's 
work from that done in summer. 

Agriculture, short course. Given during the winter term to 
accommodate young men from the farms who can be in school but a 
few months during the winter. Special phases of agriculture are 
studied in laboratory and class recitation. Two days a week are 
spent in laboratory work, two in text recitation, and one in discussing 
current farm topics in farm papers. 

Physiology and hygiene. This is offered during the fall term. 
Four periods a week are spent in text study and discussion, and one 
double period in laboratory work. Experiments and dissections are 
carried on with as much detail as is necessary to get an insight into 
the vital processes of life. Hygiene is made an important part of the 
work. 

Botany. Offered during the winter and spring terms, three 
single and two double periods a week. Required of all students in 
the four and five year normal courses, and one term is required of 
students taking the two year normal course. The trend of this 
course is very modern. Almost no time is spent studying the non- 
vascular plants not having a definite agricultural importance. Es- 
pecial emphasis is placed upon the relation between botany and ag- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 51 

riculture, thus laying an excellent foundation for later pursuit along 
agricultural lines. Laboratory work consists mainly of experimental 
work designed to show the physiological action of plants. During 
the spring considerable out-of-door work is done, and a small herbar- 
ium is made during the latter part of the year. 

ENGLISH 

The work in English covers four years, three years' work being 
required for graduation. Special attention is given in all classes to 
the student's spoken and written language. 

Grammar. A thorough study of theoretical and applied gram- 
mar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the use of 
correct forms of speech with special attention to common errors. 
Elementary composition. 

English 1. (a) Review of English grammar ; three recitations 
a week, for three months. 

(b) Elementary composition and rhetoric. Letter- writing, de- 
scription, narration. An average of three recitations *>cr week for 
six months. Special emphasis put upon punctuation, spelling, cap- 
italization, paragraph structure, figures of speech. Numerous short 
compositions are required. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Scott's Marmion; Burroughs' 
Sharp Eyes ; Dickens' Christmas Carol ; Gray's Elegy ; Hawthorne's 
Great Stone Face, The Ambitious Guests, The Great Carbuncle; 
Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Irving's Rip Van Winkle, Legend 
of Sleepy Hollow. 

For reading: Cooper's Last of the Mohicans ; Poe's Gold Bug; 
Warner's A Hunting of the Deer, How I Killed a Bear; Hale's The 
Man Without a Country. 

English ii. (a) Advanced composition and rhetoric, two 
recitations a week. Review and continued description and narration, 
usage, diction, clearness, force, elegance, paragraphing, principles of 
versification ; periodic, balanced, loose, long and short sentences ; 
figures of speech. Work in composition required throughout the 
year. Special attention given to exposition and argumentation. 



52 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

(b) Masterpieces for study: Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; 
Burns' The Cotter's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, To a Mountain 
Daisy, For A' That and A' That, Epistle to J. Lapraik, Highland 
Mary, to Mary in Heaven, My Heart's in the Highlands, Bruce to 
His Men at Bannockburn, Bonnie Doon; Addison's DeCoverly 
Papers; Milton's Minor Poems; The Merchant of Venice; Cole- 
ridge's Ancient Mariner. 

For reading: As You Like It; The Iliad (Books I, 6, 22, 24) ; 
The Lady of the Lake ; Dickens' David Copperfield. 

English hi. (a) History of English Literature. 

(b) Written reviews are required of assigned plays and work. 
The composition work is based upon the masterpieces studied and 
takes the form of critical and biographical essays. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Burke's Conciliation, Macbeth, 
Newcomer and Andrews' Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and 
Prose. 

For reading: Silas Marner, Julius Caesar, Ivanhoe; Tenny- 
son's The Coming of Arthur, Launcelot and Elaine, Guinevere, The 
Passing of Arthur. 

English iv. (a) History of American literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library supple- 
mented by text books. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a 
Water-Fowl, A Forest Hymn, The Flood of Years, The Green 
Mountain Boys, The Yellow Violet, To a Fringed Gentian ; Emer- 
son's Compensation, Self-Reliance; Lincoln's First and Second In- 
augural Addresses, Gettysburg Speech, The Emancipation Procla- 
mation ; Poe's Poems ; Taylor's Lars ; Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration ; Whittier's Slavery Poems and Snowbound. 

For reading: Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac ; Hawthorne's 
House of Seven Gables ; Parkman's LaSalle ; Thoreau's The Succes- 
sion of Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds; W T arner's My Summer 
in a Garden. 



aiiwiiiiiiii|lllHii|iii||ii||i 




Normal and Industrial School Catalog 53 

LATIN 

Latin i. The elements. Daily throughout the year. Careful 
study and practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections and 
syntax, a gaining of a working vocabulary. Translating of simple 
prose. Much time and emphasis is placed upon the translation of 
English into Latin. Word formation also receives considerable 
attention. 

Latin, ii. Gesar. Four books ; translation into clear idiomatic 
English; the life of Csesar; the Roman government of his time; the 
formation of the Roman army; sight reading; prose composition 
based upon the text of Caesar. 

Latin hi. Six orations ; four in Catalinam ; De Imperio Pompei 
or Pro Marcello and Pro Archia; the life of Cicero; the history of 
his time ; Roman oratory ; sight reading ; prose composition based on 
the text; memorizing of especial passages of Pro Archia. 

Latin iv. Vergil. Six books of the Aeneid; syntax; gram- 
matical peculiarities ; occasional metrical translation ; the life of 
Vergil; the history of his times; the mythology of the Aeneid; the 
versification of the Aeneid. 

GERMAN 

Elementary German. For beginners. Special attention is 
given to correct pronunciation, the principles of grammar, the con- 
version of simple prose from German into English and from English 
into German, and to conversation exercises. 

German reading. Review of the grammar; practice in trans- 
lating from German into idiomatic English ; written exercises based 
on a text and Harris* Composition, and Joynes-Meissner's Grammar ; 
Hans Anderson's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, Storm's Immensee, Ger- 
stacker's Germelshausen, Dillard's Aus dem deutchen Dichterwald, 
Heyse's L'Arrabiata, Benedix's Die Hochzeitsreise, Schiller's Der 
Neff als Onkel, etc. 

Classic German. Joynes-Meissner's Grammar. Suderman's 
Johannes ; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm ; Goethe's Egmont ; Frey- 
tag's Die Journalisten ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, etc. 



54 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Bookkeeping i. Two terms' work in Goodyear & Marshall's 
'"Sixty Lessons in Business," — a merchandise set. One term of 
work on the lumber set in Goodyear & Marshall's "Advanced Ac- 
counting." Principally individual work. Students may enter at any 
time, but enrollment at the beginning of the year is greatly preferred. 
Open to eighth grade graduates. Counted as a full elective in all 
courses. Two periods per day of school work. One period is pre- 
scribed, while the other period can usually be arranged to suit the 
.student's convenience. 

^Bookkeeping II. Open only to those who have finished Book- 
keeping I. Those who have credit for a year of Bookkeeping else- 
where must do the lumber set (which is the third term of work in 
Bookkeeping I.) Professional skill is required for credit in this 
course. The student who has done well in Bookkeeping I can reason- 
ably expect to finish Bookkeeping II by three hours a day work for 
one year. The department and the school reserve the right to with- 
hold credit if the pupil has not attained sufficient skill, without re- 
gard to the length of time and quantity of work performed. This 
course is professional in nature, and will not be counted for credit 
except in commercial courses. Students must satisfy the require- 
ment stated under "Penmanship" before receiving credit for Book- 
keeping II. 

Stenography i. Munson system. Text book and easy dictation 
the work of the year. Will count as an elective in any course. Open 
only to students w r ho have made some progress beyond the eighth 
grade, and seem likely to carry the work with success. Consent of 
the teacher required for every enrollment. Only students who show 
considerable earnestness and capacity will be admitted late. Two 
hours a day of class work. 

Stenography ii. Open to those who have taken Stenography, 
and also to those who have learned elsewhere to take easy dictation. 
Students from other schools may enter the class, even though they 
write some other than the Munson system. This is a professional 
course, and will not be counted for credit except in the commercial 
courses. Open only to those who have taken typewriting for one 
year. Typewriting II must be taken at the same time. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 55 

Typewriting i. Open to any student. Two hours of practice 
per day is required, at hours most convenient to the student. Touch 
typewriting is taught and required. Credit in this course will depend 
upon the skill attained, and not upon the length of time spent. 
Mosher's charts are used. The first term's work will include the 
ability to write three lines per minute of material taken from the first 
five charts. This must be written without looking at the keyboard, 
and without error. The second term's work will be writing two lines 
per minute of ordinary new material. The third term's work will 
be writing three lines per minute, same conditions. This subject will 
be counted for credit only in the commercial courses. Individual. 
work, and students may enter at any time. 

Typewriting ii. A continuation of Typewriting I. Open only 
to those who are taking Stenography II. Will not be counted for 
credit except in the commercial courses. A professional degree of 
speed, accuracy, and skill in all phases of typewriting work is re- 
quired for credit. The department and school reserve the right to 
withhold credit from pupils who have not attained professional skill. 

Business English. Two terms of practice in writing business, 
letters. Open to those who have passed in English II and Type- 
writing I. 

Commercial arithmetic. Open only to those who have passed 
in Normal Arithmetic or in Algebra. One term. 

Commercial law. One term. Not open to first year students. 
Open to second year short course students. 

Spelling. Twenty minutes a day, three times a week. Each 
commercial student will be required to take this work until able to 
spell with not more than three mistakes a list of one hundred new, 
difficult words. This list will be compiled from words in common 
business, newspaper and literary use, and will not contain words that 
are unduly technical, nor any of the freaks of spelling. Important 
proper nouns will be included. 

Penmanship. Thirty minutes per day, twice a week. Work 
given in two sections, elementary and advanced. A fair start in the 
use of muscular writing will be required for admission to the ad- 
vanced section. The advanced course will be a study of the Palmer 



56 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Method of Business Writing. The students shall enrroll the Stu- 
dents' Crticism Course, as described in the pamphlet issued by the 
A. N. Palmer Co., entitled "Pupils' Criticism Department of the 
Palmer Method of Business Writing." Pupils will have to submit 
drills as specified in that pamphlet, and will have to win the Final 
Certificate before receiving credit for Bookkeeping II. 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

United states history. This course includes a thorough re- 
view of the history of the United States and is intended for students 
entering the One Year Elementary Course and the Two Year Ele- 
mentary Course. 

Civics. This study is intended to acquaint the student with the 
machinery of our government both local and national and thus pre- 
pare him to perform his part intelligently as a citizen of our country. 

Ancient history. A careful study of the Ancient Oriental 
Civilization in Western Asia and in Egypt. The history of Greece 
and Rome is comprised in this course. Stress is placed on the origin 
and growth of the institutions of civilization and the student is led to 
discover what essential elements these nations contributed to modern 
life. 

Modern history. The period covered by this course extends 
from the coming of Charlemagne, 800 A. D., to the present time. 
Special attention is given to the rise of the various powers of 
Europe, to the influences that shaped them and the relation they bear 
to the history of our country. 

American history. In this advanced course of history the 
student is led to see that the achievements in political, industrial, 
social and educational fields were gained by human activities rightly 
directed and that the responsibility of their maintenance in part rest c 
on him, also to realize the importance of our relation with world 
nations. Information from sources other than the text book is re- 
quired. Students entering this course must have had Ancient 
History. 

Civil government. A fuller course is here presented in the 
study of the constitutioanl history of the United States from its be- 




Company A 




Company B 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 57 

ginning to the present time. It includes a study of the growth of our 
national government and the government of the township, county, 
city and state. The student is impressed with the necessity of a 
knowledge of this subject that he may become a useful citizen. 
Special work is required in comparing our government with other 
governments of the world. 

DRAWING AND FINE ARTS 

The department offers thorough instruction in fine and dec- 
orative arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the third floor of 
Carnegie Hall, and there is ample equipment of casts and studio fur- 
nishings. The department aims to give thorough instruction in the 
principles of drawing and painting ; to enlarge the student's acquain- 
tance with what is best in art ; to offer courses of instruction adapted 
to the needs of teachers in the public schools and supervisors of art 
instruction in city schools. With serious study a high degree of 
efficiency and technical knowledge may be attained here at much less 
expense than would be incurred for similar instruction in a large 
city. 

Not "art for art's sake," but art for the enrichment of life is the 
conception held here. Artistic taste and appreciation of the beautiful 
are needed in the humblest and busiest life. Especial emphasis is 
placed upon the application of the principles of fine arts to the en- 
vironment of the every day life. 

Fine arts. A general course in appreciation and combining the 
essentials in drawing, painting and composition. A study of form 
using different media — charcoal, pencil, water color and oil. Still 
life and flower painting in water color. Study of composition by 
using flowers and landscapes. Figure sketching, advanced composi- 
tion and illustration in charcoal, water color and china painting. 

Normal art. Study of form by use of charcoal, pencil and 
color; color theory; hue, intensity and textile values; relation of 
complementary colors, etc.; simple design problems based on public 
school work, illustrating the uses of the elements and principles of 
design. Landscape in black and white, study of values working from 
black and white up to five and seven tones ; figure sketching ; illus- 
trating. 



58 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Metal work. The problems given are considered in relation to 
each other in order to develop a general knowledge of sheet metal 
work. Processes include forming, sawing, filing and building by 
hard and soft soldering, riveting, etc., together with the study of the 
processes of repousee, etching and coloring. 

Pottery. The course begins with the building of hand-made 
pieces of different sizes and shapes ; the making of tiles together with 
decoration by relief and incised lines; building of pilaster models; 
casting of moulds and pouring and finishing of mould-made pieces. 
Students glaze and fire a part of their work. 

Handicrafts. In addition to the courses in metal work and 
pottery, students are offered work in the following crafts : Book- 
binding, cut and tooled leather work, advanced construction with 
tilo matting, raffia and reeds, stenciling, and block painting. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial 
School comprises instruction in piano, voice, chorus work, harmony, 
history of music, music theory and science of music. Special efforts 
are made to make clear to the students the importance of technical 
work and the study of touch, accentuation and tone coloring. This 
leads to an understanding of what it means to interpret music and a 
thorough conception of the art of expression and artistic execution. 
The main purpose of piano study is to enable the student to under- 
stand what music is; help him understand that music, like all other 
art, must touch the soul of man, or interpret the soul of man — and 
be an expression of character, personality and individuality. 

Preparatory. Course in hand culture; major scales; Byer's 
method for beginners, or Czerny Op. 599. 

First year. Elementary technic ; Loeschern Op. 65 ; Lichner 
Sonatinas, album of instructive and interesting pieces. 

Second year. Elementary technic continued; Loeschern Op. 
66; Heller Op. 47; albums of instructive and interesting pieces by 
the best composers. 

Junior year. Plaidy Technical Studies; Cramer Octave 
Studies; Heller Op. 47; Czerny School of Velocity Op. 299; Haydn 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog $g 

and Mozart Sonatas. Selections from Schumann, Grieg, Heller, 
Nevin and others. 

Senior year. Advanced technical work continued; Cramer 
Studies ; Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas ; Selections from Chopin, 
Schumann, Bach, Liszt, Rubenstein and other modern and classical 
composers. 

[ * VOCAL MUSIC 

The course in vocal music is designed to afford a thorough and 
comprehensive training in the elements ; to secure accuracy and 
rapidity in sight reading and singing ; to develop a taste for the best 
grades of music, and to prepare students to teach the subject sys- 
tematically in all grades of the public schools. 

Public school music. Designed to enable students to teach 
such principles of music as will apply in the several grades of the 
public schools. Instruction is given in time, tune, technique and the 
aesthetics of music. These subjects are exemplified in practice. Em- 
phasis is laid upon the elements, theory of scale formation, melodic 
construction, elements of notation and harmony. The student be- 
comes thoroughly familiar with the best in grade music. Daily 
throughout the year. 

Choral singing. Daily chorus practice for a brief period is 
given the entire school. This class is made up of the entire body of 
students and attendance is compulsory. Constant practice is had on 
such compositions as lie within the range and understanding of the 
pupils. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

By an act of the Legislature the State Normal-Industrial School 
is required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military 
Science and the company organized and drilled is subject to regular 
inspection by the Adjutant General of the State. In harmony with 
this provision young men are drilled regularly in the schools of the 
soldier, squad, platoon, company, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(i) Organization. The cadet battalion at present comprises, 
w r ith the commandant, one cadet captain, one cadet first lieutenant, 



£ Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

one cadet second lieutenant, five sergeants, one color sergeant, six 
corporals, and one artificer and cadets. A permanent company is 
maintained under the name of Company A. A company is organized 
during the second term composed principally of short course stu- 
dents. This is known as Company B. 

(2) Equipment. The State Normal and Industrial School is 
supplied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutrements ; a Winches- 
ter rifle for long range practice, Winder target rifles ; a large Atkins 
disappearing target; United States regulation rapiers, for fencing; 
sabers and belts for cadet officers ; silk battalion flag, United States 
regulation ammunition, consisting of cartridges for target practice, 
and blank cartridges for use in volley firing and skirmish drill. Ap- 
plication has been made to the Adjutant General, U. S. A., for the 
detail of a regular army officer and the issuance of modern arms and 
equipment. 

(3) Appointments and promotions. The officers and non- 
commissioned officers are selected from among those cadets who 
have been most studious, soldier-like and faithful in the performance 
of their duties and who have been most exemplary in their deport- 
ment. The commandant and the commissioned officers constitute 
the board of examiners for the appointment and promotion of pri- 
vates and non-commissioned officers. 

(4) Military diploma. Commissions and warrants are issued 
to the commissioned officers who are duly examined and deemed 
worthy of promotion, provided, however, that they have drilled at 
least one term as officers, have been promoted to higher rank, have 
received an average of not less than 75 per cent, and have partici- 
pated in at least one annual military contest. 

(5) Uniform. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn by all 
cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in courses re- 
quiring attendance for more than a single term. This uniform con- 
sists of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray color, modeled after 
the United States Military Academy uniform, and is made in two 
qualities costing, respectively, $10.85 an d $12.85. The uniform is 
tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, durable and economi- 
cal a suit as the student can obtain for this amount. It may be pur- 
chased at the school, at actual cost, or elsewhere, as the student 



1 1 T j*^ ^ 


:m'Wu% 


1 'if* ,* ;,- X .... »: • 1 



^4 FzVw in the Dining Room 




Section of Chemical Laboratory. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 61 

elects. Uniforms and gloves are worn at all regular drills and in- 
spections. 

(6) Attendance. Six terms of military drill are required of 
all boys, unless excused on account of physical disability. A physi- 
cian's certificate must accompany such excuse. The standing of each 
cadet is averaged at the close of each term. The chief items con- 
sidered in determining the grade are attendance, deportment and 
drill. Only those cadets whose average is above 75 per cent for tjie 
six terms will be exempt from attendance. 

(7) Annual military contest and prizes. An annual mili- 
tary contest in held at the close of the Winter Term. There are 
three events : Company Drill and Inspection ; Squad Drill ; Individual 
Contest Drill. For each drill at the annual military contest there are 
three judges selected by the President and Commandant. The squad 
receiving the highest percentage in contest drill is presented with a 
silk ribbon, suitably inscribed, which is attached to the battalion 
colors, and the members of the squad receive honorable mention in 
the catalogue. The squad receiving second mark is given honorable 
mention in the catalogue also. The prize for the best drilled man in 
the individual contest is a gold medal, for second best, a silver medal 
and for third a bronze medal. The individual contest is open to all 
cadets and non-commissioned officers of the battalion. All cadets 
who take part in the annual military contest must appear in full 
regulation uniform. 

In the 19 14 contest there were five medals awarded in the Indi- 
vidual Contest, as follows : 

Battalion Prize, a gold medal Corporal Emil Weist 

First Prize, Co. A., a silver medal Corporal Emil Weist 

First Prize, Co. B., a silver medal Sergeant Oliver Halsted 

Second Prize, Co. A., a bronze medal—. Corporal Walter DeLaHunt 

Second Prize, Co. B., a bronze medal Corporal Albert Heine 

In the squad contest the winners were as follows : 

First Place — Squad 2 of Co. A. 
Second Place — Squad 1 of Co. A. 

Squad 2 was composed of the following. Lieutenant Boyd 
(Commanding), Sergeant Crary, Sergeant Welcher, Corporal Thue, 



62 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Corporal Colwell, Musician Lee and Cadets Martin, Rehberg and 
Dunton. 

Squad I was composed of the following: Lieutenant Myers 
(Commanding), Corporal McMartin, and Cadets Callan, Kalbus, 
Saunders, Coleman, Geer, Brown and Hansen. 

Mr. Jay Harm was elected captain of Company A for the year 
I9i4-'i5. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The primary purpose of the State Normal and Industrial School 
is the harmonius development of the entire boy or girl. Athletics 
and sports have a place in the development of every normal person 
and receive proper encouragement and supervision. Physical train- 
ing is compulsory ; two periods per week for six terms. A physical 
examination is given each student taking gymnasium work and his 
greatest needs are determined by the use of cards and charts. These 
cards are kept on file, for reference, so that his improvement may be 
noted and weaknesses corrected. Each student must procure a gym- 
nasium suit of prescribed pattern and gymnasium shoes. 
Physical Training 

(a) For young men. Two periods per week of six terms; 6 
points credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnastics, 
both with and without apparatus ; free-hand exercises ; sports. Foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball and tennis are available in season. 

(b) For young women. Two periods per week for six terms ; 
6 points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises are 
similar to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bell and barbell train- 
ing, club swinging, marching, running, exercises with light appara- 
tus, etc. Basketball is given a fair share of the time. 

Essentials of physical training. Especially designed for 
students expecting to teach, and coach, athletics. Anatomy, physi- 
ology and hygiene will be taken up so as to give the student a prac- 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 63 

tical working basis for the course and show the necessity and benefits 
of physical training. The fundamental principles of the different 
branches of athletics will be considered ; selection, training and con- 
ditioning of athletes ; problems of temperament, climate, weather and 
traveling. Lectures, charts, demonstrations and note-book work. 



64 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



Roster of Students 



SENIOR CLASS 
NORMAL-MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 

Ralph Gerald Cartwright New Salem 

Walter Keyes DeLaHunt Willmar, Minnesota 

Thomas Clyde McCormick Soldiers Grove, Wis. 

Lloyd E. Myers Red Oak, Iowa 

Charles H. Stahl Ellendale 

NORMAL-HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

Ruth Hae Haas Ellendale 

Lillian Grace McGinnis Silver Leaf 

Blanche Nora Saunders i Ellendale 

Ethel Elizabeth Saunders Ellendale 

NORMAL COURSE 

Eva Zella Anderson., Fullerton 

Lucy Agatha Bowler Ellendale 

Caroline Canfield Fullerton 

Mary Jeanette Case Ellendale 

Florence Cortrite Monango 

Mildred Idora Crabtree Ellendale 

Augustina Henrietta Dobler Kulm 

Mabel Blanche Geer Ellendale 

Marie Frances Guldborg Ellendale 

Martha Kalbus Ellendale 

Thoralf Koppang Edmore 

Esther Addie McMartin ....Ellendale 

Katherine Deveraux Pollock Ellendale 

Laura May Randall Ludden 

Edna Belle Smith Ellendale 

Clara Johanne Stafsburg Jud 

Edna Josephine Stafsburg Jud 

'Mabel Stafsburg Jud 

Linvill C. Townsend Ellendale 

Winnie Inez Wagner Guelph 

MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 

Charles LaFayette Halsted, Jr Forbes 

Oliver Stanley Halsted Forbes 

Silas Alison McCulloch Edgeley 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 65 

HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

Charlotte Pearle Carr Sheldon 

Alice Vera Higgs Ellendale 

Edythe Mae Merchant Ellendale 

Irene Marie Webb Ellendale 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 

Maude Marion Holte Ellendale 

Claud Arthur Lawhead Taylor 

Daniel M. McDonald Ellendale 

H. Preston Porter Ellendale 

Laura Estelle Potter : Ellendale 

Frances Lenore Walker Ellendale 

Frances Marian Walton Ellendale 

JUNIORS 

Abraham, Francis Leon Ellendale 

Baker, Frances Katherine Hazelton 

Barnes, Bertha May Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clara Josephine Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clarence Edwin Ellendale 

Boom, Frances Leota Ellendale 

Brown, William Floyd Ellendale 

Callan, Frank Ellendale 

Campbell, Bessie Ellendale 

Carpenter, John Joseph Cogswell 

Conner, Irma Lucille Rhame 

Dawe, John Fuller ton 

Dunton, Mauriel Milten Ellendale 

Eichinger, Sceone Estella Brussels, Wis. 

Fleming, Marion Agnes Ellendale 

Gamble, Richard John Rush City, Minn. 

Gamble. William Ashton Rush City, Minn. 

Flarm, Jay Alvin Ellendale 

Harm, Pearl Ellendale 

Hess, Clara Rosina Monroe, Wis. 

Hill, Myrtle Anna Ellendale 

Hollan, Emma Kulm 

Howard, Nellie Ellendale 

Keagle, Beatrice Harriet IVinship, S. D. 

Kellogg, Joycelyn Lane Ellendale 

Knox, Bertha Viola Monango 

Koppang, Harold Edmore 

Kosel, John Forbes 

McCormick, Donald John Soldiers Grove, Wis. 

McGraw, Emmet Francis Cogswell 



66 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

NoG«s, Lulu Marie Ellendale 

Peterson, Ada Rutland 

Porter, Hector Ellendale 

Randall, Hazel Evelyn Ellendale 

Saunders, Walter LaFayette Ellendale 

Schaller, Elizabeth Ellendale 

Schrader, Vera Lauretta Ludden 

Smith, Dorothy Agnes Mae Ellendale 

Sullivan, Olive May Ellendale 

Thompson, Fred E air dale 

Thue, Christian Howard... Horace 

Turnham, Frances Ludden 

Wilson, Katherine Elizabeth Oconomowoc, Wis. 

Wilson, Mariam E Roscoe, S. D. 

Wyckoff, Marguerite Katherine Monango 

Young, Mabel Ellendale 

Zimmerman, Benetta Elizabeth Noonan 

THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Colwell, Mabel F Monango 

Colwell, Robin 1 Monango 

Everson, Mabel Washburn 

Fleming, Stanley J Ellendale 

Halpenny, Vivian Louise Ellendale 

Harvey, Dorothy Ellendale 

Haskins, Edward George Ellendale 

Hatfield, Edna Eullerton 

Kalbus, Elsie Ellendale 

Laughlin, Lola Mary Monango 

Levertv. Agnes Ellendale 

McCullock. William Edgeley 

Meachen, J. Leonard* Ellendale 

Nichols. Harry R Eullerton 

Potter, Robert D Ellendale 

Rehberg, Paul H Ellendale 

St. Ores, Alita Ellendale 

Schnell, Harry A Edgeley 

Strutz. Arthur George Oakes 

W'attula, Hillia..: Ludden 

Welcher, Eber PRendale 

Wilson, Helen ^Lonango 

Zieman, Harold H Oakes 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 

Ackerman, Fred JVishek 

Ashley, Jay Brampton 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 67 

Ayres, Gladys Elizabeth Frederick, S. D. 

Barnes, Belva M Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Mildred Viola - Ellendale 

Bohling, Sarah May Ellendale 

Burkhardt, Mary Guelph 

Callan, Carrie Ellendale 

Coleman, Preston Ellendale 

Cook, Angelina Marguerite - Ellendale 

Deane, Dorothy Monango 

DeSart, Anna R DeSart 

Farrell, Neil Charles Lisbon 

Geer, Clayton Ellendale 

Hatfield, Jane Gertrude - Fullerton 

Hay, Ruth Geraldine Revillo, S. D. 

Hermansen, Lena Ellendale 

Hill, Hervey Ellendale 

Johnson, Clarence Ellendale 

Johnson, Stanley Clyde Ellendale 

Joseph, E. Pearl Ellendale 

Joyner, Audrey Ellendale 

Kalbus, Fred W Ellendale 

Kellogg, Paul Ellendale 

Lee, Thomas Cayuga 

Lynde, Llewellyn Ellendale 

Lynde, Orrin Ellendale 

Magoffin, Fannie Monango 

Miller, Aida Dewey Ellendale 

Mock, Maud Florence Ellendale 

Peek, Herbert Charles Ellendale 

Pierce, Raymond Ellendale 

Rost, Ellen C Kulm 

Rost, Mae Kulm 

Shimmin, Charles Forbes 

Sween, Julia Bessie Straubville 

Thrams, Everett '. Bismarck 

Wagner, Ruth Arline Guelph 

Walz, Fred Ashley 

White, Bernice Ellendale 

Williams, Beulah lone Ellendale 

Wilson, Vernie Ellendale 

Withee, Hazel Irene Guelph 

Zieman, Gertrude Oakes 

Zieman, Gladys Oakes 

Zimmerman, Gladys Mabelle Noonan 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 
Anderson, HatMe S Forbes 



68 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Arndt, Helga - Fullerton 

Backman, Esther Frederick 

Baldwin, Dorsey D Ludden 

Bliss, Max C Guelph 

Bliss, Rex H .....Guelph 

Bowers, Virgil Frank Bainbridge, Ohio 

Brown, George B Ellendale 

Coleman, Bessie Ellendale 

Coleman, Helen Ellendale 

Cooper, Gladys M Brampton 

Courtney, Everett Guelph 

Crandall, Ethel Frances Ellendale 

Crandall, Fern Hazel ..Ellendale 

Doan, Elva Jeane Brittin 

Erbes, Russell G IV heal on, Minn. 

Erdelt, Agnes H Ellendale 

Evans, Martha Ellendale 

Ferree, Myrtle Ellendale 

Frederickson, George Frederick Horace 

Gamble, Harold Longville, Minn. 

Giese, Otto J Larimore 

Graham, Gladys G Ellendale 

Guyott, Clara Oakes 

Hall, Faye Monango 

Hanhela, Elizabeth Straubville 

Hansen, Christine Oakes 

Hatfield, Oscar Fullerton 

Heine, Henrietta Ellendale 

Hermansen, Anna Ellendale 

Johansen, Agnes Ellendale 

Johnson, William Stanton Ellendale 

Joyner, Albert Ewart Ellendale 

Kosel, Christina Forbes 

Kronschnabel, Emily Frederick, S. D. 

Layman, Lucile Brampton 

Legge, George Andrew Spiritwood 

Leverty, Patrick Archie Ellendale 

Martin, Grandon Ellendale 

Mattson, Helma Frederick 

Mattson, Jacob E Frederick 

McGinnis, Lucile Silver Leaf 

McMartin, Leonard M Ellendale 

McMaster, Carl Leslie Forbes 

McMillin, Beulah Manson, Iozva 

Miller, Alvin Ellendale 

Minard, Minnie Silver Leaf 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 69 

Mock, Lester E Forbes 

Nelson, Esther L Marlow, S. D. 

Ogren, Engla Kulm 

Pease, Herbert Stirum 

Pease, LeRoy Stirum 

Pederson, Fritz B Oakes 

Pfaff, Alvina Louise Underwood 

PfalT, Gladys Luella Underwood 

Porter, Jacob Benjamin Ellendale 

Quatier, Helen Napoleon 

Riggin, Lillian Steele 

Rosenthal, Lawrence ...Ellendale 

Saner, Edwin Hazelton 

Smith, Ethel May : Ellendale 

Spencer, Marcus Ellendale 

Swanson, Ellen Havana 

Thomson, Agnes Edmunds 

Townsend, George Frater Ludden 

VanMeter, Harry George Hecla, S. D. 

VanMeter, Thomas Cooper Hecla, S. D. 

Weist, Martha Lillian Ellendale 

Welcher, Donna Mearie Ellendale 

Wentzel, Helen Ellendale 

Williams, Lewis E Ellendale 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Axtell, Grace M Ellendale 

Barnes, Howard H Ellendale 

Billey, Esther Gustava Ellendale 

Billey, Henna Helen Ellendale 

Boyd, Joseph Ellendale 

Brooks, Ida Leone Aberdeen, S. D. 

Coleman, Lelah Ellendale 

Crary, Charles Ellendale 

Crary, Hazel Vern Ellendale 

Doerheim, Emanuel Lehr 

Eiden, William A Ellendale 

Gruenig, Jacob Buffalo Gap, S. D. 

Higgs, Archie Ellendale 

Hitchcock, Byron E Glemvood, Minn. 

Hornbeck, Bulia Emily Montevideo, Minn. 

Jehle, Charles A Pana, Illinois 

Johnson, Levi Dougall Ayr 

Johnson, M. Louise St. Charles, Minn. 

Judkins, Francis Glenwood, Minn. 

Kast, Katharina K JFullerton 



y Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

King, Mrs. Stella Ellendale 

Loveless, Myrtle Viola Ree Heights, S. D. 

Lyons, Mabel Ellendale 

Morgan, Josie Ellendale 

Morrow, LaRhea '. Ellendale 

Olson, Mrs. Ruperta Perdetta Newark, S. D. 

Ravenscroft, Lucille Wessington, S. D. 

Rosenthal, Arthur C Ellendale 

St. Ores, Rozella ..Ellendale 

Schuchard, Henry John Napoleon 

Shimmin, Ellen Jane Forbes 

Stafsburg, Alma Jud 

Vandanacker, James C Chicago, Illinois 

Walker, Mrs. R. H Ellendale 

Walker, Robert G Ellendale 

VVeist, Emil Ellendale 

SHORT COURSE STUDENTS 

Aanerud, Harry W Forbes 

Alderin, Andrew Fort Clark 

Alderin, Harold Deapolis 

Arntson, Peter Mathias Sheldon 

Babitzke, Simon Ashley 

Baker, A. Joseph Hazelton 

Bergquist, Mae C Washburn 

Billey, Leino H Ellendale 

Bogue, Lynis Ellendale 

Bowers, Joe Bainbridge, Ohio 

Brakke, Clarence Levi Havana 

Brakke, Harold ....Havana 

Brazda, John Peter Fort Clark 

Brome, Gary H Chicago, III. 

Brooks, Leo.. Cogswell 

Buen, William Havana 

Campbell, Raymond Ashley 

Caron, Archie Scranton 

Chesbro, Laken Ellendale 

Christopher, Bertha Forman 

Cooper, Lance Newark, S. D. 

Degner, Charles Lewis Cogswell 

Eldredge, Glenn L Gascoyne 

Erickson, Anthony H Wilton 

Erickson, Arthur McG Wilton 

Gorman, Mabel Ellendale 

Grauman, Albert Harvey 

Hahn, Bertha _ Turtle Lake 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 71 

Hansen, Edward Cogswell 

Hanson, Bert O Fullerton 

Heine, Albert C Ellendale 

Heine, Carl August Ellendale 

Hermansen, Herman Arthur Forbes 

Herrmann, Amelia Monango 

Hille, Selma Kulm 

Hinsz, Charles Ashley 

Jarvi, Jacob Frederick 

Jones, Hobart Ellendale 

Juberg, Junis Arthur Melvin LaMoure 

Kalberer, John Benjamin Hazelton 

Kalbus, Alfred A Ellendale 

Kelsh, George Leopold Fullerton 

Kempf, Mike Ashley 

Kulm, John Eureka, S. D. 

Ladner, Edward Eureka, S. D. 

Larson, Anna Oakes 

Larson, Annie Oakes 

Larson, Jennie Oakes 

Lucke, Richard Fullerton 

Madison, Gladys Evelyn Kulm 

Mann, John Robert Jr [Underwood 

Mayer, Peter H Streeter 

Melroe, Oscar Cogswell 

Moeckel, Paul Fred Wishek 

Morrow, Eldred Vernon... Ellendale 

Nelson, Fred William Fullerton 

Noess, Herman Ernst Ellendale 

Norton, William Claude Ellendale 

Ogren, Singa Kulm 

Olson, Herman Tower City 

Orn, Clara Crete 

Paulson, Alma White Rock, S. D. 

Peterson, Marion Henrietta Marion 

Pudwill, Benjamin Danzig 

Pudwill, Paul, Jr Danzig 

Ouatier, Emma Napoleon 

Sando, Sophia Helen Cavalier 

Schaller, Fred H Ellendale 

Scheuffele, Christian F Lang Lake, S. D. 

Schulte, William Newark, S. D. 

Schulz, Martha Matilda Edgeley 

Silseth, Anton ..Rutland 

Sparks, Hilda M Fraddock 

Steele, Walter Berlin 



72 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Strand, Arthur Harold Forbes 

Strand, Selma Forbes 

Swanson, Clara Oakes 

Taylor, G. B., Jr Newark, S. D. 

Vroman, Royce A Edgeley 

Wheeler, Wilbur Thomas IVessington Springs, S. D. 

Wiitala, Lillian Hecla,S. D. 

SUMMARY 

Senior Class 43 

Junior Class 47 

Third Year Class 23 

Second Year Class 46 

First Year Class 71 

Short Course Students 81 

Special Students 36 

Grand Total 347 



NORTH DAKOTA 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 

Ellendale. North Dakota 




UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AUG I 7 1915 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 



Catalog Number 

June, 1915 



JAMESTOWN CAPITAL 




3 



6 
o 

R 

o 

w 
e 

o 






o 



CATALOG NUMBER 



North Dakota State Normal 

and 

Industrial School 




JUNE, 1915 
Vol. 10 No. 3 



Published Quarterly by tlie 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North. Dakota 
Entered August 8, 1907, at Ellendale, No. Dak., under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



CALENDAR 



1915 



Fall Term, Thirteen Weeks 

Registration, Monday, September 20, and Tuesday, September 21 
Class Work Begins, Wednesday, September 22 

Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., and Faculty Reception, 

Saturday Evening, September 25 
Thanksgiving Holiday, Thursday, November 25 

Fall Term Ends, Friday Evening, December 17 

1916 

Winter Term, Twelve Weeks 

Registration, Monday, January 3 and Tuesday, January 4 

Class Work Begins Wednesday, January 5 

Reception to Short Course Students, Saturday Evening, January 8 
Annual Military Contest, Thursday, March 23 

Cadet Reception and Banquet, Friday, March 24 

Winter Term Ends, Friday Evening, March 24 



Spring Term, Eleven Weeks 



Registration of New Students, 
Class Work Begins, 
Annual Oratorical Contest, 
Field Day and May Fete, 
Junior-Senior Reception, 
Baccalaureate Address, 
Annual Declamatory Contest, 
Annual School Concert, 
Senior Class Play, 
Commencement, 10:30 A. M., 
President's Reception, 
Alumni Reception, 



Monday, March 27 

Tuesday, March 28 

Tuesday Evening, May 16 

Saturday, May 20 

Saturday, June 3 

Sunday, June 4 

Monday, June 5 

Tuesday, June 6 

Wednesday, June 7 

Thursday, June 8 

Thursday, June 8 

Fridav, June 9 



Summer Term, Six Weeks 



Registration, 
Work Begins, 
Summer Term Ends, 



Monday, June 12 

Tuesday, June 13 

Friday Evening, July 21 



'I am among you as he that serveth/ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

HON. C. E. HODGE, President, Jamestown 

HON. D. E. GEEK, Ellendale 

HON. H. K. PENNINGTON, Milnor 

HON. F. B. OAKLET, Edgeley 

HON. FRED SLETVOLD, Oakes 

FRED W. BLUMEE, Accounting Officer, Ellendale 



STATE BOARD OF REGENTS 

(Effective July 1, 1915) 

L. F. CEAWFOED, Sentinel Butte 
A. D. TAYLOE, Grand Forks 
FRANK WHITE, Valley City 
EMIL SCOW, Bowman 
J. A. POWEE, Power 



FACULTY 

R. M. BLACK. A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895; A. M., 
1910: Graduate student, University of Chicago; Professor in 
Red River Valley University, 1895-97, 1899-1903; Superin- 
tendent of Wahpeton City Schools, 1903-5, County Superintend- 
ent of Richland County, 1905-9; Professor of History and Po- 
litical Science, State School of Science, 1909-14; State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1914. 

President 

E. W. ACKERT. Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899 ; 
B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901; A. B., Drake University, 1907; 
Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State Normal and Indus- 
trial School, 1907. 

Mathematics 

W. G. BOWERS. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1905; A. M., Indiana State University, 
1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, 1903-5; Principal of Schools, Leesburg, O., 1905-6; 
Instructor in Science, Indiana Normal, 1906-7; State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1907. 

Physical Science 

CARRIE TUTTLE, A. B., Wittenberg College; Student in Library 
Economy, Chicago University. State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1907. 

Librarian 

GABRIELLA C. BRENDEMUHL. A. B., Carleton College, 1905; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Teacher of German and Preceptress, Roches- 
ter Academy, 1905-08; High School Assistant Principal, 1908- 
10; State Normal and Industrial School, 1910. 

German 

ROSE W. EATON. B. L. University of Minnesota; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Instructor Minnesota High Schools, ten years; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1911. 

Latin 



J. E. SWETLAND. A. B., Bipon College. All Wisconsin fullback 
(football) four seasons; All Wisconsin guard (basketball). 
Holds college records in hurdles, shot, discus and hammer; In- 
structor and coach Grand Eapids and Eau Claire High School, 
1910-12; Eight years a member of Wisconsin National Guard; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1912. 

Athletic Director. 
Military Science 

BEATRICE OLSON. B. A., University of North Dakota; Phi Beta 
Cappa; Emerson College of Oratory, Boston. Principal of High 
School, Bugby, N. D. ; instructor English and Public Speaking, 
Fargo; N. D. State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Preceptress 

Head of English Department 

Public Speaking 

OLIN E. COMBELLICK. Graduate of Normal Department, Da- 
kota University; B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, 1907-1913; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1913. 

Director of Normal Department 

FLOYD C. HATHAWAY. B. S., South Dakota State College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts; student Parker College; stu- 
dent Minnesota School of Agriculture; graduate student Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin; State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Agriculture 

L. B. FIELDS. M. E., Purdue University, 1907; Assistant in Prac- 
tical Mechanics, Purdue University, 1905-07; Instructor in 
Mechanical Drawing and Pattern Making, Indiana Industrial 
School, 1907-10; Normal-Industrial School, 1910-12; Belling- 
ham, Washington City Schools, 1912-1915; State Normal Indus- 
trial School, 1915. 

Director of Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 

TILDA P. NATWICK. Valley City Normal School; Stevens Point, 
Wisconsin Normal School; Principal of Schools, Embarrass, 
Wis., four years; Teacher Domestic Science, Minto, N. D., 1911- 
1913. Domestic Science Jamestown, N. D., City Schools, 1913- 
1915. State Normal-Industrial School, 1915. 

Home Economics 



GEETEUDE GIBBENS. B. S., North Dakota Agricultural Col- 
lege. State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Home Economics 



JENNIE J. HAENSBEBGEE. Graduate Wisconsin State Normal 
School; Teachers' Course, Art Institute, Chicago; Crafts- 
Handicraft Guild, Minneapolis. Supervisor of Drawing, Albert 
Lea, Minnesota, 1906-12. Art student, Chicago, 1912-13. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

Drawing 
Fine Arts 

ALPHA HOLTE. State Normal-Industrial School, 1908. Graduate 
Columbia School of Music, Chicago, 1910. Supervisor of Music 
in the city schools of Montrose, Colorado, 1910-1913 ; Teacher 
of Voice in Western Slope Conservatory of Music, Montrose, 1910- 
12; Student of Harmony under Eossitter Cole and special stu- 
dent in the Garst Vocal Studies in Voice Building and Interpre- 
tation, 1913-14; State Normal-Industrial School, 1914. 

Vocal Music. 



JESSIE HOWELL. Student St. Mary's Hall, Faribault, Minnesota. 
Piano teacher State Normal-Industrial School, 1909-11; stu- 
dent Cosmopolitan School of Music and Dramatic Art, Chicago, 
Concert training in Berlin, 1910-12. State Normal-Industrial 
School, 1914. 

Piano 

HEEBEET BEOWN. Dakota Wesleyan University. University of 
South Dakota. Principal City Schools, Lennox, South Dakota; 
Principal City Schools, Harrisburg, S. D. ; Principal City 
Schools, Napoleon, N. D., 1909-1911. County Superintendent of 
Logan County, 1911-1915. State Normal-Industrial School, 1915. 

History and Education 

WALTEE M. DEWEY. Western State Normal School, Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, 1912. Special student, University of Wisconsin, 1913- 
1914 ; Supervisor of Manual Training, Norway, Michigan, 1912- 
1915. State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Cabinet Making 
Manual Training 



RUSSELL R. McCLURG. B. S., M. Accts. Muncie Normal Insti- 
tute, Muncie, Indiana, 1913; Indiana Public Schools, two years. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Commercial Arts. 

EDNA MAE HARRIS. B. A. University of Wisconsin, 1913. As- 
sistant Principal of High School, Bownman, N. D., 1913-1914. 
State Normal-Industrial School, 1914. 

Director of Girls' Physical Training 

EDWARD V. LEGLER. B. S., South Dakota State College. (Win- 
ter term, 1914). 

Short Course Engineering. 

MOLLIE C. MERKLEIN. Graduate of the Milwaukee Normal 
School, Kindergarten Department; Wausau Kindergarten Train- 
ing School. State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Primary Critic 

FANNY CRAWFORD. Salt City Business College, Hutchinson, 
Kansas, 1914. State Normal-Industrial School, 1914. 

Secretary to the President 
Registrar 

RUTH C. LEIBY. State Normal-Industrial School, 1913. 
"Assistant in Home Economics (1915) 

WILBUR T. WHEELER. Student State Normal-Industrial School. 
Assistant in Short Course Engineering 

HELEN WILSON. Student. State Normal-Industrial School. 
Assistant in Agriculture. 

FRED RITTMILLER. 

Assistant in BlacJcsmitliing 

MRS. ELLA DUNCAN. 

Matron. 

J. G. HATFIELD. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



General Information 



PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE SCHOOL 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was es- 
tablished by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with a 
section of the state constitution providing for its creation. The re- 
vised law of 1907 relating to this school reads as follows : 

"That the institution located at Ellendale, Dickey County, North 
Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial School, the 
object of such school being to provide instruction in a comprehen- 
sive way in wood and iron work and the various other branches of 
domestic economy as a co-ordinate branch of education, together with 
mathematics, drawing and the other school studies and to prepare 
teachers in the science of education and the art of teaching in the 
public schools with special reference to manual training." 

It is believed that with this broad but well defined mission the 
Normal and Industrial School offers superior advantages to the young 
people of the state. Educational thought of the day is constantly 
emphasizing more and more the practical and everyday duties and 
problems of life along with the processes of formal culture. This 
school is well located and abundantly equipped to give this many 
sided and full preparation for complete life. 

A cordial invitation to visit the school is extended to all persons 
who may be interested in school work, and especially to those engaged 
in educational work. The school will welcome inquiries concerning 
teachers trained in its different departments. There is a demand for 
such teachers and public school officials will find that it is the pur- 
pose of the administration of the school to place its graduates so that 
they will serve the state with credit to themselves and the interests 
involved. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the State Normal and Industrial School con- 
sists of five main buildings, a foundry, a demonstration farm and an 
athletic field. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 9 

DACOTAH HALL. This is a thoroughly modern three story 
brick building and is an unusually attractive home for young wom- 
en. The reception halls and society rooms are unusually pleasing. 
Here the young women of the school are surrounded by a stimulating 
and Christian influence. The purpose of the administration of the 
hall is to make it, not a boarding house, but a home, where every ef- 
fort may be put forth to maintain the amenities of life, which prevail 
in homes of influence, refinement and good cheer. It is believed that 
the social life which the hall offers is one of the most valuable parts 
of the student's education while here. The building is arranged to 
accommodate nearly one hundred students, and is modern through- 
out, having a complete equipment of bathrooms, toilet rooms, steam 
heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are well lighted and 
well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by the students them- 
selves. Each young lady intending to reside at the hall should bring 
at least three sheets, three pillow cases, blankets, towels, soap and 
napkins. Preference in choice of rooms is given in order of applica- 
tion. The health and comfort of the students are the first consider- 
ation and all matters relating to food, hygiene and sanitation are 
carefully observed. 

Living expenses, including board, room, light, heat, and use of 
laundry and bath rooms, are $14.00 per month of four weeks. Table 
board is $3.00 per week. This rate is exceedingly low, when one 
considers the completeness of the service offered. The school does 
not aim to pay all the cost of operating the hall from these receipts. 
The table board is excellent and the building is finely equipped. 
Single meals and meals to guests are 20 cents each. Bills are payable 
one month in advance. . No discount is made for absences of less than 
a week except in the case of the regular vacations, as indicated in the 
calendar. Students are required to take care of their own rooms. 
Mail is taken to the postoffice and delivered twice a day. 

CAEXEGIE HALL. This is a four story press brick structure, 
beautiful and commodious. In it are found the Normal Depart- 
ments, Departments of Science, English, Mathematics, Commercial 
Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the Library. In each de- 
partment the equipment is such that students may reap the most 
generous returns from their efforts. Physics, Chemistry, Biology 
and Physiography are taught in laboratories in the most approved 
manner; the Department of English has access to abundant liter- 
ature, the Commercial Department is provided with typewriters, 
duplicators, Edison dictation phonograph records, etc.; the Depart- 
ment of Music owns eight high grade pianos and supplements these 
with rented instruments; the Department of Fine Arts is equipped 
with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, lockers, 
kiln for burning china, etc.; the library is generously provided with 



10 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

fiction, history, biography, scientific works, reference texts, etc., is 
equipped with a cabinet finding list and Poole's Index, and is grad- 
ually accumulating bound volumes of the standard magazines. 

HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING. A three story red brick 
building houses the Department of Domestic Science and Art. The 
department occupies the entire upper floor, and the lower floor in. 
part, and is equipped with sewing machines, charts, lockers, tables, 
desks, cooking utensils, ranges, individual gas stoves and ovens. It 
also has the necessary demonstration table, dishes, silverware, linen, 
glass ware, etc., for a dining room. 

MECHANIC AETS BUILDING. This is a two story red brick 
structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The Departments of Mechanical 
Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the upper floor and are 
equipped with drafting benches, lathes, benches, individual and spe- 
cial tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the De- 
partment of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is equip- 
ped with engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, hack saw, 
grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas engines is equipped 
with a thirty-five-horse-power Ideal engine, a twenty-horse-power 
horizontal side crank Howell engine, a twenty-horse-power automatic 
gasoline engine, a Case traction engine, a Gaar- Scott dismounted 
traction engine, an International portable gas engine, a four-horse- 
power Eeliable gasoline engine, a Gray Marine Motor, a six-horse- 
power Freeport gasoline engine, calorimeters, Crosby steam engine 
indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction brake, water meter, injector, 
pumps, traps, boiler attachments, etc. 

ARMORY. This is a two story red brick building. The first 
floor is occupied by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down- 
draft forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor constitutes 
the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with dumb bells, 
Indian clubs, horizontal bars, traveling rings, spring board, vaulting 
horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physical training; and with 
shower baths and lockers. 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
buildings, has been reserved for a demonstration farm. One section 
has been fenced for cultivation. Each of the demonstration strips 
averages one-tenth of an acre in area and has been carefully culti- 
vated and valuable results have been obtained. 

ATHLETIC FIELD. The N-I Athletic Field is 288 ft. wide 
by 336 ft. long, enclosed, and in it are found the base-ball diamond, 
foot-ball field, out-door basket-ball field, rifle range and grand stand. 
Here are held the out-of-door meets and the target practice of Com- 
pany A. Three excellent tennis courts are maintained by a student- 
fa cultv tennis association. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 11 

ADMISSION 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral character 
who has completed the common school course and received a diploma 
will be admitted without examination. A preparatory course is main- 
tained for those students coming from schools not offering eighth 
grade work. Students incomplete in common school subjects must 
expect to make up work under special arrangement. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be 
admitted upon their credentials. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial depart- 
ments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice of parents 
and teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. This choice having 
been once made, no pupil will be permitted to change his course or 
to drop a subject except for the most important considerations and 
then only upon recommendation of the instructor and consent of 
the president. A student who voluntarily drops a subject without 
proper authority will be dropped from all classes until officially re- 
instated. 

CREDITS 

The unit of credit is a term's work in a subject, three units of 
credit constituting a year's work in a subject. No credit is given 
for less than a term's work. Credit for summer school work will be 
given under arrangements satisfactory to the departments concerned. 
Credits are given in terms of percentage, 75 per cent being the pass- 
ing grade except in spelling in which subject 90 per cent is the pass- 
ing grade. 

The letter "I" is used to indicate that work in a subject is in- 
complete and that a grade will be given when the required work is 
accomplished during the same or succeeding school year. The letter 
"C" is used to indicate that the work is so nearly up to a passing 
grade that the student may continue the subject and when the work 
in the subject is satisfactorily completed a passing grade will be 
given for the term's work that was conditioned. The letter "F" is 
used to indicate failure. The student will be dropped from the class 
upon receiving this mark and must take the work over again to re- 
ceive credit. 

In subjects requiring little or only occasional outside study, as 
shop work, cooking, etc., two periods of laboratory or recitation 
work are required daily to receive full credit. 

Excepting in the ten and one-half months' and two year Normal 
courses no student doing first year's work is permitted to take more 



12 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

than five credit subjects. In a subsequent year's work special faculty 
permission must be obtained to take more than five credit subjects. 
To obtain such permission the student must have demonstrated ex- 
ceptional scholarship in previous work and must show study periods 
of one hour for each subject. 

GYMNASTICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied young 
men in Military Drill to conform to the state requirements as set 
forth in Chapter 167 of the Session Laws of 1909 : 

"The State Normal and Industrial School is authorized and re- 
quired to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military Sci- 
ence, under such rules and regulations as the faculty of said institu- 
tion may prescribe." 

Two year's credit must be obtained by all able-bodied students in 
gymnastics. In special cases and for good reasons students may be 
excused from military drill or gymnastics by vote of the faculty upon 
petition. 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

An eighth grade graduate may earn an elementary second grade 
certificate in one year and one summer session or credits for an ele- 
mentary first grade certificate in two years. 

The holder of a good second grade certificate may earn credits 
for a first grade certificate (elementary) in one year or in two sum- 
mer sessions. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in one year's work beyond a four-year high 
school course, entitles the holder to a second grade professional state 
certificate for two years, and after nine months, successful experience 
in teaching, the holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade 
professional certificate valid for five years and renewable in the discre- 
tion of the State Board of Education which provides the foregoing 
regulations. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year normal 
course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a four-year high 
school course entitles the holder to a second grade professional cer- 
tificate for two years, and after nine months' successful experience in 
teaching, the holder of this diploma is entitled to a second grade pro- 
fessional certificate valid for life. 

Graduates from either the Mechanic Arts Course, Home Eco- 
nomics Course or Fine Arts Course are entitled to a Special Certifi- 
cate which entitles the holder to teach that special art in the schools 
of the state. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 13 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this 
school are admitted to the following institutions with the standing in- 
dicated : 

(1) STATE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. The 

State University of North Dakota, admits graduates upon their cre- 
dentials allowing full credit for courses completed and advanced stand- 
ing as follows: 

"(1) Students who have graduated from a four-year high 
school course and who have also graduated from a one-year profes- 
sional course in an accredited Normal School are allowed one year's 
credit (30 semester hours) on advanced standing. 

"(2) Graduates from the two-year North Dakota Normal 
Schools and Normal Schools having equal standing, who are also 
graduates of first-class high schools, will be granted 60 units of ad- 
vanced standing if they have completed all of the prescribed require- 
ments for admission, and provided the subjects offered for advanced 
standing are in harmony with the group requirements for graduation. 

"(3) Students who are not high school graduates but have 
completed the regular four-year or five-year normal course are given 
15 and 45 credits respectively on advanced standing, (including in 
either case 4 credits in Psychology and 12 in Education.)" 

(2) NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

The North Dakota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore year 
of its Agricultural and General Science Courses all graduates of this 
school. 

(3) ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. Grad- 
uates of the Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and 
Trigonometry are admitted to Armour Institute without examination 
and receive three years' credit in shop work. 

(4) MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping are admitted without 
examination. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are open 
to all students for competition : 

(1) PRIZE IN ORATORY. The State Normal Industrial 
School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in 
oratory under such rules as a committee of the faculty may prescribe. 



14 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

A silver medal is offered to the student who wins second place in 
oratory. 

(2) MILITAKY PKIZE. (First.) The State Normal and 
Industrial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins first 
place in individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, in 
1915 by Paul Eehberg. 

(3) MILITARY PRIZE. (Second.) A bronze medal offered 
by the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet winning sec- 
ond honors in the individual drill at the annual military contest. Won, 
in 1915, by LeRoy Pease. 

(4) DECLAMATORY PRIZE. The State Normal Industrial 
School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first place in 
declamation under such rules as the faculty may prescribe. A second 
prize of a silver medal is offered the student winning second place. 

(5) ORIGINAL STORY PRIZE. This prize, given by the 
State Normal Industrial School, is a gold medal and is awarded to 
the student who prepares the best original short story. A silver 
medal will be awarded the student who prepares the second best orig- 
inal short story. The stories winning first and second prizes shall 
become the property of the school. 

(6) ESSAY PRIZE. Mr. B. Rosenthal offers $10.00 in cash 
to the young man who writes the best essay on "Why the Man Who 
Pays His Debts is Better off Financially Than the One Who Does 
Not." Mr. Rosenthal requires that the subject be brought out as a 
business proposition rather than a moral one as the latter is taken 
for granted. 

(7) ESSAY PRIZE. Dr. M. F. Merchant offers $5.00 in cash 
to the student who writes the best essay on "The Cause of the Internal 
Troubles in Mexico." 

(8) PRIZE IN DOMESTIC ARTS. L. S. Jones and Com- 
pany offers $5.00 worth of merchandise, to be selected by the winner, 
to the young woman who does the best work in the making of a white 
waist. 

(9) PRIZE IN MECHANIC ARTS. N. H. Bjornstad Hard- 
ware Company offers a pocket knife to the young man who exhibits 
the best workmanship on a piece of furniture, to be no less complicated 
than a table or chair. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 15 

DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly conduct, 
and prompt obedience to lawful authority are imperative. Fortunate 
is the school in which the sentiment of the student body commends 
manly conduct. This is the type of discipline most desired at this 
school. In no sense is the State Normal-Industrial School a reform 
school and students who fail to yield a full and cheerful compliance 
to all requirements necessary for successful work and the honor of 
the school will be promptly dismissed. Discipline is educative when 
reasonable and intelligible. This is the guiding thought with which 
all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

The state of North Dakota makes a generous provision for the 
training of her young people at this school. No tuition fees are 
charged excepting as follows: A registration fee of fifty cents is 
collected of each student each term. A shop fee of fifty cents is re- 
quired of each term's work in Mechanic Arts, Home Economics, Fine 
Arts, Bookkeeping, Stenography or Typewriting. Special fees for 
private lessons in music are $12.00 for a term of twelve lessons. 
Piano rent is $1.00 per month. Eoom and board at Dacotah Hall is 
$3.50 per week payable, by the month, in advance. Good room and 
board may be had in private families at prices ranging from $4.00 
per week upwards. Many students rent rooms and board themselves. 
Board and room rent, the chief items of expense, range from $120 
to $150 per year of 36 weeks. 

The following deposit fees are required of those requiring the 
material, subject to return: Drawing set, $7.50; locker key, twen- 
ty-five cents; chemistry breakage, $1.00. 

i 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has been 
set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is open to all stu- 
dents until 4:30 o'clock school days. Arrangements are made by 
which students can draw books for use at times when the library is 
closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and cata- 
logued; a cabinet card catalogue; bound volumes of the leading mag- 
azines; Poole's index; congressional records, government reports and 
much other valuable material. New additions are constantly being 
made. Each department of the school has a well selected line of 
books for reference work. The leading magazines and newspapers 
are at the disposal of students. A trained librarian is in charge. 



16 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

vStudents who are unable to carry a regular program, may, upon 
recommendation of the classification committee, arrange for special 
work. All such students, however, must satisfy the committee that 
their preparation is sufficient to bring them properly within the en- 
trance requirements. No student deemed deficient in the fundamen- 
tals will be permitted to elect the arts exclusively, but a fair balance 
will be maintained between so-called intellectual and manual training 
subjects. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are three literary societies, one for young women and two 
for young men. The Alphian is the organization of the young wom- 
en, and the Sigma Pi Iota and Mechanic Arts Society those of the 
young men. 

Two glee clubs, the "Schubert" (young women) and the "Or- 
pheus" (young men) and a band are maintained. The course in 
music in public schools has been considerably enlarged and made 
more interesting and valuable to the student in reference to general 
education. Several recitals and concerts are given during the year. A 
half year credit in music may be earned by faithful glee club work. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A vol- 
untary organization which aims to promote Christian life among the 
young women of the school. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A branch 
of the Young Men's Christian Association is maintained under the 
management of the students. 

ATHLETICS. Foot-ball, basket-ball, base-ball and track athlet- 
ics are organized and games are played under supervision of the fac- 
ulty. A regular athletic director is employed, who has charge of 
all athletic activities. The coach and captains of the teams for 1914- 
15 are: 

J. E. Swetland Athletic Director 

Harry Nichols Captain of Foot-ball Team 

Joe Carpenter Captain of Basket-ball Team 

Captain of Base-ball Team 

ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

A splendid entertainment course is maintained by the school. 
For 1914-15 the following are some of the numbers chosen: Edmund 
Vance Cooke, The Von-Geltch-Basset Company, President Edwin 
Erie Sparks, The Bostonia Sextette, Professor Joseph Kennedy, Miss 
Nellie Peck Saunders and the North Dakota University Glee Club. 




t 

o 

'I 

o 

Q 

la 

o 
I 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 17 

A student rate of one dollar for a season ticket is made, the regular 
price of season tickets being two dollars and fifty cents. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

A joint summer school is maintained comprising the counties 
of Sargent, Emmons, Mcintosh, Logan and Dickey. A six weeks' 
session immediately following the regular school year is held. Stu- 
dents and teachers may take work and earn credits to be applied to- 
ward the completion of any course. A special summer school bulle- 
tin is published announcing the work of this session of the 
school. A copy may be obtained for the asking. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of the city take a deep interest in the 
students, many of whom are identified with their activities. Students, 
are urged to attend the church of their choice. Bible study classes cov- 
ering the state high school syllabus will be organized in the Metho- 
dist, Presbyterian, Catholic and Baptist Sunday Schools. These will 
be under competent leaders and students who successfully pursue the 
course may earn a half year's credit to be accepted as an elective in 
any course. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Study this catalogue thoroughly. 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Bring with you such text books as you may need. 

Write the president that you are coming. 

Come with a determination to make the school year the best year 
of your life. 

Bring a letter of recommendation from your pastor or teacher. 
This is not required but serves as a letter of introduction. 



18 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 
COURSES OF STUDY 



The following courses of study have been carefully arranged to 
comply with the laws of the state and the regulations of the state 
board of education. 

Unless otherwise specified all subjects require five recitations 
per week. Two laboratory or shop periods are required for one 
period of credit. 

RURAL ELEMENTARY NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a second grade elementary certificate 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Summer 


Eng. I. (Gram. 


) English I. 


English I. 


Language & 
Grammar 


Lit. of Grades 


Geography 


Geography 




Agriculture 


Agriculture 


Agriculture 


* Physiology 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Pen. & Spell. 


*Civics 


U. S. History 


U. S. History 


Pedagogy 




Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


*Two daily 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 


recitations. 



TWO YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a first grade elementary certificate 
FIRST YEAR. 



Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Lit. of Grades 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 


U. S. History 
Elective 


U. S. History 
Elective 


Pedagogy 
Elective 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. 
SECOND YEAR. 


Drill or Gym. 


English II. 
Algebra 


English II. 
Algebra 


English II. 
Algebra 


Ancient History 
Physiology 
Normal Grammar 


xincient History 
Botany 
Elem. Psych. 


Ancient History 

Civcis 

Elem. Psych. 


Drill or Gym. 


Drill or Gym. • 


Drill or Gym. 



Note. — The elective in the elementary normal courses must be 
chosen from the following: Public School Music, Drawing, Agri- 
culture, Manual Training, Home Economics. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



19 



FOUR YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (i/ 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (%) 

Drill or Gym. 



English II, 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Physiology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Normal Grammar 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR. 

Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (i/ 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (%) 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

THIRD Y^EAR. 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR. 

American History 
Psychology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Teaching. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
P. S. Music (i/ 2 ) 
P. S. Drawing (%) 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Civil Government 
Psychology 
School Admin. 
Obs. & Teaching. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



20 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

FIVE YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Lit. of Grades 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra- 
Ancient History 
Physiology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PL Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Normal Grammar 
Hist, of Ed. 
Latin I or German 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Psychology 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Lat. II or Germ. II 

Elective 
Elective 



FIRST YEAR. 

Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English III. 
PL Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR. 

American History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Prin. of Ed. 
Latin I or German I 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR. 

Psychology 
Obs. & Teaching 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Elective 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Botany 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PL Geom. 
Modern History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Political Science 
Rev. & Meth. 
School Admin. 
Latin I or German I 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Psychology 

Obs. & Teaching 

Lat. II or Germ. II 

Elective 

Elective 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



21 



ONE YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Normal Grammar 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 

Psychology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

Psychology 
School Admin. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



TWO YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR. 



Fall Term 

Psychology 

Normal Grammar 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 

Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Prin. of Ed. 

Obs. & Teaching. 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



School Admin. 

Obs. & Teaching. 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



In the two year normal course for high school graduates the 
major elective will determine the course from which the student re- 
ceives his diploma. 



22 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR. 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Physiology- 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Drawing 
Gymnasium 



English II. . 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Hand Sewing) 
Drafting) 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
PL Geom. 
Chemistry 
Normal Grammar 
The House) 
Cooking I.) 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Sp. Meth. 
Physics 
Hist, of Ed. 
Laundry ) 
Bacteriology) 
Cooking II. ) 
Gymnasium 



Psychology 

Adv. Ped. 

Adv. Chem. 

Design & ) 

Patterns ) 
Dressmaking) 



Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Drawing 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Garment) 
Making) 
Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR. 

English III. 
PL Geom. 
Chemistry 
Rev. and Meth. 
H. H. Managem't) 
Cooking I. ) 

Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR. 

American History 
Sp. Meth. 
Physics 
Prin. of Ed. 
Food Analysis) 
Basketry ) 

Gymnasium 
FIFTH YEAR. 

Psychology 
Obs. & Teaching 
Adv. Chem. 
Textiles ) 

Dressmaking) 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Pen. & Spell. 

Drawing 

Gymnasium 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 

Simple) 
Dressmaking) 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
PL Geom. 
Chemistry 
Rev. and Meth. 
Home Nursing) 
Cooking I.) 
Gymnasium 



Political Science 
Economics 
Physics 

School Admin. 
Food Analysis) 
Dietetics ) 

Sanitation ) 
Gymnasium 



Psychology 

Obs. & Teaching 

Adv. Chem. 

Millinery ) 

Arts Design) 
Dressmaking) 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 

FIRST YEAR. 



23 



Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Physiology 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Man. Tr. I. 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Man. Tr. I. 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Man. Tr. I. 


Drill. 


Drill. 
SECOND YEAR. 


Drill. 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 


English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 


Man. Tr. II. 


Man. Tr. II. 


Man. Tr. II. 


Drill 


Drill 


Drill 




THIRD YEAR. 




English III. 
PL Geom. 


English III. 
PI. Geom. 


English III. 
PL Geom. 


Physics 
Elective 


Physics 
Elective 


Physics 
Elective 


Man. Tr. III. 


Man. Tr. III. 


Man. Tr. III. 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 
FOURTH YEAR. 


Gymnasium 


American History 
Solid Geom. 


American History 
Solid Geom. (i/ 2 ) 


Civil Government 


Chemistry 
Normal Grammar 


Adv. Algebra (%) 

Chemistry 

Rev. and Meth. 


Adv. Algebra 
Chemistry 
Rev. and Meth. 


Man. Tr. IV. 


Man. Tr. IY. 


Man. Tr. IV. 


Gymnasium 


Gymnasium 
FIFTH YEAR. 


Gymnasium 


Ap. Mechanics 
Hist, of Ed. 


Pract. Teaching 
Prin. of Ed. 


Ap. Mechanics 
School Admin. 


Psychology 
Special Methods 
Man. Tr. V. 


Psychology 
Special Methods 
Man. Tr. Y. 


Psychology 
Special Methods 
Man. Tr. V. 



24 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



Fall Term 
Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Physiology 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill. 

English III. 

PL Geom. 

Physics 

Cost Keeping 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 

American History 
Solid Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 

Ap. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 
Mech. Arts V. 



MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 

FIRST YEAR. 

Winter Term 
English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 

SECOND YEAR. 
English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill. 

THIRD YEAR. 
English III. 
PL Geom. 
Physics 
Cost Keeping 
Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 
FOURTH YEAR. 
American History 
Solid Geom. (i/ 2 ) 
Adv. Algebra (%) 
Chemistry 
Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 
Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR. 
Engines 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 
Mech. Arts V. 



Spring Term 
English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts II. 
Drill. 

English III. 
PL Geom. 
Physics 
Cost Keeping 
Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 

Political Science 

Adv. Algebra 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 

Ap. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Elective 
Mech. Arts V. 



Electives: English IV, Latin or German, Fine Arts, Commer- 
cial Arts, Industrial Physics or Advanced Mechanic Arts (Mechanic 
Arts V), Music. 

Mechanic Arts V: One year's work selected from the follow- 
ing: Carpentry and Building, Building Construction, Joinery and 
Cabinet-Making, Concrete Construction, Electric Wiring, Machine 
Shop Practice, Interior Finishing and Painting, Engines, Black- 
smithing, Machine Drawing, Architectural Drawing, and Plumbing 
and Steam Fitting. 



■ ^=£r _~~ - ■ | 




■ ,;~~ '/ 


m 




it 




■ 


wmmms^^ tllMi ~ A —--~-~ i '' i '-^'i^amm^^^ 


ms-nl >:}$* 


? 




4 '. '". 




i 


^-" " 


fei 


-4 




1 1 /'/' / 




• 


H Hf:-: 






r IF 2 3B^ 


»,,.» y 




IfMfl :.,M 




11 

J - . 


ftp""*' 

IHmk 


n&fc 1 


'•;'•'".:'-' - ";~ 


1 ' 

« 




™,i . l.;J f ? • 


« 


; 


i Bi. 


! 


^ 


JBHWk 


{H ■■ 




jmg&~ mWl 








-if(vB» 


* T 




I 


} w 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



25 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Physiology 

Hand Sewing and 

Drafting 
Gymnasium 



English II. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 
Chemistry 
Cooking I. 

The House 
Gymnasium 



English III. 

Elective 

PL Geom. 

Physics 

Cooking II. 
Bacteriology 
Laundry Work 



FIEST YEAR. 

Winter Term 

English I. 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Geography 
Garment Making 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 
Chemistry 
Cooking I. House- 
hold Management 
Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR. 

English III. 
Elective 
PI. Geom. 
Physics 
Basketry 

Food Analysis 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Geography 

Simple) 
Dressmaking) 
Gymnasium 



English II. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 
Chemistry 
Cooking I. 

Home Nursing 
Gymnasium 



English III. 

Elective 

PL Geom. 

Physics 

Dietetics 

Food Analysis 
Sanitation 



English IV. 
American History 
Adv. Chemistry 
Elective 

Design & Patterns 
Dressmaking 



FOURTH YEAR. 

English IV. 
American History 
Adv. Chemistry 
Elective 
Textiles 

Dressmaking 



English IV. 

Political Science 

Adv. Chemistry 

Elective 

Millinery 
Dressmaking 
Arts Design 



26 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 
COMMERCIAL-ACADEMIC COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Typewriting I. 
Normal Arith. 
Penmanship and 

Spelling 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 



English II. 
Algebra 
Stenography II or 

Bookkeeping II 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 
Typewriting II or 

Elective 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Business English 
Elective 
Elective 



English III. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



FIRST YEAR. 

Winter Term 

English I. 
Typewriting I. 
Normal Arith. 
Penmanship and 

Spelling 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Algebra 
Stenography II or 

Bookkeeping II, 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 
Typewriting II or 

Elective 

THIRD YEAR. 

Geometry 
Ancient History 
Commercial Law 
Elective 
Elective 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English III. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Typewriting I. 
Comm. Arith. 
Penmanship and 

Spelling 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 



English II. 
Algebra 
Stengraphy II, or 

Bookkeeping II 
Stenography I or 

Bookkeeping I 
Typewriting II or 

Elective 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Business English 
Elective 
Elective 



English III. 
Civil Govt. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Students specializing in Stenography take Bookkeeping I, Sten- 
ography II, and Typewriting II. 

Those specializing in Bookkeeping take Stenography I, Type- 
writing I, and Bookkeeping II. 

Certain regulations have been adopted regarding the Commer- 
cial-Academic Course, with which the student must make himself 
familiar. An enrollment in these courses must be made by the Di- 
rector of the Commercial Department. 

Those wishing a special commercial course may make such se- 
lection of studies as to obtain a certificate of completion on approved 
demonstration of ability. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 



27 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Agriculture 
Latin I or Germ. I 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PL Geom. 

Chem. or Physics 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English IV. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Gvmnasium 



ACADEMIC COURSE 

FIRST YEAR. 

Winter Term 

English I. 
Agriculture 
Latin I or Germ. I 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR. 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Chem. or Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English IV. 
American History 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 



English I. 



Agriculture 
Latin I or Germ. I 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Chem. or Physics 
Elective 
Gvmnasium 



English IV. 
Political Science 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Description of Courses 



EDUCATION AND NORMAL COURSES 

ONE of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public 
school conditions as they are, is easily pursuaded that no 
other requirement relating to education is of such pressing impor- 
tance. The Act which defines the mission of the State Normal-In- 
dustrial School requires it to train teachers "in the science of educa- 
tion and the art of teaching in the public schools with special refer- 
ence to manual training." 

ELEMENTARY PEDAGOGY. A brief course in the princi- 
ples and methods of teaching and general school management offered 
to students who are unable to remain in school a sufficient length of 
time to complete a full course. This course includes a brief study 
of the presentative, representative and reflective powers; the ends of 
education ; the means ; the principles involved ; general methods ; meth- 
ods in particular branches, etc. 

PSYCHOLOGY. One year's work in psychology is given. The 
general characteristics and laws of mental life and the functions of 
the various mental processes are studied. A brief course in physio- 
logical psychology and a term's work in child study are also included. 

Two terms of elementary psychology are given in the two year 
Normal Course leading to a first grade elementary certificate. This 
work will be accepted in lieu of the first term's work in the course in 
psychology given in the senior year. 

HISTORY OF EDUCATION. A study of the educational sys- 
tems of the chief nations of antiquity; education in its relation to 
Christianity; the Renaissance, the Reformation and the forces opera- 
tive in our own era ; a study of the life and practices of the chief edu- 
cational reformers in the light, of prevailing theories. Numerous 
outside reading and class reviews are required. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 29 

PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION. A broad conception of the 
principles of education is here presented. Especial attention is given 
to such themes as the functions of teaching and of subject matter, mo- 
tivation, correlation, concentration, etc. The aim is to familiarize 
the student with such principles of education as will enable him to 
meet intelligently problems of class room instruction. A professional 
thesis is required of each one completing this course. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. This course is to consider 
problems of importance not ordinarily met in the class room instruc- 
tion. The relationship of officers, teachers, parents, and pupils as 
well as questions of organization and administration pertaining to 
the state law, course of study, daily programs, examinations, promo- 
tions and matters of discipline will be discussed. 

PRIMARY METHODS. A course designed especially for those 
who anticipate teaching in the primary grades. Industrial work 
story telling, phonetic reading, primary songs and number work is 
emphasized from the view point of daily plans. The work is prin- 
cipally lectures and students are required to make carefully written 
reports. 

ADVANCED PEDAGOGY. This is especially for Senior stu- 
dents who enroll for observation and teaching. It is designed to meet 
the problems peculiar to the observation and teaching work. 

LITERATURE IN THE GRADES. This consists of a careful 
study of some of the classics required by the state course of study for 
the grades. In this work the aim is to bring out not only the thought 
but also the beauty, form and manner of the presentation and make 
the prospective teacher familiar with the subject matter of reading. 

GEOGRAPHY. Two terms' work is required in Normal courses. 
This includes a review of descriptive and political geography with 
methods of teaching. Some study is also made of the elements of 
mathematical and physical geography. 

REVIEWS AND METHODS. The subject matter of arith- 
metic, grammar, history and geography reviewed; the principles and 
methods of teaching emphasized. The work is especially designed to 
train students to teach. The subject matter, teacher's aim, method, 
preparation and presentation are carefully considered with special ref- 
erence to the grades. 

OBSERVATION AND TEACHING. Designed to train pros- 
pective teachers in the principles and methods of effective teaching. 
The opportunity for observation and practice teaching is found in the 
classes of the preparatory department, the department of manual 
training, and the department of domestic science and arts. Both ob- 
servation and teaching take place under the direct supervision of a 



30 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

trained teacher, who is thoroughly capable not only of directing the 
efforts of pupil-teachers but of offering the most helpful and pains- 
taking criticism. 

MECHANIC ARTS 

The purpose is two-fold: 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity for 
specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 

Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this 
work; no other school in the state is so well equipped. The shops and 
laboratories are well supplied with every modern appliance which can 
aid in acquiring practical knowledge of industrial subjects. A visit 
will convince. 

Mechanic Arts I. 

1. JOINERY. 

a, Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, chisel, 
hammer, square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and other hand 
tools, in the construction of the principal joints employed in car- 
pentry and joinery. 

o. When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, useful 
articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the student. 

c. Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a desk, 
table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in order that they 
may make further application of the principles they have learned. 

d. Advanced cabinet making; practice in the application of the 
principles of joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, settees, 
stands, pedestals and cabinets of various designs. Pieces to be fin- 
ished in approved manner. 

2. ELEMENTARY CABINET MAKING. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instruments, 
with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

c. Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in mechanical 
drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of construction. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 31 

d. Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of planes 
in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive geometry, is 
the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. In connection 
with it students are required to bring to class shop sketches or free- 
hand working drawings of various articles. Instrumental drawings 
are made from some of these sketches. 

Mechanic Arts II. 

1. FORGING. 

a. Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming angles 
from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms of weld- 
ing iron and mild steel. 

b. This course includes a number of useful articles, including a 
bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, clevis, cold 
chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and hammer. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making and 
tempering machine tools. 

2. FOUNDRY PRACTICE. 

Molding and core work; melting and casting iron and brass; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices; the mixing of 
iron; the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting of brass 
and other soft metals. 

Students make all castings for Machine Shop Work. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 
a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

0. Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental drawings, 
made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

c. Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

Mechanic Arts III. 

1. TURNERY. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises through 
which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, concave 
curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow turning, together 
with exercises combining either a number, or all, of these operations. 

Useful articles in which the principles learned in (a) are ap- 
plied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for various tools, a 



32 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair balusters and var- 
ious other useful articles. This work is carried further in its appli- 
cation in pattern making. 

2. PATTERN MAKING. 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given to the 
work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made of a 
number of models which involve the more elementary problems in 
foundry practice ; these are followed by patterns of parts of machines, 
including a hand-wheel and blanks for a cam, gear-wheel and bevel- 
gear. 



4. MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

a. Sheet Metal Patterns. Graphical methods of solving prob- 
lems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their application m 
sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns of stovepipe 
elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All articles in this course 
of which patterns are made, are constructed either of metal or paper. 

0. Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story 
frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is made very 
practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the floor, base- 
ment and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sectional wall views 
showing the construction; and at least two views of the completed 
structure — the drawings including roof plan and longitudinal and 
lateral sections. Specifications are drawn up and an estimate of the 
cost of building materials and labor is made. Tracings and blue 
prints are made of the complete set of plans. Special students are 
carrying this work further and are actually building models in the 
shop, in which the methods of construction are identical with those 
used in actual house building. 

Mechanic Arts IV. 

1. CHIPPING AND FILING. 

a. Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill in 
the use of the file and the cold chisel. These tools are of especial 
value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for instance, in 
erecting and repairing machinery whether in the shop or on the farm. 
Their usefulness is so well known, and the inability of the average 
man to use them properly is also so well known, that it seems proper 
to give them especial attention in this course. 

b. In connection with and in addition to the above a number 
of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 







«h* # '' i^^^H 


• 


-,,,;<.■;. 


PR, . j§. 1- 


: -. " ; " }'■■ 


I""' 






wt : •"'"' 


Si 


Jr ' 


^l 


*''* 


I| 




1. * 


i 1 




■H ■■■■■f^^ 




1 




.■■■■:... ■ ' 


™ 




' m 


1 


tij&ttfrW 




. ' 








^P^MJEy-yJ 




***xmmm W 




r ^jy 


. ,' 1 




^n 


^ms 



3 
CQ 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 33 

2. MACHINE SHOP PEACTICE. 

a. Machine tool making. Students make and temper the tools 
which they will use in their Machine Tool Practice. 

b. Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms of 
machine tools, directions for operating machines and keeping tools 
in order ; practice in centering and in plain, taper, and template turn- 
ing, chucking, drilling, boring, external and internal thread cutting; 
hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

c. Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, micrometer and 
Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps and dies, ma- 
chine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In this course the ma- 
chine work is done on the articles cast in the foundry during the 
preceding year. The greater share of the machine tool practice of the 
entire course consists in machining the products of the foundry. 

d. Class to do the machining and erecting of a small engine, a 
lathe, or some other project involving similar operations. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Lettering and conventional representations of frequently re- 
curring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, etc. 

b. Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in projec- 
tion of complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct dimen- 
sions supplied from measurements. Sketches to be neat and clear 
and dimensions properly placed. 

c. Working drawings from sketches. Finished working draw- 
ings from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings to be inked, 
others to be traced and from the tracings blue prints malle. 

d. Machine design. Students to make original design of me- 
chanical appliance or machine. 

Mechanic Arts V. 

1. APPLIED MECHANICS. The object of this course is to 
provide students with a practical statement of the principles of Me- 
chanics essential to an intelligent interest in the constructive arts. 
It embraces a study of simple framed structures, strength of mate- 
rials, beams, riveted joints, shafts, springs, elementary mechanism, 
simple machines, and hydraulics. 

2. COST KEEPING. The object of this course is to provide 
the student with a method of determining the cost of construction, a 
study of time systems, and the elements of scientific management as 
applied to farm and factory work viewed from the standpoint of re- 
sults shown by cost keeping. 



34 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

3. ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

4. VOCATIONAL. For students taking Mechanic Arts Course. 

One year's work chosen from the following: Carpentry and 
building construction; joinery and cabinet making; concrete con- 
struction ; electric wiring ; painting, interior finishing and decorating ; 
orating; architectural drawing; machine drawing, blacksmithing ; 
machine shop practice; steam and gas engines. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student work 
done in this department. 

5. TEACHERS' MANUAL TRAINING. For students tak- 
ing Normal-Manual Training Course. 

(a) Hand-work for Primary Grades. 

1. PAPER AND CARDBOARD CONSTRUCTION. This 
work is taken up as it should be presented in the public schools. The 
different steps in paper folding are given, developing into the con- 
struction of familiar articles. The use of paste and scissors is devel- 
oped early in the course. Freehand cutting is given for training the 
eye in regard to form and for composition. Portfolios, booklets, 
boxes, etc., are constructed of heavy paper and cardboard. 

2. CLAY MODELLING AND POTTERY. Some training 
is given in modeling type forms from simple objects in nature. The 
greater share of the time is devoted to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces in- 
volving different methods of construction. In the third and fourth 
grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class is instructed in 
the craft of mould-made pieces and a few pieces are made by the 
class. Students glaze a part of their work. 

3. WEAVING AND BASKETRY. Weaving begins with the 
use of paper mats, different patterns being worked out in several 
media. The materials included are raffia, jute, common wool yarns 
and, for the fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of the finest quality. 
Problems include pencil bags, book bags, holders, mats, special de- 
signed rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. Basketry consists of the 
problems used in elementary grades, simple rattan mats and baskets, 
handles, hinges, etc. Coiled mats and simple baskets are executed 
and a few methods of using raffia and constructive work are illus- 
trated. 

4. THIN WOOD CONSTRUCTION. The assembling of 
thin pieces of wood by means of glue and braids to form miniature 
pieces of furniture; the construction of a miniature house. The work 
consists, in part, of a combination of wood and cardboard. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 35 

b. Woodivork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 

(1) WOODWORK FOE FOURTH AND FIFTH GRADES. 

The purpose here is to train the prospective teacher in the simpler 
processes in wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction in- 
tended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, they 
are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, for orig- 
inal design. The work is similar in character to courses offered in 
the elementary grades of any first class public school system. The 
tools used are the knife, block plane, back saw, coping saw, chisel, 
bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, hammer, rule and pen- 
cil. For most of the exercises the material is prepared in thickness 
before being given to the student. Workmanlike methods are aimed 
at; blue prints of the course are made. 

(2) WOODWORK FOR THE SIXTH, SEVENTH AND 
EIGHTH GRADES. Here serious attention is first given to fol- 
lowing the methods of the skilled mechanic. It is the aim to keep 
always in mind the interest and capacity of the pupils being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the public 
schools where there is an equipment of workbenches and a rather 
full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth grades there are nu- 
merous exercises in cabinet making in which the simpler methods of 
joinery are involved. The use of sandpaper, filer, stains and varnish 
is introduced in finishing some of the pieces. 

c. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full Me- 
chanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive exercises 
in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construction, Wood" Carv- 
ing, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and Design. 

(1) MANUAL TRAINING DESIGN. Study of the ele- 
ments of design, line, dark and light and color and the application 
of the principles of harmony. The object of the instruction is to 
develop appreciation through the study of art-structure. The course 
begins with design in the abstract, harmonious arrangement of spaces 
being given special attention.. Application of the theory of design in 
technical problems; designs for furniture; textiles, wall coverings, 
stained glass, interiors, etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 

Short Course in Farm Engineering. {Two Years.) 

This course in planned to meet the most practical requirements 
of young men on the up-to-date farm. A certificate a proficiency 
will be given upon a satisfactory completion of the work. The 
course includes the following subjects : 



36 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

I INDUSTRIAL ARITHMETIC— The work will involve 
factors, fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, practical measure- 
ments, etc. Problems dealing with such subjects as marketing, meas- 
urements of walls, crops, cost of fences, buildings, silos, ration, and 
commercial paper will receive special attention. 

II AGRICULTURE— An elementary study of the different 
kinds of soils, soil and water, the germination of seeds, requirements 
in the growth of seedlings, conservation of moisture, soil fertility, 
rotation of crops, varieties of stock and stock breeding. 

III CARPENTRY— Care and use of tools, forms of joints em- 
ployed in making articles for home and farm use, timber splices used 
in the construction of buildings, trusses and other forms of framing 
as related to farm buildings, methods of fencing, construction of a 
model of the whole or part of a building. 

IV BLACKSMITHING— Care of the forge fire, drawing, 
bending, upsetting, swaging, and the different forms of welding of 
iron and steel, including the laying of plow shares, the tempering of 
steel, and the application of the foregoing processes in the making of 
articles for farm use. 

V MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE— Time will be devoted to 
work in the Machine Shop. Each student will have practice in shap- 
ing and setting tools and in the manipulation of modern metal work- 
ing machines. 

VI ENGINES— A study of the different types of steam en- 
gines, single, double, simple and compound; advantages and disad- 
vantages of each. The steam valve, its motion and the different 
mechanisms by which the motion is obtained. A thorough study of the 
hydrostatic and mechanical methods of supplying lubrication. The 
indicator as a means of studying pressure, correct valve setting; the 
tests for both indicated and brake horse power. The study of the 
different forms of governors, weights, springs and dash-pots. 

VII BOILERS — The study of the more common types of boil- 
ers, safety devices, feed pumps, feed water heaters and injectors, boil- 
er testing, boiler repairs and boiler compounds. Boiler practice. 

VIII GAS ENGINES— Principles, types and regulating de- 
vices; methods of ignition. In this course special attention will be 
given to the adjustment of working parts. Gas Engine practice. 

IX POWER TRANSMISSION— The various methods em- 
ployed in the transmission of power and the application of the more 
common types; shaftings and bearings; babbitting; couplings; pul- 
leys; tooth and friction gears; clutches; rope and chain drives; belts 
and belting; splicing and lacing; practical problems in figuring the 




J 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 37 

size and speed of pulleys for required conditions of work, belt slip- 
page and preventative. 

The course is arranged as follows: 

FIRST YEAR— Three Months 

Arithmetic; Grammar; Carpentry; Blacksmithing ; Machine 
Shop; Engines and Boilers; Gas and Steam Tractors and Stationary 
Engines. 

SECOND YEAR— Three Months 

Farm Accounting; Agriculture; Carpentry — Farm Building 
Construction; Mechanical Drawing — Farm Building Plans; Machine 
Shop; Practical Horse Shoeing and Plow Eepairs; Engines — Ad- 
vanced Work. 

Note. — Students electing the short course who have not com- 
pleted the common branches will be provided for in the preparatory 
department of the school. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The course is designed to afford instruction in the subjects which 
pertain to life in the home. The training to be obtained through 
motor activity is regarded as one of the principal educational func- 
tions of both domestic science and art; the sociological and ethical 
value of such work is emphasized. 

The department occupies the entire Home Economics Building 
with sewing rooms, kitchen, dining and recitation room and fitting 
room. 

The sewing rooms are large, well lighted and commodious. They 
are equipped with sewing machines, lockers, charts, cutting tables, 
individual tables, dress forms and wall cases for the purpose of ex- 
hibiting the work. The best fashion magazines are received regu- 
larly. 

The kitchen is supplied with desks for individual work, equipped 
with all the necessary cooking utensils; gas stoves; electric plates for 
individual use ; gas range ; coal range ; refrigerator ; cupboards ; kitch- 
en cabinet; sink, and the cooking utensils necessary to provide the 
best facilities for class work. 

The dining room is equipped with dining table, dining chairs, 
china closet, buffet, etc. It is also supplied with china, silver and 
linen. 

The recitation room is supplied with reference books, charts and 
magazines devoted to the subject of domestic science. 



38 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Sewing I. A double period daily throughout the year. 

HAND SEWING. Primary stitches, seams, plackets, hems and 
patches are developed on samplers and simple articles. 

DEAFTING. The Tape and Rule Drafting System is used. 
Students draft all patterns used the first year. Students are required 
to furnish drafting material. 

GARMENT MAKING. The making of a fourpiece suit of 
underwear; two plain waists, a gingham dress and a simple dress of 
thin material. 

Sewing II. A double period daily throughout the year. 

DRESSMAKING. Bought patterns are introduced and draft- 
ing continued with special attention to design. Students are requir- 
ed to make one tailored waist, fancy blouse, tailored skirt, party dress 
and at least two other garments. 

ART NEEDLEWORK. The making and application of the 
principal stitches in embroidery, crochet, ornamental darning and ap- 
pliquet. 

MILLINERY. Fall term — The making of buckram frames and 
covering; making of bows, folds, selection of material as to quality, 
color and suitability. Spring term — Making of wire frame, covering, 
sewing on braid; draping of chiffon; making bows, flowers and or- 
naments; combining of materials; renovating old materials. 

TEXTILES. A study of fibers, flax, wool, cotton, and silk; their 
history, source, value, manufacture, adulteration and care. 

DOMESTIC ART DESIGN. The elements of design; line, 
light, shade, color; principles of harmony; the appreciation of struc- 
ture. The course, in part, is devoted to the application of the theory 
of design to technical problems such as designs for basketry, rugs, wall 
decoration, textiles, stenciling, etc. 

Cooking I. 

Classification of foods according to food principles; value of 
each to the body; effect of heat, and resulting changes in digest- 
ibility; food economy, physiological and pecuniary; selection and 
care of foods. 

LABORATORY. Three two-hour periods each week through the 
year. 

THEORY. Two one-hour recitation periods each week. This 
course must be accompanied or preceded by first year chemistry. 

Cooking II. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 39 

Theory and practice of the principles of the first year's work 
are elaborated and applied in the second year. Preservation of foods 
is included. Individual demonstrations of methods used in the prep- 
aration of foods, accompanied by lectures on the topics and materials 
thus illustrated, are required. These demonstration lectures are given 
by each senior in turn, before students and members of the faculty. 
The planning, marketing, directing and preparing, and serving of 
meals, including computation of cost for each item. The inviting, re- 
ceiving, and entertaining of guests. This work is required of each 
student in turn. 

SERVING — Study of principles underlying the effective and at- 
tractive serving of food at formal and informal meals, also of refresh- 
ments at various social functions. Practical work. 

DIETETICS. Study of foods and their relation to the body. 
Food values ; proportions of tissue-building and energy -producing sub- 
stance, digestibility and ease of assimilation, monetary value of nu- 
trients contained. Food suitable for infants, for adults under vary- 
ing conditions and for invalids. Food combinations and calculation 
of dietaries; the study of dietetic and economic problems. 

LABORATORY. Three two-hour periods each week through tne 
year. 

THEORY. Two one-hour recitation periods each week. 

HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT. Study of materials used in 
finishing, decorating, and furnishing a house, their comparative cost, 
durability, and care; ordering and arrangement of housework under 
varying conditions. Practical application of the processes of clean- 
ing is made by students under direction. 

LAUNDRY WORK. Mineral constituents of different waters, 
softening and cleansing agents, their effect upon fabrics and colors; 
removal of stains; use of starches and bluings; preparation of articles 
for laundering. Practical work includes laundering of bed and body 
linen, thin gowns, shirt-waist suits; washing of woolens and cleaning 
of laces and delicate articles. 

STUDY OF THE HOME. Evolution of the home; household 
industries; household service. The dwelling; arrangement, decora- 
tion, and furnishing. 

HOUSEHOLD BUSINESS. Household accounts; methods of 
payment; contracts; orders; other matters of business usage. The 
computing of cost of menus. Division of incomes for family groups 
in different circumstances and environments. 

HOME NURSING. The formal work includes the study of 
foods and diet, digestion, and nutrition; discussion as to the location, 



40 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

furnishing and sanitation of the sick room ; the details of the care of a 
patient in the home; the intelligent keeping of memoranda to aid the 
physicians in watching the progress of the disease; prevention and 
care of contagious diseases. Occasional lectures and demonstrations 
by physicians. Practical work under a trained nurse, in the college 
infirmary, including emergency relief and first aid to the injured. 

SANITATION, GENERAL AND HOUSEHOLD. Lectures 
and reference work on the following topics: Relation of micro-or- 
ganisms to the water, ice and milk supplies, and to the various un- 
cooked foods; disposal of garbage and sewage; prevention of common 
transmissible diseases; care by the public of public buildings and 
streets. 

BACTERIOLOGY. Four hours a week during the first semes- 
ter. Recitation and experiments. Bacteria, yeasts and molds. Cul- 
tures are made and life habits of each studied. Especial attention 
is given to the molds and bacteria of the household pathogenic bac- 
teria are studied; the precautions that should be taken in preventing 
infection are dealt with extensively. 

FOOD ANALYSIS. Four hours a week during the second se- 
mester. The essential materials in a complete food ; the reactions 
that occur in their preparation for use ; adulterants, and the adulter- 
ation of the common foods, how recognized and household tests. Pre- 
requisite Chemistry I. 

Short Course in Dressmaking. {Winter Term.) 

A three-months' winter course designed to meet the needs of 
girls who desire to become proficient in the elements of dressmaking 
and whose time and means are limited. The course embraces the 
following subjects: 

1. ARITHMETIC — A practical course in the elements, fac- 
toring, decimals, practical measurements, percentage. Chief emphasis 
will be laid upon problems pertaining to the home and farm. 

2. GRAMMAR — The course in Grammar is intended to give 
pupils a correct working knowledge of written and spoken English. 

3. COOKERY — A study of the principles and practice of cook- 
ery. This course includes the preparation of all classes of foods — 
fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, salads, pastry, bread, cakes, etc., and the 
principles involved in each. Special attention is given to the plan- 
ing and cost of meals and to table setting and serving. (Daily). 

4. SEWING — A half-day daily throughout the term. Instruc- 
tion is given in: 

PLAIN SEWING: Making of simple garments by hand to il- 
lustrate the use of plain and fancy stitches. 





1 



Table Set for May Day Luncheon 




Section of Chemical Laboratory 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 41 

GAEMENT MAKING : Cutting, fitting and making of waists 
and dresses; thorough drill in the use of patterns and dressmaking; 
choice and suitability of dress materials; color and color combina- 
tions. 

MATHEMATICS 

ARITHMETIC. A complete review of the essentials of arith- 
metic, including the fundamental processes, factoring, fractions, deci- 
mals, denominate numbers, longitude and time, practical measure- 
ments and percentage, together with the best methods of presenting 
these various subjects to pupils of the public schools. All abstract 
combinations are preceded, as far as possible, by constructive effort 
and the work made objective. In the more advanced units of study 
the subjects will be treated as they occur in actual business transac- 
tions regardless of text book limits. 

ARITHMETIC. (SHORT COURSE.) Industrial Arithme- 
tic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon problems pertaining to the 
farm. The work will involve factors, fractions, decimals, denomin- 
ate numbers, practical measurements and percentage. Problems deal- 
ing with such themes as the cost of buildings, marketing, measure- 
ments, insurance, taxes and banking will be taught in the most prac- 
tical business-like fashion. Daily through the Winter Term. 

ALGEBRA. ONE YEAR. All elementary algebra is covered 
up to and including quadratic equations, especial emphasis being laid 
on the fundamental laws of algebra, their derivation, and their rela- 
tion to the solution of problems. The relation of algebra to arithme- 
tic and to the higher branches of mathematics is constantly kept in 
mind and the advantages of algebra noted. 

PLANE GEOMETRY. ONE YEAR. Geometry, inductive 
and deductive. The student is grounded in the fundamental princi- 
ples of the subject. Methods of reasoning; the classification of the 
various geometrical forms, lines, angles, and surfaces, and the vari- 
ous kinds of proofs. The relation of Geometry to Arithmetic. Es- 
pecial emphasis on original and inventive work. The method of orig- 
inal demonstration through analysis, construction and proof. Many 
problems in engineering and surveying. 

SOLID GEOMETRY. ONE-HALF YEAR. In order that the 
subject may be more easily comprehended, geometrical solids are em- 
ployed in the demonstration of each proposition, and the students are 
also required, from time to time, to fashion out of cardboard various 
solids for use in demonstrating problems in construction. The appli- 
cation of geometry to science and industry receives much attention. 



42 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

ALGEBRA II. ONE-HALF YEAR. The graph, quadratic 
equations reviewed and completed. The theory of proportion. Prob- 
lems and formulae of physics. Progressions, Logarithms. 

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. ONE 
YEAR. The theoretical part of the subject is practically, completed 
at mid-year. Consideration of the surveying instruments, including 
chain and tape, compass, level, transit and planimeter. After spring 
opens practically all of the time is devoted to field work. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters in the basement of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room and 
apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 20x25 feet conveniently 
arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Carnegie 
Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and apparatus for 
twenty-four students working at one time. 

PHYSICS A. Seven hours a week for the year. This course 
consists of lectures, experiments and recitations. The experiments 
are simple, yet full and exhaustive. Especial attention is given to the 
solution of problems involving physical laws and formulae. A series 
of forty-eight experiments is prescribed and performed by students 
during the year and careful tabulations are made of the results. Es- 
pecial attention is given to the fundamentals that lead up to tine 
various courses in engineering. 

PHYSICS B. Seven hours a week for the year. Lectures will 
be given to cover the more advanced work in mechanics, the practical 
appliances on heat, light, and electricity and the more complex for- 
mulae for solving physical problems. Laboratory work will be given, 
which has especial bearing on the topics studied and which will be of 
particular benefit to the student specializing in the Mechanic Arts. 
Prerequisite, Physics A. 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY. Seven hours a week for the year. 
Three periods a week are devoted to the study of the laws, theories, 
formulae and fundamental principles of chemistry and to the solution 
of problems in chemical arithmetic. Two double periods each week are 
devoted to laboratory work. Over one hundred experiments involv- 
ing chemical change, affinity, valence, etc., are performed and noted 
so that the student both becomes familiar with the manipulation of 
apparatus and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

CHEMISTRY OF FOODS. Daily throughout the Fall term. 
Designed especially for young women who are pursuing domestic 



Xormal and Industrial School Catalog 43 

science courses. The essential materials in a complete food; the re- 
actions that occur in their preparation for use; the common adul- 
terations ; the foods in which commonly found ; how recognized ; house- 
hold tests, etc. Prerequisite. Physiology and Physics A. 

QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Daily for the first four and 
one-half months. Lecture once a week. Laboratory work four times 
a week. The course consists of a systematic study of the bases, and 
elements and radicals, and a method of analyzing an unknown sub- 
stance of complex composition. Emphasis is placed on such methods 
as can be used in quantitative determinations. Prerequisites, General 
Chemistry and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five times a week for the 
last half of the year. Two and one-half months given to gravimetric 
analysis and two months given to valumetric analysis. Some simple 
substances that illustrate the fundamentals of quantitative work, are 
taken up first. Then such as pig iron, steel, cement, soil, water for 
portable purposes, water for boiler purposes are analyzed. Prerequi- 
sites, General Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis and Elementary 
Qualitative Analysis. 

BACTEEIOLOGY. Five hours a week for the Spring term. 
Arranged to meet the needs of domestic science students. Recitations 
and experiments. The yeast plant is studied in all the important de- 
tails of its life habits. Especial attention is given to the molds and 
bacteria of the household. The life habits of the bacilli, their rela- 
tions to health and disease, the precautions that should be taken in 
preventing infection are dealt with extensively. 

AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGY 

AGRICULTURE I. The work is divided into three parts : Lab- 
oratory study, recitation from text, and reporting and discussing 
present day farm topics. One theme on a special subject is required 
of each student. The general field of agriculture is studied, with es- 
pecial emphasis placed on those phases that are of vital importance 
to farmers in North Dakota. Laboratory study is made of farm crops, 
soils, crop rotation and farm management. Part of the spring term 
is devoted to garden work. Agriculture I is required in all courses 
excepting the Commercial-Academic Course. 

AGRICULTURE II. Advanced course open only to students 
who have completed Course I or who may be otherwise specially fitted 
for more advanced work. The aim is to prepare students to teach ag- 
riculture, as well as to fit them better for farm practice. This course 
is of much greater value than the other work offered in agriculture 
in that it allows a more scientific study of the subjects treated. In 



44 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Course I it is impossible to do more than to introduce topics and give 
them a general study, while this course allows a student to do con- 
siderable independent work of the greatest value. 

AGRICULTURE, SUMMER SCHOOL. Given only in the 
summer term. This course aims to cover the field of agriculture in 
a general way that will help the rural teacher in presenting it to 
farmer boys and girls. It consists of text book study supplemented 
with outside reading, lectures and laboratory work. The exercises 
and experiments done in the laboratory are only those that can be 
done in any rural school room. The course is divided about as the reg- 
ular school year so the teacher may work up an outline for the 
whole year's work from that done in summer. 

AGRICULTURE, SHORT COURSE. Given during the win- 
ter term to accommodate young men from the farms who can be in 
school but a few months during the winter. Special phases of agri- 
culture are studied in laboratory and class recitation. Two days a 
week are spent in laboratory work, two in text recitation, and one in 
discussing current farm topics in farm papers. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. This is offered during the 
fall term. Four periods a week are spent in text study and discus- 
sion, and one double period in laboratory work. Experiments and dis- 
sections are carried on with as much detail as is necessary to get an 
insight into the vital processes of life. Hygiene is made an impor- 
tant part of the work. 

BOTANY. Offered during the winter and spring terms, three 
single and two double periods a week. Required of all students in 
the four and five year normal courses, and one term is required of 
students taking the two year normal course. The trend of this 
course is very modern. Almost no time is spent studying the non- 
vascular plants not having a definite agricultural importance. Es- 
pecial emphasis is placed upon the relation between botany and ag- 
riculture, thus laying an excellent foundation for later pursuit along 
agricultural lines. Laboratory work consists mainly of experimental 
work designed to show the physiological action of plants. During 
the spring, considerable out-of-door work is done, and a small herbar- 
ium is made during the latter part of the year. 

ENGLISH 

The work in English covers four years, three years' work being 
required for graduation. Special attention is given in all classes to 
the student's spoken and written language. 

GRAMMAR. A thorough study of theoretical and applied gram- 
mar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the use of 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 45 

correct forms of speech with special attention to common errors. 
Elementary composition. 

ENGLISH I. (a) Eeview of English grammar; three recita- 
tions a week, for three months. 

(6) Elementary composition and rhetoric. Letter-writing, de- 
scription, narration. An average of three recitations per week for 
six months. Special emphasis put upon punctuation, spelling, cap- 
italization, paragraph structure, figures of speech. Numerous short 
compositions are required. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Scott's Marmion; Burroughs' 
Sharp Eyes; Dickens' Christmas Carol; Gray's Elegy; Hawthorne's 
Great Stone Face, The Ambitious Guests, The Great Carbuncle; Lo- 
well's Vision of Sir Launfal; Irving's Rip Van Winkle, Legend of 
Sleepy Hollow. 

For reading: Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Poe's Gold Bug; 
Warner's A Hunting of the Deer, How I Killed a Bear; Hale's The 
Man Without a Country. 

ENGLISH II. (a) Advanced composition and rhetoric, two 
recitations a week. Eeview and continued description and narration, 
usage, diction, clearness, force, elegance, paragraphing, principles of 
versification; periodic, balanced, loose, long and short sentences; fig- 
ures of speech. Work in composition required throughout the year. 
Special attention given to exposition and argumentation. 

(b) Masterpieces for study: Arnold's Sohrab and Eustum; 
Burns' The Cotter's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, To a Mountain 
Daisy, For A' That and A' That, Epistle to J. Lapraik, Highland 
Mary, To Mary in Heaven, My Heart's in the Highlands, Bruce to 
His Men at Bannockburn, Bonnie Doon; Addison's DeCoverly Pa- 
pers; Milton's Minor Poems; The Merchant of Venice; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner, 

For reading: As You Like It; The Iliad (Books 1, 6, 22, 24) ; 
The Lady of the Lake; Dickens' David Copperfield. 

ENGLISH III. (a) History of English Literature. 

(b) Written reviews are required of assigned plays and work. 
The composition work is based upon the masterpieces studied and 
takes the form of critical and biograplfrcal essays. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Burke's Conciliation, Macbeth, 
Newcomer and Andrews' Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and 
Prose. 



46 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

For reading: Silas Marner, Julius Caesar, Ivanhoe; Tenny- 
son's The Coming of Arthur, Launcelot and Elaine, Guinevere, The 
Passing of Arthur. 

ENGLISH IV. (a) History of American literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library supple- 
mented by text books. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a Wa- 
ter-Fowl, A Forest Hymn, The Flood of Years, The Green Moun^- 
tain Boys, The Yellow Violet, To a Fringed Gentian ; Emerson's Com- 
pensation, Self-Eeliance ; Lincoln's First and Second Inaugural Ad- 
dresses, Gettysburg Speech, The Emancipation Proclamation; Poe's 
Poems; Taylor's Lars; Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; Whit- 
tier's Slavery Poems and Snowbound. 

For reading: Franklin's Poor Eichard's Almanac; Hawthorne's 
House of Seven Gables; Parkman's La Salle; Thoreau's The Succes- 
sion of Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds; Warner's My Summer in 
a Garden. 

LATIN 

LATIN I. The elements. Daily throughout the year. Careful 
study and practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections and 
syntax, a gaining of a working vocabulary. Translating of simple 
prose. Much time and emphasis is placed upon the translation of 
English into Latin. Word formation also receives considerable at- 
tention. 

LATIN II. Caesar. Four books; translation into clear idio- 
amtic English; the life of Caesar; the Eoman government of his 
time; the formation of the Eoman army; sight reading; prose com- 
position based upon the text of Caesar. 

LATIN III. Six orations; four in Catalinam; De Imperio 
Pompei or Pro Marcello and Pro Archia; the life of Cicero; the his- 
tory of his time; Eoman oratory; sight reading; prose composition 
based on the text; memorizing f of especial passages of Pro Archia. 

LATIN IV. VEEGIL. Six books of the Aeneid ; syntax ; gram- 
matical peculiarites ; occasional metrical translation; the life of Ver- 
gil; the history of his times; the mythology of the Aeneid; the ver- 
sification of the Aeneid. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 47 

GERMAN 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN. For beginners, special attention 
is given to correct pronunciation, the principles of grammar, the con- 
version of simple prose from German into English and from English 
into German, and to conversation exercises. 

GERMAN READING. Review of the grammar; practice in 
translating from German into idiomatic English; written exercises 
based on a text and Harris' Composition, and Joynes-Meissner's 
Grammar; Hans Anderson's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, Storm's Im- 
mensee, Gerstacker's Germelshausen, Dillard's Ans dem Deutchen 
Dichterwald, Heyse's L'Arrabiata, Benedix's Die Hochzeitsreise, 
Schiller's Der Neff als Onkel, etc. 

CLASSIC GERMAN. Joynes-Meissner's Grammar, Suderman's 
Johannes; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; Goethe's Egmont; Frey- 
tag's Die Jonrnalisten ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, etc. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

BOOKKEEPING I. Two terms' work in Goodyear & Marshall's 
"Sixty Lessons in Business," — a merchandise set. One term of work 
on the lumber set in Goodyear & Marshall's "Advanced Accounting," 
Principally individual work. Students may enter at any time, but 
enrollment at the beginning of the year is greatly preferred. Open to 
eighth grade graduates. Counted as a full elective in all courses. 
Two periods per day of school work. 

BOOKKEEPING II. Open only to those who have finished 
Bookkeeping I. Those who have credit for a year of Bookkeeping 
elsewhere must do the lumber set (which is the third term of work in 
Bookkeeping I.) Professional skill is required for credit in this 
course. The department and the school reserve the right to with- 
hold credit if the pupil has not attained sufficient skill, without re- 
gard to the length of time and quantity of work performed. 

STENOGRAPHY I. Text book and easy dictation the work 
of the year. Will count as an elective in any course. Open only to 
students who have made some progress beyond the eighth grade, and 
seem likely to carry the work with success. Consent of the teacher 
required for every enrollment. Only students who show considerable 
earnestness and capacity will be admitted late. Two hours a day of 
class work. 

STENOGRAPHY II. Open to those who have taken Stenog- 
raphy, and also to those who have learned elsewhere to take easy 
dictation. Students from other schools may enter the class, even 
though they write some other system. Open only to those who have 



48 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

taken typewriting for one year. Typewriting II must be taken at the 
same time. 

TYPEWRITING I. Open to any student. Two hours of prac- 
tice per day is required, at hours most convenient to the student. 
Touch typewriting is taught and required. Credit in this course will 
depend upon the skill attained, and not upon the length of time 
spent. Mosher's charts are used. The first term's work will include 
the ability to write three lines per minute of material taken from the 
first five charts. This must be written without looking at the key- 
board, and without error. The second term's work will be writing 
two lines per minute of ordinary new material. The third term's 
work will be writing three lines per minute, same conditions. Indi- 
vidual work, and students may enter at any time. 

TYPEWRITING II. A continuation of Typewriting I. A 
professional degree of speed, accuracy, and skill in all phases of type- 
writing work is required for credit. The department and school re- 
serve the right to withhold credit from pupils who have not attained 
professional skill. 

BUSINESS ENGLISH. Two terms of practice in writing busi- 
ness letters. Open to those who have passed in English. 

COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC. Open only to those who have 
passed in Normal Arithmetic or its equivalent. One term. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. One term. Not open to first year stu- 
dents. Open to second year short course students. 

SPELLING. Twenty minutes a day, three times a week. 
Each commercial student will be required to take this work until able 
to spell with not more than three mistakes a list of one hundred new, 
difficult words. This list will be compiled from words in common 
business, newspaper and literary use, and will not contain words that 
are unduly technical, nor any of the freaks of spelling. Important 
proper nouns will be included. 

PENMANSHIP. Thirty minutes per day, twice a week. W T ork 
given in two sections, elementary and advanced. A fair start in the 
use of muscular writing will be required for admission to the ad- 
vanced section. The advanced course will be a study of the Palmer 
Method of Business Writing. The students shall enroll in the Stu- 
dents' Criticism Course, as described in the pamphlet issued by, the 
A. N. Palmer Co., entitled "Pupils' Criticism Department of the 
Palmer Method of Business Writing." 







I <H 1 1 


KB JL 


nl 


If I 9 


jT^ hUb- ^Ji * 


I^BHfi^J 



Work of Domestic Art Department 




Music Studio 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 49 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. This course includes a thor- 
ough review of the history of the United States and is intended for 
students entering the One Year Elementary Course and the Two Year 
Elementary Course. 

CIVICS. This study is intended to acquaint the student with 
the machinery of our government both local and national and thus 
prepare him to perform his part intelligently as a citizen of our 
country. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. A careful study of the Ancient Orien- 
tal Civilization in Western Asia and in Egypt. The history of Greece 
and Rome is comprised in this course. Stress is placed on the origin 
and growth of the institutions of civilization and the student is led to 
discover what essential elements these nations contributed to modern 
life. 

MODERN HISTORY. The period covered by this course ex- 
tends from the coming of Charlemagne, 800 A. D., to the present 
time. Special attention is given to the rise of the various powers of 
Europe, to the influences that shaped them and the relation they bear 
to the history of our country. 

AMERICAN HISTORY. In this advanced course of history 
the student is led to see that the achievements in political, industrial, 
social and educational fields were gained by human activities rightly 
directed and that the responsibility of their maintenance in part rests 
on him, also to realize the importance of our relation with world 
nations. Information from sources other than the text book is re- 
quired. Students entering this course must have had Ancient His- 
tory. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. A comprehensive study is here pre- 
sented of the study of the constitutional history of the United States 
from its beginning to the present time. It includes a study of the 
growth of our national government and the government of the town- 
ship, county, city and state and the relation between the various forms. 
The student is impressed with the necessity of a knowledge of this 
subject that he may become a useful citizen. Special work is requir- 
ed in comparing our government with other governments of the 
world. 

DRAWING AND FINE ARTS 

The department offers thorough instruction in fine and decora- 
tive arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the third floor of Car- 
negie Hall, and there is ample equipment of casts and studio fur- 
nishings. The department aims to give thorough instruction in the 



50 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

principles of drawing and painting; to enlarge the student's acquain- 
tance with what is best in art; to offer courses of instruction adapted 
to the needs of teachers in the public schools and supervisors of art 
instruction in city schools. With serious study a high degree of 
efficiency and technical knowledge may be attained here at much less 
expense than would be incurred for similar instruction in a large 
city. 

Not "art for art's sake/' but art for the enrichment of life is the 
conception held here. Artistic taste and appreciation of the beautiful 
are needed in the humblest and busiest life. Especial emphasis is 
placed upon the application of the principles of fine arts to the en- 
vironment of the every day life. 

FINE ARTS. A general course in appreciation and combin- 
ing the essentials in drawing, painting and composition. A study of 
form using different media — charcoal, pencil, water color and oil. 
Still life and flower painting in water color. Study of composition 
by using flowers and landscapes. Figure sketching, advanced com- 
position and illustration in charcoal, water color and china painting. 

NORMAL PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING. The work of this 
course is planned with special reference to the teaching of drawing 
and hand work in the public schools. One period daily for three terms 
is required for the completion of the work. With public school mu- 
sic this course forms a full normal credit. 

TERM A. Primary Grades. The work consists of paper fold- 
ing, tearing and cutting, story telling by means of colored paper and 
crayola, color study with simple color charts, the study and represen- 
tation of simple well known forms, silhouettes of animals, simple 
figures and landscape work, representation of flowers and birds with 
crayolas and water color, paper construction, weaving, and raffia 
wrapping, braiding and knotting. 

TERM B. Intermediate Grades. Study of form by use of char- 
coal, pencil and color. Special study of the cube, sphere and cylin- 
der, and similar shapes; color theory; hue, intensity and textile 
values, chart of complementary colors, and relation of these colors. 
Simple design problems, illustrating the uses of the elements and 
principles of design. Landscapes in black and white, and colored rep- 
resentations of autumn, winter and spring. Silhouettes of casts of 
animals. Scales of tone values. Figure sketching and illustrating. 
Paper construction, reed mats and baskets. 

TERM C. Grammar Grades. Some of the same problems are 
worked out but the work is more technical. Principles of design and 
perspective are considered. Designs are made and .applied to sewed 
basketry. Still life studies are worked out in color and charcoal. 
Special study of birds during the spring term. Study of master pieces 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 51 

from reproductions. Methods of teaching drawing and general out- 
line for the grades. 

METAL WORK. The problems given are considered in rela- 
tion to each other in order to develop a general knowledge of sheet 
metal work. Processes include forming, sawing, filing and building 
by hard and soft soldering, riveting, etc., together with the study of 
the processes or repousee, etching and coloring. 

POTTEEY. The course begins with the building of hand-made 
pieces of different sizes and shapes; the making of tiles together with 
decoration by relief and incised lines; building of pilaster models; 
casting of moulds and pouring and finishing of mould-made pieces. 
Students glaze and fire a part of their work. 

HANDICRAFTS. In addition to the courses in metal work and 
pottery, students are offered work in the following crafts : Book- 
binding, cut and tooled leather work, advanced construction with tilo 
matting, raffia and reeds, stenciling, and block painting. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial 
School comprises instruction in piano, voice, chorus work, harmony, 
history of music, music theory and science of music. Special efforts 
are made to make clear to the students the importance of technical 
work and the study of touch, accentuation and tone coloring. This 
leads to an understanding of what it means to interpret music and a 
thorough conception of the art of expression and artistic execution. 
The main purpose of piano study is to enable the student to under- 
stand what music is; help him understand that music, like all other 
art, must touch the soul of man, or interpret the soul of man — and 
be an expression of character, personality and individuality. 

The following outlines are suggestive of the work done. The 
studies given will be such as most fully meet the needs of the pupil. 

PREPARATORY. Course in hand culture; major scales; By- 
er's method for beginners, or Czerny Op. 599. 

FIRST YEAR. Elementary technic; Loeschern Op. 65; Lich- 
ner Sonatinas, album of instructive and interesting pieces. 

SECOND YEAR. Elementary technic continued; Loeschern 
Op. 66; Heller Op. 47; albums of instructive and interesting pieces 
by the best composers. 

JUNIOR YEAR. Plaidy Technical Studies; Cramer Octave 
Studies; Heller Op. 47; Czerny School of Velocity Op. 299; Haydn 
and Mozart Sonatas. Selections from Schumann, Grieg, Heller, Nev- 
in and others. 



52 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

SENIOR YEAR. Advanced technical work continued; Cramer 
Studies; Mozart and Beethoven Sonatas; Selections from Chopin, 
Schumann, Bach, Liszt, Rubenstein and other modern and classical 
composers. 

VOCAL MUSIC 

The course in vocal music is designed to afford a thorough and 
comprehensive training in the elements; to secure accuracy and ra- 
pidity in sight reading and singing; to develop a taste for the best 
grades of music, and to prepare students to teach the subject system- 
atically, in all grades of the public schools. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. Designed to enable students to 
teach such principles of music as will apply in the several grades of 
the public schools. Instruction is given in time, tune, technique and 
the aesthetics of music. These subjects are exemplified in practice. 
Emphasis is laid upon the elements, theory of scale formation, melo- 
dic construction, elements of notation and harmony. The student 
becomes thoroughly familiar with the best in grade music. One 
period daily throughout the year, and one-half credit is allowed. 

CHORAL SINGING. Daily chorus practice for a brief period 
is given the entire school. This class is made up of the entire body 
of students and attendance is compulsory. Constant practice is had 
on such compositions as lie within the range and understanding of 
the pupils. Two glee clubs are organized and given systematic drill. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

By an act of the Legislature the State Normal-Industrial School 
is required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Military 
Science and the company organized and drilled is subject to regular 
inspection by .the Adjutant General of the State. In harmony with 
this provision young men are drilled regularly in the schools of the 
soldier, squad, platoon, company, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(1) ORGANIZATION. The cadet battalion at present com- 
prises, with the commandant, one cadet captain, one cadet first lieu- 
tenant, one cadet second lieutenant, five sergeants, one color sergeant, 
six corporals, and one artificer and cadets. A permanent company is 
maintained under the name of Company A. A company is organized 
during the second term composed principally of short course students. 
This is known as Company B. 

(2) EQUIPMENT. The State Normal and Industrial School 
is supplied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutrements; a Win- 
chester rifle for long range practice, Winder target rifles ; a large At- 
kins disappearing target; United States regulation rapiers, for 




A View in the Dining Room 




A Class in Cookery 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 53 

fencing; sabers and belts for cadet officers; silk battalion flag, Uni- 
ted States regulation ammunition, consisting of cartridges for tar- 
get practice, and blank cartridges for use in volley firing and skirmish 
drill. Application has been made to the Adjutant Generai, IT. S. A., 
for the detail of a regular army officer and the issuance of modern 
arms and equipment. . 

(3) APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS. The- officers 
and non-commissioned officers are selected from among those cadets 
who have been most studious, soldier-like and faithful in the per- 
formance of their duties and who have been most exemplary in their 
deportment. The commandant and the commissioned officers con- 
stitute the board of examiners for the appointment and promotion of 
privates and non-commissioned officers. 

(4) MILITARY DIPLOMA. Commissions and warrants are 
issued to the commissioned officers who are duly examined and deem- 
ed worthy of promotion, provided, however, that they have drilled at 
least one term as officers, have been promoted to higher rank, have 
received an average of not less than 75 per cent, and Rave partici- 
pated in at least one annual military contest. 

(5) UNIFORM. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn by 
all cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in courses re- 
quiring attendance for more than a single term. This uniform con- 
sists of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray color, modeled after 
the United States Military Academy uniform, and is made in two 
qualities costing, respectively, $10.85 and $12.85. The uniform is 
tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, durable and economi- 
cal a su.it as the student can obtain for this amount. It may be pur- 
chased at the school, at actual cost, or elsewhere, as the student elects. 
Uniforms and gloves are worn at all regular drills and inspections. 

(6) ATTENDANCE. Six terms of military drill are requir- 
ed of all boys, unless excused on account of physical disability. A 
physician's certificate must accompany such excuse. The standing of 
each cadet is averaged at the close of each term. The chief items con- 
sidered in determining the grade are attendance, deportment and 
drill. Only those cadets whose average is above 75 per cent for the 
six terms will be exempt from attendance. 

(7. ANNUAL MILITARY CONTEST AND PRIZES. An 
annual military contest is held at the close of the Winter Term. 
There are three events : Company Drill and Inspection ; Squad Drill ; 
Individual Contest Drill. For each drill at the annual military con- 
test there are three judges selected by the President and Commandant 
The squad receiving the highest percentage in contest drill is presented 
with a silk ribbon, suitably inscribed, which is attached to the battal- 
ion color", and the members of the squad receive honorable mention 



54 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

in the catalogue. The squad receiving second mark is given honor- 
able mention in the catalogue also. The prize for the best drilled man 
in the individual contest is a silver medal and for second a bronze 
medal. The individual contest is open to all cadets and non-com- 
missioned officers of the battalion. All cadets who take part in the 
annual military contest must appear in full regulation uniform. 

In the 1915 contest there were two medals awarded in the In- 
dividual Contest, as follows: 

First Prize, Co. A., a silver medal Corporal Paul Rehberg 

Second Prize, Co. A., a bronze medal Corporal LeRoy Pease 

In the squad contest the winners were as follows: 

First Place— Squad I of Co. A. 

Second Place — Squad II of Co. A. 

Squad I was composed of the following. 

First Lieutenant Walz (Commanding), Corporal Fleming, and 
Cadets, Morgans, Healey, A. Lee, Huldstrand, Johnson, Courtney 
and Vroman. 

Squad II was composed of the following: Second Lieutenant 
Crary (Commanding), and Cadets Ashley, Black, Martin, Baldwin, 
Bobbe, Wickersham, King, Herbert Pease. 

Mr. Jay Harm was captain of Company A for the year 1914-'15. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The primary purpose of the State Normal and Industrial School 
is the harmonius development of the entire boy or girl. Athletics 
and sports have a place in the development of every normal person 
and receive proper encouragement and supervision. Physical train- 
ing is compulsory; two periods per week for six terms. A physical 
examination is given each student taking gymnasium work and his 
greatest needs are determined by the use of cards and charts. These 
cards are kept on file, for reference, so that his improvement may be 
noted and weaknesses corrected. Each student must procure a gym- 
nasium suit of prescribed pattern and gymnasium shoes. 

Physical Training. 

(a) FOR YOUNG MEN. Two periods per week of six terms; 
6 points credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnastics, 
both with and without apparatus; free-hand exercises; sports. Foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball and tennis are available in season. 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 55 

(b) FOE YOUNG WOMEN. Two periods per week for six 
terms; 6 points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises are 
similar to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bells and barbell train- 
ing, club swinging, marching, running, exercises with light appara- 
tus, etc. Basketball is given a fair share of the time. 

ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL TEAINING. Especially de- 
signed for students expecting to teach, and coach, athletics. Anat- 
omy, physiology and hygiene will be taken up so as to give the stu- 
dent a practical working basis for the course and show the necessity 
and benefits of physical training. The fundamental principles of the 
different branches of athletics will be considered; selection, training 
and conditioning of athletes; problems of temperament, climate, 
weather and traveling. Lectures, charts, demonstrations and note- 
book work once a week throughout the year. 



List of Students 



SENIOR CLASS 
NORMAL-MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 

Newell Fowler Snohomish, Wash. 

John Kosel Forbes 

A. C. Malin Kulm 

Emmet Francis McGraw Cogswell 

NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE. 

Bertha May Barnes Ellendale 

Clara Rosina Hess Monroe, Wis. 

Alice Vera Higgs Ellendale 

Edythe Mae Merchant Ellendale 

NORMAL COURSE 

Regina Bakko Kenyon, Minn. 

Clara Josephine Bjornstad Ellendale 

Lulu Wilson Briggle Forbes 

Daisy Brown Ellendale 

Irma Lucille Conner Rhame 

Marion H. Cortrite Monango 

Bernice E. Dada Forman 

Sceone Estella Eichinger Brussels, Wis. 

Marion Agnes Fleming Ellendale 

Myrtle Anice Hill Ellendale 

Emma Hollan Kulm 

Nellie Howard Ellendale 

Ina M. Hutsinpiller Oakes 

Beatrice Harriet Keagle Winship, S. D. 

Anna Marie Kellogg Ellendale 

Joycelyn Lane Kellogg Ellendale 

John J. Laemmle Ashley 

Hulda Lange Kulm 

Mary Lola Laughlin Monango 

Gertrude Merklein Wausau, Wis. 

Laura Potter Ellendale 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 57 

Hazel Evelyn Eandall Ellendale 

Vera Lauretta Schrader Ludden 

Lula May Thompson Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Katherine Deveraux Pollock Ellendale 

Frances Mary Turnham Ludden 

Marguerite Wyckoff Monango 

MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 

Hector Porter Ellendale 

HOME ECONOMICS COUKSE 

Nellie W. Earnest Kalispele, Mont. 

Maude Marion Holte Ellendale 

ACADEMIC COUKSE 

Francis Leon Abraham Ellendale 

Frances Leota Boom Ellendale 

Frank Callan Ellendale 

Merl I. Comstock Marmarlh 

John Dawe Fullerton 

Dorothy Stephenson Deane Monango 

Richard John Gamble Rush City, Minn. 

William Ashton Gamble Rush City, Minn. 

Jay Alvin Harm Ellendale 

Donald John McCormick Soldiers Grove, Wis. 

William C. McCulloch Edgeley 

Raplh Oertli Ellendale 

Dorothy Mae Smith Ellendale 

COMMERCIAL ACADEMIC COURSE 

John Joseph Carpenter Cogswell 

JUNIORS 

Ayres, Mattie T Frederick, S. D. 

Ayres, Gladys Elizabeth Frederick, S. D. 

Banks, Orvis Ellendale 

Banks, Corvis Ellendale 

Barnes, Belva M Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Mildred Viola Ellendale 

Brown, William Floyd Ellendale 

Burkhart, Mary Guelph 

Callan, Carrie Ellendale 

Cook, Angelina Marguerite Ellendale 

Crary, Charles Ellendale 

Dunton, Mauriel Milton Ellendale 



58 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Farrell, Neil C Lisbon 

Fleming, Stanley J Ellendale 

Geer, Clayton Ellendale 

Hatfield, Edna Fullerton 

Hatfield, Jane Gertrude Fullerton 

Hay, Ruth Geraldine Revillo, S. D. 

Kalbus, Elsie Ellendale 

Lee, Thomas Cayuga 

Leverty, Agnes Ellendale 

Ludwig, Irene L Wheaton, Minn. 

McGraw, Gene Cogswell 

Meachem, J. Leonard Ellendale 

Miller, Aida Dewey Ellendale 

Noess, Lulu Marie Ellendale 

Olson, Ada Hillsboro 

Pease, Leroy Stirura 

Peek, Herbert Charles Ellendale 

Podoll, Ella Jud 

Potter, Robert D Ellendale 

Rehberg, Paul H Ellendale 

Saunders, Walter Layfette Ellendale 

Stewart, Dean Melton Ellendale 

Strutz, Arthur George Oakes 

Sween, Julia Bessie - Straubville 

Sullivan, Olive May Ellendale 

Summerfield, Bernice Milnor 

Thrams, Everett Bismarck 

Ward, Hiram V Ellendale 

Weber, Mamie Forbes 

Weber, Euth Forbes 

Welcher, Eber Ellendale 

AVilliams, Beulah lone Ellendale 

Wilson, Helen Monango 

Young, Mabel Ellendale 

THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Ackermann, Fred Wishek 

Ashley, Jay Brampton 

Bohling, Sarah Ellendale 

Coleman, Preston Ellendale 

Doerheim, Emanuel Lehr 

Haskins, Edward George Ellendale 

Hill, Hervey Ellendale 

Joyner, Audrey Ellendale 

Kellogg, Paul Ellendale 

Lynde, Llewellyn Ellendale 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 59 

Lynde, Orrin Ellendale 

Morgans, Ira Frederick, S. D. 

Nichols, Harry E Fullerton 

Pederson, Fritz B OaJces 

Sween, Julia Straubville 

Wagner, Ruth A Guelph 

Walz, Fred Ashley 

Wood, Earnest Forbes 

Zieman, Gertrude Oakes 

Zieman, Harold H Oakes 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 

Black, Ceryl E Ellendale 

Brown, George Ellendale 

Callan, Emily Ellendale 

Clarke, Ethel M Braddock 

Coleman, Bessie Ellendale 

Coleman, Helen Ellendale 

Courtney, Everett Guelph 

Crandall, Fern Ellendale 

Ferree, Myrtle Ellendale 

Graham, Gladys Ellendale 

Hall, Faye Monango 

Hermansen, Anna Ellendale 

Hollan, Daisy Kulm 

Johansen, Agnes Ellendale 

Joyner, Albert Ewart Ellendale 

McConville, Elizabeth Forbes 

McGinnis, Lucile Silverleaf 

Porter, Jacob B Ellendale 

Quatier, Helen Napoleon 

Sauer, Edwin Hazelton 

Thompson, Agnes Edmunds 

Way, Winnif red Katherine Ellendale 

Weist, Martha L Ellendale 

Welcher, Donna Ellendale 

Wentzel, Helen Ellendale 

Williams, Lewis Ellendale 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Anderson, Hazel Ellendale 

Anderson, Oscar Ellendale 

Billey, Esther Ellendale 

Billey, Helen Ellendale 

Billey, Leino , Ellendale 

Blumer, Charles Ellendale 



60 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Bobbe, Mark . . Ellendale 

Bowerman, Mae Fullerton 

Brooks, Iva Cogswell 

Brown, Verda J Ellendale 

Colby, Minnie Martha Cogswell 

Fulton, Marie Forbes 

Halley, Olga Cogswell 

Homedew, Lillie , .Ellendale 

Homedew, Eoy Ellendale 

Hultstrand, Andrew Fairdale 

Hyatt, Era Jeanetta Ludden 

Johnson, Elmer H Wilton 

King, Claude Ellendale 

Lee, Arthur , Cayuga 

Matsumoto Umajiro Matsubara, Ibaraki-ken, Japan 

McMartin, L. Leonard Ellendale 

McMillan, Beulah Manson, Iowa 

Millard, Murrell, M Ellendale 

Olson, Odina Buxton 

Pease, Herbert Stirum 

Peterson, Edna Marion 

Peterson, Gladys Edmunds 

Peterson, Mabel Ludden 

Purvis, Floyd W Plainview, Minn. 

Quatier, Agnes Napoleon 

Quatier, Emma Napoleon 

Smith, Charles Ellendale 

Thompson, Annie Edmunds 

Townsend, George Ludden 

Vroman, Zaida Edgeley 

Waite, Mary Guelph 

Wheeler, Wilbur T Wessington Springs, S. D. 

Young, Victor Cackle 

ELEMENT AEY NORMAL COURSE. 

Backman, Esther Frederick, S. D. 

Borner, Ida Stanton 

Bowerman, Alice Fullerton 

Combellick, Wilma . Gettysburg, S. D. 

Fulton, Dollie Forbes 

George, Margaret Forbes 

Harvey, Dorothy Ellendale 

Herrmann, Amelia Monango 

Hiom, Emma Braddock 

Joseph, Pearle Ellendale 

Kabrud, Cora Forbes 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 61 

Larson, Anna Oakes 

McCafferty, Fay Dewey Formost, Alberta, Canada 

McConville, Alice Forbes 

Mankinen, Helma Frederick, S. D. 

Martin, Jennie Edmunds 

Mock, Maude Ellendale 

Rossmiller, Leona Ellendale 

Swanson, Ellen Havana 

Zinter, Anna Ellendale 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Arndt, Helga Fullerton 

Baldwin, Dorsey Ludden 

Barnes, Maude Ellendale 

Benson, Malinda Lamoure 

Bethke, Clara Edgeley 

Black, Marguerite Ellendale 

Bowler, Dorothy Ellendale 

Bowler, Mamie Ellendale 

Bowler, Lucy Ellendale 

Campbell, Bessie Ellendale 

Coleman, Helen L Ellendale 

Colwell, Clifford Berlin 

Combellick, Flora Ellendale 

Crabtree, Muriel Ellendale 

Crandall, Ethel Ellendale 

Doan, Elva J Brittain 

Dunphy, Albert E Ellendale 

Evans, Martha Ellendale 

Fleming, Ethel Ellendale 

Franz, Ben Kulm 

Fuller, Eliza Cavalier 

Gallagher, Robert Ellendale 

Geer, Doris Ellendale 

Gish, Grace Ellendale 

Golden, Leonard Ellendale 

Grosshans, Robert Glover 

Gruenig, Jacob Buffalo Gap, S. D. 

Haas. Ruth Ellendale 

Harris, Edna Mae Ellendale 

Healey, Harold M New Salem 

Hecklesmiller, Ida M Ellendale 

Heine, Henrietta Ellendale 

Higgs, Mamie Ellendale 

Hill, Ethel Ellendale 

Holte. Alpha Ellendale 

Honglantf, H. E Ellendale 



62 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

Johnson, Olive Ellendale 

Jones, Hobart Ellendale 

Jones, Lola M Ellendale 

Judkins, Francis Ellendale 

Koch, Joseph Aberdeen, S. D. 

Koch, Marie Ellendale 

Lane, Ella R Ellendale 

Leiby, Ruth Ellendale 

Linvill, W. B Guelph 

Linvill, Mrs. W. B Guelph 

Lynde, Grace Ellendabe 

Magnire, Thelma G Medicine Lake, Mont. 

Martin, Grandon Ellendale 

Maunu, Edward Hecla, 8. D. 

Mielke, Claude Coulee 

Miller, Alvin Ellendale 

Misfeldt, Elizabeth Ellendale 

Moe, Jalmer Rutland 

Nickolaus, Fred B Martin 

Oertli, Ena Ellendale 

Oertli, Roy Ellendale 

Olson, Carrie Washburn 

Peek, Bersha Ellendale 

Perry, Loren Coulee 

Purinteen, Pearl Temvifc 

Randall, Pearl Ellendale 

Rehberg, Elizabeth Ellendale 

Ritmiller, Martha Ellendale 

Saunders, Olive Ellendale 

Schon, Katherine Ellendale 

Sheppard, Sara Wessington Springs, S. D. 

Shimmin, Charles Forbes 

Skaar, Henry Cayuga 

Starck, Martha Judson 

Swenson, Nancy J Forest Lake, Minn. 

Townsend, Sarah Ellendale 

Walker, Frances Ellendale 

Walton, Frances Ellendale 

Webb, Irene Ellendale 

Wickersham, Lee Ellendale 

Willis, Coyle Ellendale 

Wirch, Mary Wirch 

Zieman, Gladys Oakes 

SHORT COURSE STUDENTS. 

Aho, Betty Ludden 

Alderin, Andrew Fort Clark 



Normal and Industrial School Catalog 63 

Alderin, Harold Deapolis 

Anderson, Walter Wessington Springs, S. D. 

Applequist, Morgan C Ellendale 

Backman Alfred Frederick, S. D. 

Baker, A. Joseph Hazelton 

Bjelde, Andrew Frederick, S. D. 

Bjur, Emil Kulm 

Bogue, Lynis Frederick, S. D. 

Brazda, John Fort Clark 

Christinson, Jennie Edgeley 

Davis, Frank Ellendale 

Davis, Lloyd Ellendale 

Dawson, J. S Monango 

Dawson, Lola Monango 

Feichtner, John Monango 

Friberg, August Kulm 

Granstrom, Emma Washburn 

Hart, Carl Forbes 

Johnson, Selma Oakes 

Kosel, Jacob Forbes 

Letson, Maurice Ellendale 

Mankinen, Emma Frederick, S. D. 

Marttilla, Frank H Frederick, S. D. 

Millard, Euth Ellendale 

Morrow, Eldred V Ellendale 

Mount, John Baldwin 

Mount, Neva Baldwin 

Pearson, Victor Hecla, S. D. 

Peterson, Effie Marion 

Podoll, Robert Jud 

Rasche, Dewey Regan 

Rasche, Eddie Regan 

Reid, Mathew Bristol, S. D. 

Riedlinger, Lydia Temvik 

Schmierer, Adam Ellendale 

Strand, Selmer Ellendale 

Vroman, Royce Edgeley 

Waite, Clendon Guelph 

Waite, Maylon Guelph 

Waite, Waldon Guelph 

Ward, Thomas Earl Baldwin 

Wattles, Harry Ellendale 

Weist, Emil Ellendale 

Wiitula, Lillian Hecla, S. D. 

Wright, Hector Aberdeen, S. D. 

Young, Eugene Coleharbor 

Zinter, Julius Ellendale 



64 Normal and Industrial School Catalog 

SUMMARY. 

Senior Class 52 

Junior Class 46 

Third Year Class 20 

Second Year Class 26 

First Year Class 39 

Elementary Normal Course 20 

Special Students 79 

Short Course Students 49 

Grand Total 331 



INDEX 



Admission 11 

Agriculture 43 

Athletics 16 

Bacteriology 43 

Board and Rooms 9 

Board of Trustees 3 

Bookkeeping 47 

Buildings 9 

Calendar 2 

Chemistry 42 

Civics 49 

College Preparatory Course 27 

Commercial Department 47 

Cooking 38 

Courses of Study 18 

Credits 11 

Description of Courses 28 

Diploma and Certificates 12 

Discipline 15 

Domestic Arts and Science 37 

Dormitory, Dacotah Hall 9 

Drawing and Fine Arts 49 

Dressmaking 38, 40 

Education 28 

Elective Courses 11 

Engineering Farm 35 

English 44 

Expenses 15 

Faculty 4 

Fine Arts Course 50 

Food Analysis 40 

Forging 31 

General Information 8 

German 47 

Grammar 44 

Gymnastics 12 



High School Graduates 11, 21 

History 49 

Home Economics 37 

Latin 46 

Lecture Course 16 

Library 15 

Life of Student 9 

List of Students 56 

Literary and Musical Societies 16 

Location and Equipment 8 

Manual Training 34 

Mathematics 41 

Mechanic Arts 30 

Mechanic Arts Course 24 

Mechanical Drawing 32 

Military Science 52 

Music — Vocal 52 

Music — Instrumental 51 

Normal Courses 19-23 

Observation and Teaching 29 

Pattern Making 32 

Physics 42 

Physical Training 54 

Prizes 13 

Prospective Students 17 

Psychology 28 

Publications 

Relation to Other Schools 13 

Religious Environment 17 

Requirements for Graduation 12 

Rural Courses 18 

Short Courses 35, 40 

Special Students 16 

Stenography and Typewriting 47 

Summer Schools 17 

Turnery 31 



BHWEBSnYOFUttOKU^ 



NORTH DAKOTA 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 

Ellendale, North Dakota 







Catalog Number 

June, 1916 



BISMARCK TRIBUNE PRINT 



CATALOG NUMBER 



North Dakota State Normal 

and 

Industrial School 




JUNE, 1916 
Vol. II No. 3 

Published Quarterly by the 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North Dakota 



Entered August 8. 1907, at Ellendale, No. Dak., under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



CALENDAR 

1916 

Fall Term, Thirteen Weeks 

Registration Tuesday, Sept. 19 and Wednesday, Sept. 20 

Class Work Begins Thursday, September 21 

Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., and Faculty Reception 

Saturday Evening, September 23 

Thanksgiving Holiday Thursday, November 30 

Fall Term Ends Thursday Evening, December 21 

1917 
Winter Term,, Twelve Weeks 

Registration, Tuesday, January 2, and Wednesday, January 3 

Class Work Begins Thursday, January 4 

Reception to Short Course Students, 

Saturday Evening, January 6 

Annual Military Contest Thursday, March 22 

Cadet Reception and Banquet Friday, March 23 

Winter Term Ends Friday Evening, March 23 

Spring Term, Eleven Weeks 

Registration of New Students Monday, March 26 

Class Work Begins Tuesday, March 27 

Annual Oratorical Contest Tuesday Evening, May 15 

Field Day and May Fete Saturday, May 19 

Junior-Senior Reception Saturday, June 2 

Baccalaureate Address Sunday, June 3 

Annual Declamatory Contest Monday, June 4 

Annual School Concert Tuesday, June 5 

Senior Class Play Wednesday, June 6 

Commencement, 10 :30 a. m Thursday, June 7 

President's Reception Thursday, June 7 

Alumni Reunion Friday, June 8 

Summer Term, Six Weeks 

Registration Monday, June 11 

Work Begins Tuesday, June 12 

Summer Term Ends Friday evening, July 20 



STATE BOARD OF REGENTS 

Hon. L. F. Crawford, President Sentinel Butte 

Hon. Frank White, Vice President Valley City 

Hon. J. D. Taylor Grand Forks 

Hon. Emil Scow Bowman 

Hon. J. A. Power Leonard 

Hon. Charles Brewer, Secretary Bismarck 

Miss Fanny C. Crawford, Local Secretary for the State 

Normal and Industrial School Ellendale 



FACULTY, 1915-1916 

R. M. BLACK, A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895; A. M., 
1910; Graduate student, University of Chicago; Professor 
in Red River Valley University, 1895-97, 1899-1903; Super- 
intendent of Wahpeton City Scools, 1903-5; County Su- 
perintendent of Richland County, 1905-9; Professor of His- 
tory and Political Science, State School of Science, 1909- 
14; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

President 

E. W. ACKERT, Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 
1899; B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901; A. B., Drake Uni- 
versity, 1907; Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1907. 

Mathematics 

W. G. BOWERS. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1905 ; A. M., Indiana State 
University, 1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1903-5 ; Principal of Schools, Lees- 
burg, O., 1905-6 ; Instructor in Science, Indiana Normal 
1906-7; Graduate student University of California, 1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1907. 

Physical Science 

CARRIE TUTTLE, A. B., Wittenberg College; Student in 
Library Economy, Chicago University. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1907. 

Librarian 

GABRIELLA C. BRENDEMUHL, A. B., Carleton College, 
1905; Phi Beta Kappa; Teacher of German and Precep- 
tress, Rochester Academy, 1905-08; High School Assistant 
Principal, 1908-10; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1910. 

German, English 



J. E. SWETLAND, A. B., Ripon College. All Wisconsin full- 
back (football) four seasons; All Wisconsin guard (bas- 
ketball). Holds college records in hurdles, shot, discus 
and hammer ; Instructor and coach Grand Rapids and Eau 
Claire High School, 1910-12; Eight years a member" of 
Wisconsin National Guard ; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1912. 

Athletic Director 
Military Science 

BEATRICE OLSON, B. A., University of North Dakota; Phi 
Beta Kappa ; Emerson College of Oratory, Boston ; Prin- 
cipal of High School, Rugby, N. D. ; Instructor English 
and Public Speaking, Fargo, N. D. ; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1913. 

Preceptress 

Head of English Department 

Public Speaking 

OLIN E. COMBELLICK. Graduate of Normal Department, 
Dakota University ; B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University ; 
Superintendent of Schools, 1907-1913; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1915 ; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1913. 

Director of Normal Department 

FLOYD C. HATHAWAY. B. S., South Dakota State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts ; student Parker 
College; student Minnesota School of Agriculture; gradu- 
ate student University of Wisconsin ; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1913. 

Agriculture 

L. B. FIELDS. M. E., Purdue University, 1907; Assistant in 
Practical Mechanics, Purdue University, 1905-07 ; Instruct- 
or in Mechanical Drawing and Pattern Making, Indiana In- 
dustrial School, 1907-10; Normal-Industrial School, 1910- 
12; Bellingham, Washington, City Schools, 1912-1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Director of Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 



TILDA R. NATWICK. Valley City Normal School; Stevens 
Point, Wisconsin Normal School; Student, Stout Institute; 
Principal of Schools, Embarrass, Wis., four years; Teach- 
er Domestic Science, Minto, N. D., 1911-1913; Domestic 
Science, Jamestown, N. D., City Schools, 1913-1915; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Home Economics 

GERTRUDE GIBBENS. B. S., North Dakota Agricultural 
College; Graduate Student, University of Colorado, 1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Home Economics 

JENNIE J. HARNSBERGER. Graduate Wisconsin State 
Normal School ; Teachers' Course, Art Institute, Chicago ; 
Crafts-Handicraft Guild, Minneapolis. Supervisor of 
Drawing, Albert Lea, Minnesota, 1906-12; Art Student, Chi- 
cago, 1912-13; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 
Drawing 
Fine Arts 

J. T. FULLER. B. A., Carleton College ,1897; Graduate Stu- 
dent University of Minnesota ; Superintendent of City 
Schools in Minnesota, 1897-1912; New Rockford, N. D., 
1912-15 ; Summer Training Schools in Minnesota, three 
years ; State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Psychology and Latin 

ALPHA HOLTE. State Normal-Industrial School, 1908. 
Graduate Columbia School of Music, Chicago, 1910. Super- 
visor of music in the city schools of Montrose, Colorado, 
1910-1913 ; Teacher of Voice in Western Slope Conserva- 
tory of Music, Montrose, 1910-12; Student of Harmony, 
under Rossitter Cole and special student in the Garst 
Vocal Studies in Voice Building and Interpretation, 1913- 
14; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 
Vocal Music 

JESSIE HOWELL. Student St. Mary's Hall, Faribault, Min- 
nesota. Piano teacher State Normal Industrial School, 
1909-11 ; student Cosmopolitan School of Music and Dra- 
matic Art, Chicago; Concert training in Berlin, 1910-1912. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 
Piano 



HERBERT BROWN. Dakota Wesleyan University. Univer- 
sity of South Dakota. Principal of Schools, Lennox, South 
Dakota; Principal of Schools, Harrisburg, S. D. ; Princi- 
pal of Schools, Napoleon, N. D., 1909-11. County Super- 
intendent of Logan County, 1911-1915. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1915. 

History and Education 

WALTER M. DEWEY. Western State Normal School, Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan, 1912. Special student, University of Wis- 
consin, 1913-1914 ; student, Stout Institute ; Supervisor of 
Manual Training, Norway, Michigan, 1912-1915. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Cabinet Making 
Manual Training 

RUSSELL R. McCLURG, B. S., M. Accts. Muncie Normal 
Institute, Muncie, Indiana, 1913 ; Indiana Public Schools, 
two years. Teacher in Business University, Indiana. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Commercial Arts 

EDNA MAE HARRIS. B. A. University of Wisconsin, 1913. 
Assistant Principal of High School, Bowman, N. D., 1913- 
1914. State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 
Director of Girls' Physical Training 

ROBERT PEARSON, B. S., North Dakota Agricultural Col- 
lege. Teacher of Farm Engineering, Crookston, Minn. 
State Normal and Industrial School (Winter term), 1916. 
Assistant in Farm Engineering 

MOLLIE C. MERKLEIN. Graduate of the Milwaukee Nor- 
mal School, Kindergarten Department; Wausau Kindergar- 
ten Training School. Student, University of Chicago. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 
Primary Critic 
F. B. PURDY, Superintendent of Ellendale City Schools. 
Director of Obsbervation in Teaching 

FANNY C. CRAWFORD. Salt City Business College, Hutch- 
inson, Kansas, 1914. State Normal and Industrial School, 
1914. 

Secretary to the President 
Registrar 



FRANCES L. BOOM, State Normal and Industrial School. 
Special Student in Music. 

Assistant in Piano 

HELEN WILSON. Student. State Normal and Industrial 
School. 

Assistant in Agriculture 



MRS. ELLA DUNCAN 



Matron 



J. G. HATFIELD. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



General Information 



PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE SCHOOL 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was 
established by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with 
a section of the state constitution providing for its creation. 
The revised law of 1907 relating to this school reads as fol- 
lows : 

"That the institution located at Ellendale, Dickey county, 
North Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial 
School, the object of such school being to provide instruction 
in a comprehensive way in wood and iron work and the vari- 
ous other branches of domestic economy as a co-ordinate 
branch of education, together with mathematics, drawing and 
the other school studies and to prepare teachers in the science 
of education and the art of teaching in the public schools with 
special reference to manual training." 

It is believed that with this broad but well denned mission 
the Normal and Industrial School offers superior advantages 
to the young people of the state. Educational thought of the 
day is constantly emphasizing more and more the practical 
and everyday duties and problems of life along with the pro- 
cesses of formal culture. This school is well located and 
abundantly equipped to give this many sided and full prepara- 
tion for complete life. 

A cordial invitation to visit the school is extended to all 
persons who may be interested in school work, and especially 
to those engaged in educational work. The school will wel- 
come inquiries concerning teachers trained in its different de- 
partments. There is a demand for such teachers and public 
school officials will find that it is the purpose of the admin- 
istration of the school to place its graduates so that they will 
serve the state with credit to themselves and the interests in- 
volved. 

LOCATION 

Ellendale, in which the State Normal and Industrial School 
is located, is a beautiful little city in the center of a good! 
agricultural region. It is the county seat of Dickey county, 



10 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

and is on both the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, and the 
Great Northern railways, and easy connections are made with 
the Soo Line, the Midland, and the Northern Pacific rail- 
ways. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the State Normal and Industrial School 
consists, of five main buildings, a foundry, a demonstration 
farm and an athletic field. 

DACOTAH HALL. This is a thoroly modern three story 
brick building and is an unusually attractive home for young 
women. The reception halls and society rooms are unusually 
pleasing. Here the young women of the school are surrounded 
by a stimulating and Christian influence. The purpose of the 
administration of the hall is to make it, not a boarding house, 
but a home, where every effort may be put forth to main- 
tain the amenities of life, which prevail in homes of influence, 
refinement and good cheer. It is believed that the social life 
which the hall offers is one of the most valuable parts of the 
student's education while here. The building is arranged to 
accommodate nearly one hundred students, and is modern thru- 
out, having a complete equipment of bathrooms, toilet rooms, 
steam heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are well 
lighted and well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by the 
students themselves. Each young lady intending to reside at 
tfye hall should bring at least three sheets, three pillow cases, 
blankets, towels, soap and napkins. Preference in choice of 
rooms is given in order of application. The health and com- 
fort of the students are the first consideration, and all mat- 
ters relating to food, hygiene and sanitation are carefully 
observed. 

Living expenses, including board, room, light, heat, and use 
of laundry and bath rooms, are $15.00 per month of four weeks. 
Table board is $3.25 per week. The rate is exceedingly low, 
when one considers the completeness of the service offered. 
The table board is excellent and the building is finely equipped. 
Single meals and meals to guests are 20 cents each. Bills are 
payable one month in advance. No discount is made for ab- 
sences of less than a week except in the case of regular vaca- 
tions, as indicated in the calendar. Students are required to 
take care of their own rooms. Mail is taken to the postoffice 
and delivered twice a day. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 11 

CARNEGIE HALL. This is a four story pressed brick 
structure, beautiful and commodious. In it are found the Nor- 
mal Department, Departments of Science, English, Mathematics, 
Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the Li- 
brary. In each department the equipment is such that stu- 
dents may reap the most generous returns from their efforts. 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Physiography are taught in 
laboratories in the most approved manner ; the Department of 
English has access to abundant literature, the Commercial De- 
partment is provided with typewriters, duplicators, Edison dic- 
tation phonograph records, etc. ; the Department of Music owns 
nine upright pianos for practice and teaching purposes and a 
Mason & Hamlin Baby Grand for concert playing and accom- 
panying in vocal music; the Department of Fine Arts is equip- 
ped with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, 
lockers, kiln for firing china, etc. ; the library is generously pro- 
vided with fiction, history, biography, scientific works, refer- 
ence texts, etc., is equipped with a card catalog and Poole's In- 
dex, and is gradually accumulating bound volumes of the stand- 
ard magazines. 

HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING. A three story red 
brick building houses the Department of Domestic Science and 
Art. The department occupies the entire upper floor, and the 
lower floor in part, and is equipped with sewing machines, 
charts, lockers, tables, desks, cooking utensils, ranges, individ- 
ual gas stoves and ovens. It also has the necessary demonstra- 
tion table, dishes, silverware, linen, glassware, etc., for the din- 
ing room. 

MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING. This is a two story red 
brick structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The departments of 
Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the up- 
per floor and are equipped with drafting benches, lathes, 
benches, individual and special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, 
tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the 
Department of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is 
equipped with - engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, 
hack saw, grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas en- 
gines is equipped with a twenty-five-horse-power Ideal engine, 
a twenty-horse-power horizontal side crank Howell engine, a 
twenty-horse-power automatic gasoline engine, a 'Case traction 
engine, a Gaar-Scott dismounted traction engine, a 15-30 gas 
tractor, a four-horse-power stationary engine and boiler com- 
plete for demonstration purposes, an International portable gas 



12 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

engine, a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine, calorimet- 
ers, Crosby steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction 
brake, water meter, injector, pumps, traps, boiler attachments, 
etc. 

ARMORY. This is a .'two story red brick building. The 
first floor is occupied in part by the locker rooms, and 1 in part 
by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft 
forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor consti- 
tutes the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with 
dumb bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bars, traveling rings, spring 
board, vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physi- 
cal training; and with shower baths and lockers. 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
buildings, has been reserved for a demonstration farm. One 
section has been fenced for cultivation. Each of the demon- 
stration strips averages one-tenth of an acre in area and has been 
carefully cultivated and valuable results have been obtained. 

ATHLETIC FIELD. The N-I Athletic Field is 288 feet 
wide by 336 feet long, enclosed, and' in it are found the base- 
ball diamond, foot-ball field, out-door basket-ball field, rifle 
range and grand stand. Here are held the out-of-door meets 
and the target practice of Company A. Three excellent tennis 
courts are maintained by a student-faculty tennis association. 

ADMISSION 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral char- 
acter, who has completed the common school course and re- 
ceived a diploma, will be admitted without examination. A 
preparatory course is maintained for those students who have 
not the home facilities for completing the eighth 'grade. Stu- 
dents incomplete in common school subjects must expect to 
make up work under special arrangement. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be 
admitted upon their credentials. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial de- 
partments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice 
of parents and teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. 
This choice having been once made, no pupil will be permitted 
to change his course or to drop a subject except for the most 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 13 

important considerations and then only upon recommendation 
of the instructor and consent of the president. A student who 
voluntarily drops a subject without proper authority will be 
dropped from all classes until officially reinstated. 

CREDITS 

The unit of credit is a term's work in a subject, three units 
of credit constituting a year's work in a subject. No credit is 
given for less than a term's work. Credit for summer school 
work will be given under arrangements satisfactory to the de- 
partments concerned. Credits are given in terms of percent- 
age, 75 per cent being the passing grade. 

The letter "I" is used to indicate .that work in a subject is 
incomplete and that a grade will be given when the required 
work is accomplished during the same or succeeding school 
year. The letter "C" is used to indicate that the work is so 
nearly up to a passing grade that the student may continufe 
the subject and when the work in the subject is satisfactorily 
completed a passing grade will ,be given for the term's work 
that was conditioned. The letter "F" is used to indicate fail- 
ure. The student receiving this mark must take the work over 
again to receive credit. 

In subjects requiring little or only occasional outside study, 
as shop work, cooking, etc., two periods of laboratory or reci- 
tation work are required daily to receive full credit. 

In the Acamedic Course four credit subjects are considered 
full work. In the other courses (except in the Farm Engineer- 
ing course) where there is considerable shop and laboratory 
work, five credit subjects constitute full' work. In exception- 
al cases more than five credit subjects may be taken by faculty 
permission. 

To obtain such permission the student must have demon- 
strated exceptional scholarship in previous work and must show 
study periods of one hour for each subject. 

GYMNASTICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied young 
men in Military Drill to conform to the state requirements as 
set forth in Chapter 167 of the Session Laws of 1909 : 

"The State Normal and Industrial School is authorized and 
required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Mili- 
tary Science, under such rules and regulations as the faculty 
of said institution may prescribe." 



14 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied students 
in gymnastics. In special cases and for good reasons students 
may be excused from military drill or gymnastics by vote of 
the faculty upon petition. 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

An eighth grade graduate may learn credits for an elemen- 
tary second grade certificate in one year and one summer ses- 
sion or credits for an elementary first grade certificate in two 
years. 

The holder of a good second grade certificate may earn cred- 
its for a first grade certificate (elementary) in one year or in 
two summer sessions. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in one year's work beyond a four- 
year high school course, entitles the holder to a second grade 
professional state certificate for two years, and after nine 
months' successful experience in teaching, the holder of this 
diploma is entitled to a second grade professional certificate 
valid for five years and renewable in the discretion of the 
State Board of Education which provides the foregoing regu- 
lations. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a four- 
year high school course, entitles the holder to a second grade 
professional certificate for two years, and after nine months' 
successful experience in teaching, the holder of this diploma 
is entitled to a second grade professional certificate valid for 
life. 

Graduates from the Mechanic Arts Course, Home Econom- 
ics Course, or Fine Arts Course, are entitled to a Special Cer- 
tificate, which entitles the holder to teach that special art in the 
schools of the state. 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made whereby graduates from this 
school are admitted to the following institutions with the 
standing indicated : 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. The State 
University of North Dakota admits graduates upon their cre- 
dentials, allowing full credit for courses completed and ad- 
vanced standing as follows: 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 15 

"(1) Students who have graduated from a four-year high 
school course and who have also graduated from a one-year 
professional course in an accredited Normal School are allowed 
one years credit (30 semester hours) on advanced standing. 

"(2) Graduates from the two-year North Dakota Normal 
Schools and Normal Schools having equal standing, who are 
also graduates of first-class high schools, will be granted 60 
units of advanced standing if they have completed all of the 
prescribed requirements for admission, and provided the sub- 
jects offered for advanced standing are in harmony with the 
group requirements for graduation. 

"(3) Students who are not high school graduates but have 
completed the regular four-year or five-year normal course are 
given 15 and 45 credits respectively on advanced standing (in- 
cluding in either case 4 credits in Psychology and 12 in Edu- 
cation.)" 

NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. The 
North Dakota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore 
year of its Agricultural and General Science Courses all grad- 
uates of this school. 

ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. Graduates of 
the Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trig- 
onometry are admitted to Armour Institute without examina- 
tion and receive three years' credit in shop work. 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping, are admitted 
without examination. 

Students of the State Normal-Industrial School are ad- 
mitted to other standard schools and colleges upon their cre- 
dentials. 



PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are 
open to all students for competition : 

(1) PRIZE IN ORATORY. The State Normal Industrial 
School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first 
place in oratory under such ! rules as a committee of the facul- 
ty may prescribe. A silver medal is offered to the student who 
wins second place in oratory. 

(2) MILITARY PRIZE. (First.) The State Normal and 
Industrial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins 



16 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

first place in individual drill at the annual military contest. 
Won in 1916, by Frank Callan. 

(3) MILITARY PRIZE. (Second.) A bronze medal of- 
fered by the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet 
winning second honors in the individual drill at the annual 
military contest. Won, in 1916, by Fred Smith-Peterson. 

(4) DECLAMATORY PRIZE. The State Normal and In- 
dustrial School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains 
first place in declamation under such rules as the faculty may 
prescribe. A second prize of a silver medal is offered the 
student winning second place. 

(5) ORIGINAL STORY PRIZE. This prize, given by 
the State Normal and Industrial School, is a gold medal, and 
is awarded to the student who prepares the best original short 
story. A silver medal will be awarded the student who pre- 
pares the second best original short story. The stories winning 
first and second prizes shall become the property of the school. 

(6) ESSAY PRIZE. Mr. B. Rosenthal offers $10.00 in 
cash to the young man who writes the best essay on "Why the 
Man Who Pays His Debts is Better off Financially Than the 
One Who j Does Not." Mr. Rosenthal requires that the sub- 
ject be brought out as a business proposition rather than a mor- 
al one, as the latter is taken for granted. 

(7) ESSAY PRIZE. Dr. M. F. Merchant offers $5.00 in 
cash to the student who writes the best essay on "The Cause 
of the Internal Troubles in Mexico." 

(8) PRIZE IN DOMESTIC ARTS. L. S. Jones & Com- 
pany offers $5.00 worth of merchandise, to be selected by the 
winner, to the young woman who does the best work in the 
making of a white waist. 

(9) PRIZE IN MECHANIC ARTS. The Weldun Com- 
pany offers a pocket knife to the young man who exhibits the 
best workmanship on a piece of furniture, to be no less com- 
plicated than a table or chair. 

Commencement Honors. The senior student who has the 
highest average grade in his class standings will be the vale- 
dictorian of his class. The student with second highest grades 
will receive second honors at commencement. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 17 



DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly con- 
duct, and prompt obedience to lawful authority are impera- 
tive. Fortunate is the school in which the sentiment of the 
student body commends manly conduct. This is the type of 
discipline most desired at this school. In no sense is the State 
Normal and Industrial School a reform school and students 
who fail to yield a full and cheerful compliance to all re- 
quirements necessary for successful work and the honor of the 
school will be promptly dismissed. Discipline is educative 
when reasonable and intelligible. This is the guiding thought 
with which all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

An incidental fee of $5.00 a term is charged all students, ex- 
cept those taking only special lessons in music and fine arts. 
This amount includes all miscellaneous fees charged in former 
years, but does not include materials in home economics and 
manual training consumed for personal use, which are charged 
to the student at cost. 

Fees for private lessons in music are $12.00 for a term of 
twelve lessons. Private lessons in fine arts are $9.00 for a 
term of twelve lessons. Piano rent is $3.00 per. term of three 
months. 

Extra fee for late registration, fifty cents, except in cases of 
a student's first enrollment for the year. 

Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $3.75 per week, payable 
by the month, in advance. Good room and board may be had 
in private families at prices ranging from $4 per week upwards. 
Many students rent rooms and board themselves. Board and 
room rent, the chief items of expense, range from $120 to 
$150 per year of 36 weeks. 

The following deposit fees (subject to return) are required 
of those using the material: Drawing set, $7.50; locker key, 
twenty-five cents ; chemistry breakage, $2.00. 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has 
been set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is 
open to all students until 5 :00 o'clock school days. Arrange- 
ments are made by which students can draw books for use at 
times when the library is closed. 



18 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and 
catalogued ; a cabinet card catalogue ; bound volumes of the 
leading magazines ; Poole's index ; congressional records, gov- 
ernment reports and much other valuable material. New addi- 
tions are constantly being made. Each department of the 
school has a well selected line of books for reference work. 
The leading magazines and newspapers are at the disposal of 
students. A trained librarian is in charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program, may, 
upon recommendation of the classification committee, arrange 
for special work. All such students, however, must satisfy the 
committee that their preparation is sufficient to bring them 
properly within the entrance requirements. No student deemed 
deficient in the fundamentals will be permitted to elect the arts 
exclusively, but a fair balance will be maintained between so- 
called intellectual and manual training subjects. 

LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are three literary societies maintained for the purpose 
of affording practice in speaking in public and to train in de- 
bating. 

The Alphian is the organization of the young women, and the 
Sigma Pi Iota and Mechanic Arts Society those of the young 
men. 

Two glee clubs, the "Schubert" (young women) and the "Or- 
pheus" (young men) and an orchestra are maintained. The 
course in music in public schools has been considerably en- 
larged and made more interesting and valuable to the student 
in reference to general education. Several recitals and concerts 
are given during the year. A year's credit in music may be 
earned by faithful work in band, orchestra or glee club, the 
number of credits to be earned in this way being limited to a 
total of three. 

YOUNG WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A 
voluntary organization which aims to promote Christian life 
among the young women of the school. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A branch 
of the Young Men's Christian Association is maintained under 
the management of the students. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 19 

ATHLETICS. Foot-ball, basket-ball, base-ball and track ath- 
letics are organized and games are played under supervision 
of the faculty. A regular athletic director is employed, who has 
charge of all athletic activities. The coach and captains of the 
teams for 1915-1916 are: 

J. E. Swetland Athletic Director 

Floyd Brown Captain of Foot-ball Team 

Arthur Strutz Captain of Basket-ball Team 

LeRoy Pease Captain of Base-ball Team 

ENTERTA1N3IENT COURSE 

A splendid entertainment course is maintained by the school. 
For 1916^17 the following are some of the numbers chosen: 
Bohemur Kryl and Company ; The Killarney Girls and Rita 
Rich ; The American Quartet ; Smith Damren, the Potter Crafts- 
man ; Julius Caesar Nayphe ; Gay Zenola MacLaren. 

A student rate of half price for a season ticket is made, the 
regular price of season tickets being two dollars and fifty cents. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

A joint summer school is maintained comprising the coun- 
ties of Sargent, Emmons, Mcintosh, Logan and Dickey. A 
six weeks' session immediaely following the regular school year 
is held. Students and teachers may take work and earn cred- 
its to be applied toward the completion of any course. A 
special summer school bulletin in published, announcing the 
work of this session of the school. A copy may be obtained 
for the asking. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of the city take a deep interest in 
the students, many of whom are identified with their activities. 
Students are urged to attend the church of their choice. Bible 
study classes covering the state high school syllabus are main- 
tained by the various church organizations of the city. These 
are under competent leaders and students who successfully pur- 
sue the course may earn a half years credit to be accepted as 
an elective in any course. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Study this catalogue thoroughly. 

Be present the first day of the term. 



20 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Bring with you such text books as you may have. 

Write the president that you are coming. 

Come with a determination to make this school year the best 
year of your life. 

Bring a letter of recommendation from your pastor or teach- 
er. This is not required, but serves as a letter of introduction. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The following courses of study have been carefully arranged 
to comply with the laws of the state and the regulations of 
the state board of education. 

Unless otherwise specified all subjects require five recita- 
tions per week. Two laboratory or shop periods are required 
for one period of credit. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



21 



RURAL ELEMENTARY NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a second grade elementary certficate. 



Fall Winter Spring 

Eng. I. (Gram) English I. English I. 

Lit. of Grades Geography Geography 

Arithmetic Arithmetic Pen. & Spell. 

U. S. History U. S. History Pedagogy 

Elective Elective Elective 

Drill or Gym. Drill or Gym. Drill or Gym. 



Summer 
Language V 2 
Grammar y 2 
^Physiology 
*Civics 
*Two daily 
recitations 



TWO YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a first grade elementary certificate 

FIRST YEAR 

Winter Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
U. S. History 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Algebra 
Botany 
Elem. Psych. 
Elective 
uriil or Gym. 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Lit. of Grades 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
U.S. History 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Physiology 

Normal Grammar 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Pedagogy 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Civics 

Elem. Psych. 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Note. — The elective in the elementary normal courses must 
be chosen from the following: Public School Music, Drawing, 
Agriculture, Manual Training, Home Economics. 



22 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



FOUR YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Eng. I (Gram.) 

Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (i/ 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (y 2 ) 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Normal Grammar 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (V 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (%) 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

American History 
Psychology 
School Admin. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Pen. & Spell. 

P. S. Music (V 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (y 2 ) 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Political Science 
Psvchology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



23 



FIVE TEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 
English I. 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Normal Grammar 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

American History 

Physics 

Psychology 



American History 

Physics 

Psychology 

Latin I or German I Latin I or German I 



Elective 
Gymnasium 



Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Lat. II or Germ. 
Elective 
Elective 



II 



Elective 
Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR 

School Admin. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Elective 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Pen. & Spell. 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Political Science 

Physics 

Psychology 

Latin I or German I 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Lat. II or Germ. II 
Elective 
Elective 



24 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



ONE YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Normal Grammar 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Electitve 
Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 

Psychology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Electitve 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

Psychology 
School Admin. 
Rev. & Meth. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Electitve 
Drill or Gym. 



TWO YEAR NORMAL BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 

Psychology 

Normal Grammar 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Hist, of Ed. 

Adv. Pedagogy 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 

Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

Prin. of Ed. 

Obs. & Teaching 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



School Admin. 

Obs. & Teaching 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



In the two year normal course for high school graduates the 
major elective will determine the course from which the stu- 
dent receives his diploma. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



25 



NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Eng. I. (Gram.) 
General Science 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Cookery I. (y 2 ) 
Sewing I. (V 2 ) 
Gymnasium 


English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Cookery I. (%) 

Sewing I. (V 2 ) 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR 


English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Cookery I. (y 2 ) 
Sewing I. (V 2 ) 
Gymnasium 


English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Gymnasium 


English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR 


English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. English III. English III. 

PI. Geom. PI. Geom. PI. Geom. 

Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry 

Normal Grammar Rev. and Meth. Rev. and Meth. 

H. H. Management H. H. Management Home Nursing 

Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium 



American History 
Psychology 
Art Needlework 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 



Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Special Methods 



Cookery II. (i/ 2 ) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Elective 



FOURTH YEAR 

American History 
Psychology 
Millinery 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 

FIFTH YEAR 

Prin. of Ed. 

Teaching 

Nutritional 

Physiology 

Dietetics 
Cookery II. (V 2 ) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Elective 



Political Science 
Psychology 
Textiles 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 



School Admin. 
Observation 
Home and Social 
Economy 

Cookery II. (V 2 ) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Elective 



26 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
General Science 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Man. Tr. I. 
Drill 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Physiology 
Man. Tr. II. 
Drill 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. III. 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Solid Geom. 

Psychology 
Physics 
Man. Tr. IV 
Gymnasium 



Ap. Mechanics 
Hist, of Ed. 
Electricity 
Cost Keeping 
Man. Tr. V. 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Man. Tr. I. 

Drill 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Man. Tr. II. 

Drill 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. III. 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

American History 

Solid. Geom. (y 2 ) 

Adv. Algebra (%) 

Psychology 

Physics 

Man. Tr. IV. 

Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR 

Engines 
Prin. of Ed. , 
Electricity 
Teaching 
Man. Tr. V. 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Man. Tr. I. 
Drill 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Man. Tr. II. 

Drill 



English III. 

PL Geom. 

Method & Reviews 

Chemistry 

Man. Tr. III. 

Gymnasium 



Political Science 

Adv. Algebra 
Psychology 
Physics 
Man. Tr. IV 
Gymnasium 



Ap. Mechanics 
School Admin. 
Electricity 
Special Methods 
Man. Tr. V. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



27 



MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
General Science 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts 
Drill 



II. 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 



English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 
Mech. Arts 
Drill 



II. 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 
SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Mech. Arts II. 

Drill 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 

PI. Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 
FOURTH YEAR 

American History 

Solid Geom. (%) 

Adv. Algebra (%) 

Physics 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR 

Engines 

Trig. & Surv. 

Elective 

Electricity 

Mech. Arts V. 

Electives : English IV, Latin or German, Fine Arts, Com- 
mercial Arts, Industrial Physics or Advanced Mechanic Arts 
(Mechanic Arts V), Music. 

Mechanic Arts V : One year's work selected from the fol- 
lowing: Carpentry and Building, Building Construction, Join- 
ery and Cabinet-Making, Concrete Construction, Electric Wir- 
ing, -Machine Shop Practice, Interior Finishing and Painting, 
Engines, Blacksmithing, Machine Drawing, Architectural Draw- 
ing, and Plumbing and Steam Fitting. 



English III. 

PI. Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 

American History 
Solid 'Geom. 

Physics 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 

Ap. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Cost Keeping 
Electricity 
Mech. Arts V. 



English III. 

PI. Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 

Political Science 

Adv. Algebra 

Physics 

Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium 

Ap. Mechanics 
Trig. & Surv. 
Elective 
Electricity 
Mech. Arts V. 



28 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
General Science 
Cookery I. (%)• 
Sewing I. (y 2 ) 
Gymnasium 



English II.. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 

Physiology 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. 
Elective 

Art Needlework 
Chemistry 
Household 
Management 



Cookery II. (V 2 ) 
Sewing II. (%) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Elective 



Elective 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter Term 

English I. 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Cookery I. (V2) 

Sewing I. (y 2 ) 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR 

English II.. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
Elective 
Millinery 
Chemistry 
Household 
Management 

FOURTH YEAR 

Cookery II. (%) 
Sewing II. (%) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Nutritional 

Physiology 

Dietetics 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Agriculture 

Elective 

Elective 

Cookery I. (y 2 ) 

Sewing I. (y 2 ) 

Gymnasium 



English II.. 
Ancient History 
Algebra 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. 
Elective 
Textiles 
Chemistry 
Home Nursing 



Cookery II. (V 2 ) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Home and Social 

Economy 

Elective 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



29 



COMMERCIAL-ACADEMIC COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Economic History 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Business English 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Algebra 

Commercial Geog. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

Geometry 
Ancient History 
Commercial Law 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

English III. 
American History 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Comm. Arithmetic 

Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling- 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Commercial Geog. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Raw Materials 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gvmnasium 



English III. 
Political Science 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
American History 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium Gymnasium 

If Bookkeeping be taken in the first two years then language 
may be taken as the elective. If shorthand is taken, then the 
typewriting should be taken. 

Certain regulations have been adopted regarding the Com- 
mercial-Academic Course, with which the student must make 
himself familiar. An enrollment in these courses must be made 
by the Director of the Commercial Department. 



30 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Ancient History 

Latin I or Germ. 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 



ACADEMIC COURSE 

FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Ancient History 

Latin I or Germ. 1 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Ancient History 

Latin I or Germ. 1 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 



Lat. II or Germ. II Lat. II or Germ. II Lat. II or Germ. II 



Drill or Gym. 



Di 



or Gym. 
THIRD YEAR 



Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English IV. 
American History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 
English IV. 
American History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English 
Political 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



IV. 
Science 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



31 



TWO YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE 



Fall Term 
English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Economic History 
Business English 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter Term 
English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Commercial Law 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 
English I. 
Comm. Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Civics 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 



(Two Winter Terms) 



First Year 
Short Course English 
Farm Arithmetic 
Agriculture 
Farm Mechanics I. 
Carpentry (%) 
Blacksmithing (y 2 ) 
Engine Lectures 
Gymnasium 



Second Year 
Business Papers and English 
Farm Accounting 
Farm Mechanics II. 
Carpentry II. (V 2 ) 
Blacksmithing II. (%) 
Steam and Gas Engines and 

Boilers 
Mechanical Drawing (*/£) 
Machine Shop Practice (%) 
Gymnasium 



32 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



SHORT COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

(Two Winter Terms) 



First Year 
Short Course English 
Short Course Arithmetic 
Cooking (4 da.) 
Food Study (1 da.) 
Sewing 

Art Needlework 
Gymnasium 



Second Year 
Dressmaking 
Cooking II. 
Textiles and Basketry 
Home Nursing 
Household Management 
Gymnasium 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 33 



Description of Courses 

EDUCATION AND NORMAL COURSES 

One of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public school 
conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other re- 
quirement relating to education is of such pressing importance. 
The Act which defines the mission of the State Normal and 
Industrial School requires it to train teachers "in the science 
of education and the art of teaching in the public schools, with 
special reference to manual training." 

ELEMENTARY PEDAGOGY. A brief course in the prin- 
ciples and methods of teaching and general school management 
offered to students who are unable to remain in school a suf- 
ficient length of time to complete a full course. This course 
includes a brief study of the presentative, representative and 
reflective powers ; the ends of education ; the means ; the prin- 
ciples involved; general methods; methods in particular 
branches, etc. 

ELEMENTARY PSYCHOLOGY. Two terms of elemen- 
tary psychology are required in the two year Normal Course 
leading to a first grade elementary certificate. The work con- 
sists of a general study of the characteristics and laws of men- 
tal life and the functions of the various mental processes. A 
brief course in physiological psychology is included. 

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOY. One year is devoted to this 
subject, which is required in all courses leading to a second 
grade professional certificate. The first two terms are given 
to a general study of the subject similar to the course in ele- 
mentary psychology, but more comprehensive. The third term 
is devoted to child study. The two terms of elementary psy- 
chology will be accepted in lieu of the first term of advanced 
psychology. 

HISTORY OF EDUCATION. A study of the educational 
systems of the chief nations of antiquity ; education in its re- 
lation to Christianity ; the Renaissance, the Reformation and 



34 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

the forces operative in our own era ; a study of the life and 
practices of the chief educational reformers in the light of 
prevailing theories. Numerous outside readings and class re- 
views are required. 

PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION. A broad conception of 
the principles of education is here presented. Especial attention 
is given to such themes as the functions of teaching and of 
subject matter, motivation, correlation, concentration, etc. The 
aim is to familiarize the student with such principles of educa- 
tion as will enable him to meet intelligently problems of class 
room instruction. A professional thesis is required of each one 
completing this course. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. This course is to consider 
problems of importance not ordinarily met in the class room 
instruction. The relationship of officers, teachers, parents, and 
pupils as well as questions of organization and administration 
pertaining to the state law, course of study, daily programs, ex- 
aminations, promotions and matters of discipline will be dis- 
cussed. 

PRIMARY METHODS. A course designed especially for 
those who anticipate teaching in the primary grades. Indus- 
trial work, story telling, phonetic reading, primary songs and 
number work is emphasized from the view point of daily plans. 
The work is principally lectures and students are required to 
make carefully written reports. 

ADVANCED PEDAGOGY. This is especially for Senior 
students who enroll for observation and teaching. It is de- 
signed to meet the problems peculiar to the observation and 
teaching work. 

LITERATURE IN THE GRADES. This consists of a care- 
ful study of some of the classics required by the state course 
of study for the grades. In this work the aim is to bring out 
not only the thought, but also the beauty, form and manner of 
the presentation and make the prospective teacher familiar 
with the subject matter of reading. 

GEOGRAPHY. Two terms' work is required in Normal 
courses. This includes a review of descriptive, political and 
commercial geography with methods of teaching. Some study 
is also made of the elements of mathematical and physical 
geography. 

REVIEWS AND METHODS. The subject matter of arith- 
metic, reading, language, grammar, history and geography re- 




I— I 

Q 
►4 

3 

PQ 

in 
U 

i— i 

o 

o 
o 

w 

w 
o 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 35 

viewed ; the principles and methods of teaching emphasized. 
The work is especially designed to train students to teach. The 
subject matter, teacher's aim, method, preparation and presen- 
tation are carefully considered with special reference to the 
grades. 

OBSERVATION AND TEACHING. Designed to train 
prospective teachers in the principles and methods of effective 
teaching. The opportunity for observation and teaching is 
found in the classes of the preparatory department, the depart- 
ment of manual training, and the department of domestic 
science and arts. Both observation and teaching take place 
under the direct supervision of a trained teacher, who is thor- 
oughly capable not only of directing the efforts of pupil-teach- 
ers, but of offering the most helpful and painstaking criticism. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY. A course which considers the prob- 
lems of the rural community and especially the teacher's rela- 
tion to these problems. The school as a factor in community 
interests, and the reaction of teacher and community upon their 
common fields will be considered. This will be largely an in- 
vestigation course primarily for seniors in the normal courses, 
but is open to others with sufficient preparation to carry the 
work. Given in the winter and summer terms. 



MECHANIC ARTS 

The purpose is two-fold : 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity 
for specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 

Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual 
arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this 
work; no other school in the state is so well equipped. The 
shops and laboratories are well supplied with every modern 
appliance which can aid in acquiring practical knowledge of 
industrial subjects. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student work 
done in this department. 

Mechanic Arts I. 

1. JOINERY. 

a. Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, 
chisel, hammer, square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and 



36 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



other hand tools, in the construction of the principal joints 
employed in carpentry and joinery. 

b. When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, use- 
ful articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the 
student. 

c. Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as 
a desk, table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in 
order that they may make further application of the principles 
they have learned. 

d. Advanced cabinet making ; practice in the application of 
the principles of joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, 
settees, stands, pedestals, and cabinets of various designs. 
Pieces to be finished in approved manner. 

2. ELEMENTARY CABINET MAKING. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instru- 
ments, with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

c. Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in 
mechanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of con- 
struction. 

d. Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of 
planes in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive 
geometry, is the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. 
In connection with it students are required to bring to class 
shop sketches or freehand drawings of various articles. In- 
strumental drawings are made from some of these sketches. 

Mechanic Arts II. 
I. FORGING. 

a. Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming an- 
gles from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms 
of welding iron and mild steel. 

b. This course includes a number of useful articles, such as 
a bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, 
clevis, cold chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and 
hammer. 

Special attention is given to the study of the manufacture 
of different grades of steel, its hardening and tempering. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making 
and tempering machine tools. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 37 

2. FOUNDRY PRACTICE. 

Molding and core work ; melting and casting iron and brass ; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices ; the mixing 
of iron; the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting of 
brass and other soft metals. 

Students make all castings for machine shop work. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental draw- 
ings, made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

c. Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

Mechanic Arts III. 

1. TURNERY. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises 
thru which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, con- 
cave curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow 
turning, together with exercises combining either a number, or 
all, of these operations. 

Useful articles in which the principles learned in (a) are ap- 
plied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for various 
tools, a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair bal- 
usters and various other useful articles. This work is carried 
further in its application in pattern making. 

2. PATTERN MAKING. 

In all this work espedal consideration is necessarily given to 
the work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made 
of a number of models which involve the more elementary 
problems in foundry practice ; these are followed by patterns 
of parts of machines, including a hand-wheel and blanks for 
a cam, gear-wheel and bevel-gear. 

3. ADVANCED CABINET MAKING. 

4. MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

a. Sheet Metal Patterns. Graphical methods of solving 
problems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their applica- 
tion in sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns 
of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All ar- 
ticles in this course of which patterns are made, are constructed 
either of metal or paper. 



38 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

b. Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story 
frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is made 
very practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the 
floor, basement and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sec- 
tional wall views showing the construction ; and at least two 
views of the completed structure — the drawing including roof 
plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are 
drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building materials 
and labor is made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the 
complete set of plans. Special students are carrying this work 
further and are actually building models in the shop, in which 
the methods of construction are identical with those used in 
actual house building. 

Mechanic Arts IV. 

1. CHIPPING AND FILING. 

a. Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill 
in the use of the file and the cold chisel. These tools are of 
especial value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for 
instance, in erecting and repairing machinery, whether in the 
shop or on the farm. Their usefulness is so well known, and 
the inability of the average man to use them propertly is also 
so well known, that it seems proper to give them especial at- 
tention in this course. 

b. In connection with, and in addition to the above, a num- 
ber of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 

2. MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE. 

a. Machine tool making. Students make and temper the 
tools which they will use in their machine tool practice. 

b. Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms 
of machine tools, directions for operating machines and keep- 
ing tools in order ; practice in centering and in plain, taper, 
and template turning, chucking, drilling, boring, external and 
internal thread cutting; hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

c. Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, microm- 
eter and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps 
and dies, machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In 
this course the machine work is done on the articles cast in 
the foundry during the preceding year. The greater share of 
the machine tool practice of the entire course cons : sts in ma- 
chining the products of the foundry. 

d. Class to do the machining and erecting of a small en- 



NORMAL .AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 39 

gine, a lathe, or some other project involving similar opera- 
tions. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Lettering and conventional representations of frequently 
recurring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, 
etc. 

b. Machine sketching and dimensioning. Sketches in pro- 
jection of complete machines or of detailed parts, with correct 
dimensions supplied from measurements. Sketches to be neat 
and clear and dimensions properly placed. 

c. Working drawings from sketches. Finished working 
drawings from sketches in preceding course. Some drawings 
to be inked, others to be traced and from the tracings blue 
prints made. 

d. Machine design. Students to make original design of me- 
chanical appliance or machine. 

Mechanic Arts V. 

1. APPLIED MECHANICS. The object of this course is 
to provide students with a practical statement of the principles 
of Mechanics essential to an intelligent interest in the con- 
structive arts. It embraces a study of simple framed structures, 
strength of materials, beams, riveted joints, shafts, springs, ele- 
mentary mechanism, simple machines, and hydraulics. 

2. ENGINES AND BOILERS. The purpose of this term's 
work is to introduce to the Mechanic Arts student the general 
elementary principles of gas engines, and steam engines and 
boilers. A text is used, supplemented by work with engines in 
the laboratory. 

3. ELECTRICITY. One year of elementary work in elec- 
tricity beyond that given in physics is required of all mechanic 
arts students. Direct and alternating current machines and 
appliances ; carrying capacity and resistance of conductors ; 
wirng formulae and methods of installation; batteries, accu- 
mulators and theory of the magnetic circuit are some of the 
subjects briefly covered. A text book is used in connection 
with lectures and drafting room work. 

4. COST-KEEPING, METHODS AND REVIEWS AND 
SPECIAL METHODS. Only one term each of the above sub- 
jects is required from all students pursuing the Normal Man- 
ual Training Course. Mechanic Arts students take only cost- 
keeping. 



40 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Cost-keeping, as applied to the manual training shop, with 
the making of estimates is about the extent of this work, 
which applies equally well to other shops. 

One term of Methods and Reviews, given in the Normal de- 
partment. See under Normal Courses. Special Methods is 
a subject largely professional with the manual training teacher 
and treats particularly of his or her problems concerning differ- 
ent systems and methods of presenting the subject. 

5. TEACHERS' MANUAL TRAINING. For students tak- 
ing Normal-Manual Training Course. 

(a) Hand-work for Primary Grades. 

1. PAPER AND CARDBOARD CONSTRUCTION. This 
work is taken up as it should be presented in the public schools. 
The different steps in paper folding are given, developing into 
the construction of familiar articles. The use of paste and 
scissors is developed early in the course. Freehand cutting 
is g'ven for training the eye in regard to form and for com- 
position. Portfolios, booklets, boxes, etc., are constructed of 
heavy paper and cardboard. 

2. CLAY MODELING AND POTTERY. Some train- 
ing is given in modeling type forms from simple objects in 
nature. The greater share of the time is devoted to the mak- 
ing of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces in- 
volving different methods of construction. In the third and 
fourth grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class is 
instructed in the craft of mould-made pieces and a few pieces 
are made by the class. Students glaze a part of their work. 

3. WEAVING AND BASKETRY. Weaving begins with 
the use of paper mats, different patterns being worked out in 
several media. The materials included are raffia, jute, common 
wool yarns and, for the fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of 
the finest quality. Problems include pencil bags, book bags, 
holders, mats, special designed rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. 
Basketry consists of the problems used in elementary grades, 
simple rattan mats and baskets, handles, hinges, etc. Coiled 
mats and smple baskets are executed and a few methods of 
using raffia and constructive work are illustrated. 

4. THIN WOOD CONSTRUCTION. The assembling of 
thin pieces of wood by means of glue and braids to form minia- 
ture pieces of furniture; the construction of a miniature house. 
The work consists, in part, of a combination of wood and card- 
board. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 41 

b. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 

(1) WOODWORK FOR FOURTH AND FIFTH 
GRADES. The purpose here is to train the prospective teacher 
in the simpler processes in wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction 
intended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, 
they are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, 
for original design. The work is similar in character to courses 
offered in the elementary grades of any first class public school 
system. The tools used are the knife, block plane, back saw. 
coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, 
hammer, rule and pencil. For most of the exercises the ma- 
terial is prepared in thickness before being given to the stu- 
dent. Workmanlike methods are aimed at ; blue prints of the 
course are made. 

(2) WOODWORK FOR THE SIXTH, SEVENTH AND 
EIGHTH GRADES. Here serious attention is first given to 
following the methods of the skilled mechanic. It is the aim 
to keep always in mind the interest and capacity of the pupils 
being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the 
public schools where there is an equipment of workbenches 
and a rather full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth grades 
there are numerous exercises in cabinet making in which the 
simpler methods of joinery are involved. The. use of sand- 
paper, files, stains and varnish is introduced in finishing some 
of the pieces. 

c. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full 
Mechanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive 
exercises in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construc- 
tion, Wood Carving, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and De- 
sign. 

(1) MANUAL TRAINING DESIGN. Study of the ele- 
ments of design, line, dark and light and color and the appli- 
cation of the principles of harmony. The object of the instruc- 
tion is to develop appreciation through the study of art-struc- 
ture. The course begins with design in the abstract, har- 
monious arrangement of spaces being given special attention. 
Application of the theory of design in technical problems ; de- 
signs for furniture ; textiles, wall coverings, stained glass, in- 
teriors, etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 



42 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 

This course is planned to meet the most practical require- 
ments of young men on the up-to-date farm. A certificate of 
proficiency will be given upon a satisfactory completion of the 
work. The course includes the following subjects: 

INDUSTRIAL ARITHMETIC. The work will involve fac- 
tors, fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, practical meas- 
urements, etc. Problems dealing with such subjects as mar- 
keting, measurements of walls, crops, cost of fences, buildings, 
silos, rations. 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH, (a) The course in Gram- 
mar is intended to give the students basis for oral and written 
composition. (b) The course in Language and Grammar, 
more elementary than course (a), is intended to give pupils 
a correct working knowledge of written and spoken English, 
(c) The course in Letter Composition is primarily for the 
young men, and includes such letters as the average farmer is 
obliged to write. Penmanship, spelling, punctuation, as well 
as form and expression of thought are emphasized, (d) The 
course in Reading is planned to give an acquaintance with cur- 
rent industrial literature related to other subjects of the 
course. The selections read are chosen for their practical util- 
ity, and getting the thought will receive more attention than 
formal expression. 

The student taking one of the short courses is expected to 
elect one or more of these courses, selection to be made on 
approval of enrolling officer. 

AGRICULTURE. An elementary study of the different 
kinds of soils, soil and water, the germination of seeds, require- 
ments in the growth of seedlings, conservation of moisture, 
soil fertility, rotation of crops, varieties of stock and stock 
breeding. 

FARM MECHANICS I. Study and application of levers, 
resultant of forces, work, energy, friction, velocity, mass . and 
combinations, pulleys and mechanical advantage. 

CARPENTRY I. Care and use of tools, forms of joints em- 
ployed in making articles for the home and farm. Timber 
splices ; construction of modern farm gates, etc. Cutting of 
simple rafters and simple framing. 

BLACKSMITHING 1. Alternates with the class in Car- 
pentry I, and consists of the care of the forge fire, drawing, 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 43 

upsetting, bending, swaging and the different forms of welding 
iron. A part of this work will consist of lectures covering the 
processes of the manufacture of iron and steel, with methods 
of hardening and tempering. 

ENGINE LECTURES. First term subject and consists of 
the study of the growth and development of steam and gas 
engines, types and efficiency ; forms of governors ; two and 
four cycle engines ; cooling and ignition systems ; lubrication. 
Laboratory study when necessary. 

FARM ACCOUNTING. A short course in bookkeeping, 
dealing especially with farm transactions. The shortest, most 
simple way of keeping accounts, the taking of inventories and 
the means of learning the exact state of the business receive 
special attention. 

BUSINESS PAPERS AND ENGLISH. In this course the 
proper forms of ordinary business papers will be studied with 
a view to ascertaining the rights of the parties to business 
transactions and the use and meaning of business forms. Some 
exercises in English writing will be given. 

FARM MECHANICS II. Hoists, transmission of power by 
belts, cables, chain, gears and shafting, hitches, rope splices, 
and lacing of belts. This course involves a great amount of 
applied mathematics and note book work. 

CARPENTRY II. A continuation of Carpentry I; construc- 
tion of door and window frames; cutting of hip and jack raft- 
ers; inside finishing and cabinet work. 

BLACKSMITHING II. Alternates with Mechanical Draw- 
ing. A continuation of Blacksmithing I, in the making of 
punches, chisels, shaping and tempering machine tools, laying 
plow shares and practical horse shoeing. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING. A brief practical course with 
special reference to the drafting of plans for farm apparatus 
and structures. Farm building plans and plans for the location 
of farm structures will receive attention. 

STEAM AND GAS ENGINES, BOILERS. Second term 
work, a continuation of Engine Lectures ; largely laboratory 
practice. Study in adjustment of working parts; use of indi- 
cator; brake and indicated tests; methods of boiler feed; effic- 
iency test of small steam plant. Opportunity will be given for 
the study of special problems. 



44 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE. Alternates with advanced 
carpentry. The student will he given instruction in chipping and 
filing, with practice in shaping and setting machine tools, also 
practice in the manipulation of modern metal working machines. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

This department aims to meet the needs of two classes of 
students : 

1. To fit graduates to teach Domestic Science and Domestic 
Art in the grades and High School. 

2. Special students or students of the regular courses who 
desire to secure training as a preparation for home life in its 
larger significance. 

COOKERY I. This course aims to give practice in cooking 
the more fundamental foods and in serving simple meals. Suf- 
ficient repetition of processes is given to secure a fair degree 
of manipulation of materials and utensils. 

It also includes a study of the food materials, growth, pro- 
duction, manufacture, adulteration, costs, composition, digesti- 
bility and nutritive value. 

COOKERY II. The second course in cookery provides ad- 
ditional practice in work with foods and emphasizes the pro- 
fessional aspect of the work. The student is trained not only 
to obtain good results in housekeeping and cookery, but also 
to think and work with the view of presenting the subject mat- 
ter to others. 

Emphasis is also placed on preservation of fruits and veget- 
ables, preparation of foods in season and in large quantities. 
They make a study of proper combinations of foods both from 
the nutritive and the aesthetic standpoint. A study is made 
of the principles and methods of serving both formal and in- 
formal meals most efficiently. Each student plans and executes 
a luncheon for six people for a special cost per plate. The 
marketing is done by the student and the caloric value must 
be carefully figured. 

Each student is required to plan, work up and present a dem- 
onstration lecture on some phase of cookery. 

This course also considers invalid cookery. Dishes are pre- 
pared for certain diseases, and dainty and attractive serving 
of invalid trays is fully considered. 

HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT. Under this course vari- 
ous topics are considered. It aims to give the students an in- 
sight into the complexities of the modern household, and to 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 45 

fit them to organize and successfully cope with the problems 
concerned with the administration of household affairs. 

The course begins with a brief survey of the evolution of 
the home and leads to the planning of a home for an approxi- 
mate amount to suit the needs of a given family, with especial 
attention given to saving the strength and time of the house- 
keeper. Special study is made of the plumbing, heating and 
lighting systems, also of the furnishing and decorating of the 
home to meet artistic, economic and sanitary requirements. It 
further considers the organization and management of the mod- 
ern household with its relation to economy and that in turn to 
efficiency. 

HOME NURSING. 

The design of this course is to give a practical knowledge 
for the general care of cases of illness in the home. It fur- 
nishes instruction in simple emergencies and accidents which 
may occur in the home or elsewhere. 

Practical work is supplemented wherever possible. A text 
book is used. 

NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY. This course emphasizes the 
physiology of nutrition. One course in physiology is a prere- 
quisite. It gives the student the scientific principles upon which 
to base his study of Dietetics. 

DIETETICS. Attention is given to the problems of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the infant, the 
adolescent, the adult and the aged in both sickness and health. 
The working out of the energy value of the various food 
materials and the energy requirements of individuals living 
under specific conditions. 

SPECIAL METHODS. This course considers the profes- 
sional aspect of Home Economics. It aims to organize the 
practical information needed by a teacher in introducing or con- 
ducting the work. Methods of teaching are studied with ref- 
erence to the preparation and presentation of lessons, class and 
laboratory management. 

Careful consideration is given to the planning of courses of 
study and equipment for specific schools, and under varying 
conditions. 

HOME AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS. Considers such sub- 
jects as the organization and development of the primitive home, 
the origin and development of industries, woman in modern 
industry, woman in social service, the ethics of spending, the 



46 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

work of the Consumers League, the choice and consideration 
of sociological problems in which women should take great 
interest. 

SEWING I. The course includes hand sewing, drafting and 
garment making. 

Hand sewing, primary stitches, seams, plackets, and hems 
are developed on samplers and simple articles. 

Drafting. The tape and rule drafting system is used, all 
patterns for the first year's work are drafted. Garment mak- 
ing; a four pieced suit of underwear, a shirt waist and a plain 
cotton dress. The student is instructed in the care and use of 
the sewing machine. 

SEWING II. Dressmaking. Commercial patterns are intro- 
duced and drafted patterns continued with special attention to 
design. 

The problems are : a wool dress, a silk dress, and a dainty 
cotton dress. The following phases of dressmaking are brought 
out as the problems are developed : combination of materials, 
trimmings and suitability. Students fit each other. 

MILLINERY. Making and covering of buckram and wire 
forms; making of folds, bows, flowers and ornaments; the 
selection of materials as to quality, color, suitability and dura- 
bility and the renovation and use of old materials. 

TEXTILES. The study of textile fibers, their manufac- 
ture, a survey of textile products and the development of the 
textile industry. 

ART NEEDLE WORK. Instruction is given in the stitches 
of embroidery, crochet and tatting, and their application to 
personal garments and household furnishings. 

BASKETRY. The designing and making of raffia and reed 
baskets and mats. 



HOME ECONOMICS SHORT COURSE 

This course affords an opportunity for girls who can attend 
only during the winter months, to secure a brief course in 
some of the most practical subjects of Domestic Economy. 

A girl upon completing the work outlined will be entitled 
to a certificate to that effect. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 47 

ARITHMETIC. A practical course in the elements, factor- 
ing, decimals, practical measurements, percentage. Chief em- 
phasis will be laid upon problems pertaining to home and farm. 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH. This course is intended to 
give the pupil a correct working knowledge of written and 
spoken English. For election to be made see the description of 
this course given under Farm Engineering. 

COOKERY. A study of the principles and practice cf cook- 
ery. This course includes the preparation of all classes of foods 
— fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, salads, pastry, bread, cakes, 
etc.. and the principles involved in each. Special attention is 
given to the planning and cost of meals and to table setting and 
serving. (Daily.) 

S. C. SEWING I. Garment making and the use of com- 
mercial patterns. 

Progress depends upon the individual, and the kind of work 
varies according to the ability of the pupil after the first three 
garments are completed. 

S. C. ART NEEDLEWORK. This course includes the mak- 
ing of the principal art needlework stitches and their applica- 
tion. 

S. C. SEWING II. Garment making continued with special 
attention given to the selection of material as to color, qual- 
ity, suitability and purpose ; also fitting and finishing. 

S. C. TEXTILES. The purpose of this course is to give 
the student an intelligent basis for the selection and use of tex- 
tile materials for clothing and household furnishings, also a 
study of adulterants and simple means of detecting them. 

MATHEMATICS 

ARITHMETIC. A complete review of the essentials of 
arithmetic, including the fundamental processes, fac'orins, frac- 
tions, decimals, denominate numbers, longitude and time, prac- 
tical measurements and percentage, together with the best meth- 
ods of presenting these various subjects to pupils of the pub- 
lic schools. All abstract combinations are preceded, as far as 
possible, by constructive effort and the work made objective. 
In the more advanced units of study the subjects will be treat- 
ed as they occur in actual business transactions regardless of 
text book limits. 



48 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

ARITHMETIC. (SHORT COURSE.) Industrial Arith- 
metic. Chief emphasis will he laid upon problems pertaining 
to the farm. The work will involve fractions, decimals, de- 
nominate numbers, practical measurements and percentage. 
Problems dealing with such matters as the cost of buildings, 
marketing, measurements, insurance, taxes and banking will be 
taught in the most practical business-like fashion. Daily thru 
the Winter Term. 

ALGEBRA. ONE YEAR. All elementary algebra is cov- 
ered up to and including quadratic equations, especial emphasis 
being laid on the fundamental laws of algebra, their deriva- 
tion, and their relation to the solution of problems. The re- 
lation of algebra to arithmetic and to the higher branches of 
mathematics is constantly kept in mind and the practical uses 
of algebra noted. 

PLANE GEOMETRY. ONE YEAR. Geometry, inductive 
and deductive. The student is grounded in the fundamental 
principles of the subject. Methods of reasoning; the classi- 
fication of the various geometrical forms, lines, angles and sur- 
faces, and the various k'nds of proofs. The relation of Geom- 
etry to Arithmetic. Especial emphasis on original and inventive 
work. The method of original demonstration thru analysis, 
construction and proof. Many problems in geometry as applied 
in engineering and surveying are presented. 

SOLID GEOMETRY. ONE-HALF YEAR. In order that 
the subject may be more easily comprehended, geometrical sol- 
ids are employed in the demonstration of each proposition, and 
the students are also required, from time to time, to fashion 
out of cardboard various solids for use in demonstrating prob- 
lems in construction. The application of geometry to science 
and industry receives much attention. 

ALGEBRA II. ONE-HALF YEAR. The graph, quadratic 
equations reviewed and completed. The theory of proportion. 
Problems and formulae of physics. Progressions, Logarithms. 

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. ONE 
YEAR. The theoretical part of the subject is practically com- 
pleted at mid-year. Consideration of the surveying instruments, 
including chain and tape, compass, level, transit and planimeter. 
After spring opens practically all of the time is devoted to 
field work. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 49 



PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters in the basement 
of Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table 
room and apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 20x25 
feet conveniently arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Car- 
negie Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and ap- 
paratus for twenty-four students working at one time. 

PHYSICS A. Seven hours a week for the year. This 
course consists of lectures, experiments and recitations. The 
experiments are simple, yet full and exhaustive. Especial at- 
tention is given to the solution of problems involving physical 
laws and formulae. A series of forty-eight experiments is pre- 
scribed and performed by students during the year and care- 
ful tabulations are made of the results. Especial attention is 
given to the fundamentals that lead up to the various courses in 
engineering. 

PHYSICS B. Seven hours a week for the year. Lectures 
will be given to cover the more advanced work in mechanics, 
the practical appliances on heat, light, and electricity and the 
more complex formulae for solving physical problems. Labor- 
atory work will be given, which has especial bearing on the 
topics studied and which will be of particular benefit to the 
student specializing in the Mechanic Arts. Prerequisite, 
Physics A. 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY. Seven hours a week for the 
year. Three periods a week are devoted to the study of the 
laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles of chem- 
istry and to the solution of problems in chemical arithmetic. 
Two double periods each week are devoted to laboratory work. 
Over one hundred experiments involving chemical change, af- 
finity, valence, etc., are performed and noted so that the stu- 
dent both becomes familiar with the manipulation of apparatus 
and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

CHEMISTRY OF FOODS. Daily thruout the Fall term. 
Designed especially for young women who are pursuing domes- 
tic science courses. The essential materials in a complete food ; 
the reactions that occur in their preparation and use ; the com- 
mon adulterants ; the foods in which commonly found ; how 
recognized; household tests, etc. Prerequisite. Physiology and 
Physics A. 



50 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Daily for the first four and 
one-half months. Lecture once a week. Laboratory work four 
times a week. The course consists of a systematic study of 
the bases, and elements and radicals, and a method of analyzing 
an unknown substance of complex composition. Emphasis is 
placed on such methods as can be used in quantitative deter- 
minations. Prerequisites, General Chemistry' and Elementary 
Qualitative Analysis. 

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five time a week for the 
last half of the year. Two and one-half months given to gravi- 
metric analysis and two months given to valumetric analysis. 
Some simple substances that illustrate the fundamentals of 
quantitative work, are taken up first. Then such as pig iron, 
steel, cement, soil, water for portable purposes, water for boiler 
purposes are analyzed. Prerequisites, General Chemistry, Quan- 
titative Analysis and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

BACTERIOLOGY. Five hours a week for the Spring term. 
Arranged to meet the needs of domestic science students. 
Recitations and experiments. The yeast plant is studied in all 
the important details of its life habits. Especial attention is 
given to the molds and bacteria of the household. The life 
habits of the bacilli, their relations to health and disease, the 
precautions that should be taken in preventing infection are 
dealt with extensively. 

GENERAL SCIENCE. An introductory course in the ele- 
mentary principles of both chemistry and physics, with some 
reference to related sciences. Many of the simpler phenomena 
of nature will be considered in recitation and in laboratory 
work. 

AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGY 

AGRICULTURE I. This work is divided into three parts : 
Laboratory study, class work using the text, and reporting and 
discussing farm topics of the present day. Themes on special 
topics are required of each student. Laboratory study is made 
of weeds, farm crops, soils, soil management, crop rotation, 
dairying and other live stock studies. Part of the spring is 
spent in gardening. Students completing this course should 
be able to teach the agriculture given in the rural schools. 

AGRICULTURE II. Advanced course open only to students 
who have completed Course I, or who may be otherwise spec- 
ially fitted for more advanced work. The aim is to give fur- 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 51 

ther preparation for teaching agriculture, as well as to fit 
them better for farm practice. This course allows consider- 
able special study along the lines treated, and for this reason 
is of especial value. Students may elect to do considerable 
independent work which is of much greater value than any 
other. 

AGRICULTURE, SUMMER SCHOOL. Given only in the 
summer term. This course aims to cover the field of agricul- 
ture in a general way that will help the rural teacher in pre- 
senting it to farmer boys and girls. It consists of text book 
study supplemented with outside reading, lectures and labora- 
tory work. The exercises and experiments done in the labora- 
tory are only those that can be done in any rural school room. 
The course- is divided about as the regular school year, so the 
teacher may work up an outline for the whole year's work from 
that done in summer. 

AGRICULTURE, SHORT COURSE. Given during the 
winter term to accommodate young men from the farms who 
can be in school but a few months during the winter. Specal 
phases of agriculture are studied in laboratory and class reci- 
tation. Two days a week are spent in laboratory work, two 
in text recitation, and one in discussing current farm topics in 
farm papers. 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
school, have been reserved for a demonstration farm. One 
section has been fenced for cultivation. This area has been 
devoted to school gardens, corn and alfalfa. Last year more 
land was broken, and this will be planted to alfalfa. The gar- 
dens have been relocated nearer the buildings, so the land for- 
merly used for this purpose can be used for the general farm 
crops. Some very valuable results have been obtained from 
the farm. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. Offered in the fall term 
of the second year, and required in most all courses. Most of 
the time is spent in the study and discussion of the text. Some 
time is spent in microscopic study of parts of the body, and 
in conducting practical experiments which aim to bring out 
obscure points. Especial emphasis is placed on hygiene. 

BOTANY. Offered during the winter and spring terms. It 
is required of all students in the normal and home economic 
courses. Most of the time is spent with the higher plants that 
are of most economic importance. A short time may be spent 



52 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

in studying the lower non-vascular forms from the evolution- 
ary standpoint. Especial emphasis is placed on the relation 
of botany to everyday life, which will teach the student to 
appreciate the importance of plants. During the last of the 
spring most of the flowers then in bloom are classified, and 
a small herbarium may be made. 

ENGLISH 

The work in English covers four years, three years' work 
being required for graduation. Special attention .is given in 
all classes to the student's spoken and written language. 

GRAMMAR. A thoro study of theoretical and applied gram- 
mar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the 
use of correct forms of speech, with special attention to com- 
mon errors. Elementary composition. 

For the English of the Farm Engineering and Short Course 
in Home Economics see the description under these courses. 

ENGLISH I. First half-year: The Study of Literature. 

(a) The class will study: Macauley, Horatius at the Bridge, 
Burroughs' Sharp Eyes ; Hawthorne's Great Stone Face, Am- 
bitious Guest, Great Carbuncle ; Dickens' Christmas Carol ; Ir- 
ving's Sketch Book (Selections) ; Hale's Man Without a Coun- 
try; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Lincoln's Gettysburg Ad- 
dress; Hubbard's Message to Garcia; Longfellow's Courtship 
of Miles Standish ; Whittier's Snow Bound. 

(b) For reading: Four books, one from Scott or Tenny- 
son, and three from a large number of optional books desig- 
nated by the teacher. 

Second half-year. The study of grammar and practical 
rhetoric. The points in grammar that need emphasizing will 
receive attention with a drill on these points as needed. Let- 
ter writing is taught with attention to practical creative work. 
Oral composition and more formal written work on themes 
in description and narrative will be a part of the course. 

ENGLISH II. First half-year. Practical Rhetoric and Com- 
position. 

This is a continuation of the second part of the first year, 
bringing in simple exposition. The planning of a composition 
and its paragraphing will be considered with several short 
themes to be criticized and deficiencies or weaknesses remedied. 

Second half-year: The Study of Literature. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 53 

(a) The Drama, with two of Shakespeare's great master- 
pieces studied quite critically. These will be : Julius Caesar, 
King Lear, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Midsummr Night's 
Dream, as selected by the teacher and class. Either As You 
Like It, or Henry V, or The Tempest will be read, also two 
from Sheridan's Rivals, Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, or 
Kennedy's Servant in the House will be read. Good oral read- 
ing will receive attention and some of the great passages com- 
mitted to memory. 

(b) The Novel — a crit cal study of Eliot's Silas Marner, 
and the outside reading and class criticism of another of the 
great standard novels. 

(c) The Short Story — a critical study of several short 
stories from the great treasury of modern writers ; a review 
of some of the standard short stories with a more careful 
study of some characteristic short stories. Also outside read- 
ing of nine stories from English and American authors. 

ENGLISH III. First half-year: Study of Literature (Con- 
tinued.) 

(a) Poetry, Narrative, Ep:c and Lyric. Four from the 
following: Sohrab and Rustum, Rime of the Anc'ent Mariner, 
Minor Poems or Paradise Lost I-III, Rape of the Lock, Lay 
of the Last Minstrel, Idylls of the King. 

The study and reading of several ballads and lyrics with 
memorizing of the briefer gems of the author studied. 

(b) The Oration. A study of selections from the orations 
of Lincoln, Washington, Webster and Burke, with two others 
read. 

Second Half-year: Study of Rhetoric and Composition. 

Classroom debating and the writing of several themes will 
form a part of this course. Argumentative themes and the 
best and most forcible manner of expression will be consid- 
ered. 

ENGLISH IV. First half-year: Rhetoric and Composition. 

The whole subject of rhetoric and composition reviewed and 
weaknesses corrected. Many papers of all types will be pre- 
pared to test the pupil's ability to use correct and expressive 
English. 

Second half-year. A brief survey of the history of English 
and American literature from a good brief text is the found- 
ation of this work. Historical, biographical and critical es- 
says will be written and d scussed. 

(a) For class study: Carlyle, Burns, Macauley, Johnson. 

(b) For outside reading: Two or more selections from 



54 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

the longer and more formal writings of the English and Ameri- 
can authors. 

Or, for 1916-17, as may be elected by the teacher and class 
the course as previously offered as an alternative. 

ENGLISH IV. (a) History of American Literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library sup- 
plemented by text books. Readings from American Literature, 
Calhoun & McAlarney. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a 
Water-Fowl, A Forest Hymn, The Flood of Years, The Green 
Mountain Boys, The Yellow Violet, To a Fringed Gentian ; 
Emerson's Compensation, Self-Reliance ; Lincoln's First and 
Second Inaugural Address, Gettysburg Speech, The Emanci- 
pation Proclamation ; Poe's Poems ; Taylor's Lars ; Webster's 
First Bunker Hill Oration ; Whittier's Slavery Poems and 
Snowbound. 

For reading : Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac ; Haw- 
thorne's House of Seven Gables ; Parkman's La Salle ; Thor- 
eau's The Succession of Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds ; 
Warner's My Summer in a Garden, and others as selected. 

LATIN 

LATIN I. The elements. Daily thruout the year. Careful 
study and practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections 
and syntax, a gaining of a working vocabulary. Translating 
of simple prose. Much time and emphasis is placed upon the 
translation of English into Latin. Word formation also re- 
ceives considerable attention. 

LATIN II. Caesar. Four books; translation into clear 
idiomatic English ; the life of Caesar ; facts regarding the Ro- 
man government and the organization of the Roman army 
necessary to a clear understanding of the text; comparative 
study of Latin constructions and their English equivalents, 
with a view to obtaining a clearer understanding of the exact 
structure of the English sentence. 

LATIN III. Cicero. Six orations; four In Catil'nam ; Pro 
Archia ; and De Imperio Pompei, or Pro Marcello ; the life of 
Cicero ; the Roman government in Cicero's time ; the historical 
allusions in the text; Latin constructions and the light they 
throw on English grammar. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 55 

LATIN IV. Vergil. Six books of the Aeneid ; syntax; 
grammatical peculiarities; occasional metrical translation; the 
life of Vergil; the history of his times; the mythology of the 
Aeneid; the versification of the Aeneid. 

GERMAN 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN. For beginners, special atten- 
tion is given to correct pronunciation, the principles of gram- 
mar, the conversion of simple prose from German into English 
and from English into German, and to conversation exercises. 

GERMAN READING. Review of the grammar; practice 
in translating from German into idiomatic English ; written 
exercises based on a text and Harris' Composition ,and Joynes- 
Meissner's Grammar ; Hans Anderson's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, 
Storm's Immensee, Gerstaecker's Germelshausen, Dillard's Aus 
dem Deutchen Dichterwald, Heyse's L'Arrabiata, Benedix's Die 
Hochzeitsreise, Schiller's Der Neffe als Onkel, etc. 

CLASSIC GERMAN. Joynes-Meissners Grammar, Suder- 
man's Jiohannes ; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm ; Goethe's Eg- 
mont ; Freytag's Die Journalisten ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, etc. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

THE FOUR YEAR COMMERCIAL ACADEMIC COURSE. 

The course is open to those who have completed the eighth 
grade and wish to become quite proficient in the commercial 
work and at the same time be admitted to college. Graduates 
from this course will be given a regular diploma. 

The main purpose of this course is not to turn out book- 
keepers and stenographers, however, they will be well quali- 
fied for the work of such a position, but to give them some 
of the very underlying principles of good business and at the 
same time furnish them with a good foundation for more ad- 
vanced commercial work, if desired. 

Students wishing to teach the commercial work may do so 
by taking some additional normal work, upon the completion 
of which, they will be given a teacher's certificate. 

THE TWO YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Owing to the fact that many students do not feel that they 
have the time or the money to take a four year course, and yet 
wish to become fairly proficient in the strictly commercial work, 
we have compiled the two year commercial course. This makes 



56 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

a very attractive course for those who have finished some of 
the other courses, but do not wish to teach or go to college. 

Students coming from the eighth grade will find it almost 
impossible to complete the course in two years, if both book- 
keeping and shorthand are taken up. It is possible to have con- 
cessions made in this course. Completion of the course by a 
student will be acknowledged by the granting of a special cer- 
tificate. 

Description of the work in the Commercial Department : 

BOOKKEEPING I. First term's work consists of the 
handling of ledger accounts, the journal and journal exercises, 
and the cash book. Second term's work consists of set one 
of the "20th Century" system. Third terms work is the "20th 
Century" Commission set. 

Bookkeeping is counted as a full elective in all courses. Those 
who are behind in their arithmetic find this work quite difficult. 

BOOKKEEPING II. Open to those who are qualified to 
handle the work. First term's work is the second set of the 
"20th Century" system. Second term's work is "William and 
Rogers" banking set. Third terms work is left largely to the 
wishes of the students and the judgment of the teacher in 
charge. 

Two periods per day of school work and outside work if 
the student cannot get the required amount of work done in 
the two periods of school work. 

STENOGRAPHY I. First ten lessons in the Gregg Man- 
ual along with penmanship exercises, make up the work for 
the first term. Completing the Manual and easy dictation exer- 
cises make up the second term's work. Dictation from the 
Gregg Speed Practice is taken up in the third term. 

STENOGRAPHY II. Continuation of the Gregg Speed 
Practice together with some easy dictation which review the 
principles of the system make up the work of the first term. 
Completion of the Gregg Speed Practice text, dictation from 
books, periodicals and speeches will constitute the work of the 
second term. 

Office practice and dictation of all kinds of subject matter 
will be the work of the third term. 

TYPEWRITING I. The first twenty-four lessons in Fritz- 

Eldridge text in typewriting constitute the first year's work. 

Open to all students and elective in all courses if the entire 

year's work is taken. Two periods per week of school work. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 57 

TYPEWRITING II. Completion of the Fritz-Eldridge text, 
dictation, transcribing of shorthand notes, stenciling, mimeo- 
graphing and office practice constitute the work of the second 
year. 

BUSINESS ENGLISH. A very brief review of the parts of 
speech, correction of grammatical errors and proper usage of 
adjectives and adverbs, letter writing and business correspond- 
ence. Must be preceded by a fair knowledge of English gram- 
mar. 

COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC. Van Tuyl's Complete 
Business Arithmetic is used. The work covers papering, car- 
peting and plastering of rooms, review of the principles of per- 
centage, profit and loss, trade discount, bank discount, true dis- 
count, cash discount and interest. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. Gano's text is used. This work takes 
up Contracts, Bailment, Negotiable Instruments, Insurance, 
Partnership, and Corporations. This subject is a very practical 
one, as it takes up and treats very nicely many of the rudiments 
of common law. Advisable for all students, who are capable, 
to take as an elective. 

COMMERCIAL RAW MATERIALS. The substances are 
traced from their sources in the animal, vegetable, or mineral 
kingdom thru the various processes of preparation to their final 
uses. The things which are of greatest commercial importance 
are treated in greatest detail, such articles as cotton, sugar, 
woods, rubber, silk, iron and coal being described at a consid- 
erable length. Toothaker's Commercial Raw Materials is used. 

ECONOMIC HISTORY. A general survey of the commer- 
cial development of the world from the earliest times to the 
present. Webster's General History of Commerce is used. 

PENMANSHIP AND SPELLING. One period a day of 
school work. Half the time being alloted to spelling and the 
other half to penmanship. The free arm movement in penman- 
ship is striven for and a reasonable degree of skill is required 
to graduate from the Commercial Courses. 

HISTORY AND CIVICS 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. This course includes a 
thoro review of the history of the United States and is intend- 
ed for students entering the One Year Elementary Course and 
the Two Year Elementary Course. 



58 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

CIVICS. This study is intended to acquaint the student with 
the machinery of our government both local and national, and 
thus prepare him to perform his part intelligently as a citizen 
of our country. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. A careful study of the Ancient 
Oriental Civilization in Western Asia and in Egypt. The his- 
tory of Greece and Rome is comprised in this course. Stress 
is placed on the origin and growth of the institutions of civi- 
lization and the student is led to discover what essential ele- 
ments these nations contributed to modern life. 

MODERN HISTORY. The period covered by this course 
extends from the coming of Charlemagne, 800 A. D., to the 
present time. Special attention is given to the rise of the vari- 
ous powers of Europe, to the influences that shaped them, and 
the relation they bear to the history of our country. 

AMERICAN HISTORY. In this advanced course of his- 
tory the student is led to see that the achievements in political, 
industrial, social and educational fields were gained by human 
activities rightly directed and that the responsibility of their 
maintenance in part rests on him, also to realize the importance 
of our relation with world nations. Information from sources 
other than the text book is required. Students entering this 
course must have had Ancient History or Modern History. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. A comprehensive study is here 
presented of the study of the constitutional history of the United 
States from its beginning to the present time. It includes a 
study of the growth of our national government and the gov- 
ernment of the township, county, city and state, and the -rela- 
tion between the various forms. A brief study of Ancient and 
Modern governments is taken up to enable the student to under- 
stand the beginnings and fundamentals of government and 
governmental institutions. 

DRAWING AND FINE ARTS 

The department offers thoro instruction in fine and decor- 
ative arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the third floor 
of Carnegie Hall, and there is ample equipment of casts and 
studio furnishings. The department aims to give thoro in- 
struction in the principles of drawing and painting ; to enlarge 
the student's acquaintance with what is best in art ; to offer 
courses of instruction adapted to the needs of teachers in the 
public schools and supervisors of art instruction in city schools. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 59 

With serious study a high degree of effiiency and technical 
knowledge may be attained here at much less expense than 
would be incurred for similar instruction in a large city. 

Not "art for art's sake," but art for the enrichment of life 
is the conception held here. Artistic taste and appreciation of 
the beautiful are needed in the humblest and busiest - life. 
Especial emphasis is placed upon the application of the prin- 
ciples of fine arts to the environment of the every day life. 

FINE ARTS. A general course in appreciation and com- 
bining the essentials in drawing, painting and composition. A 
study of form, using different media — Charcoal, pencil, water 
color and oil. Still life and flower painting in water color. 
Study of composition by using flowers and landscapes. Figure 
sketching, advanced composition and illustration in charcoal, 
water color and china painting. 

NORMAL PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING. The work of 
this course is planned with special reference to the teaching 
of drawing and hand work in the public schools. One period 
daily for three terms is required for the completion of the 
work. With public school music this course forms a full nor- 
mal credit. 

Term A. Primary Grades. The work consists of paper 
folding, tearing and cutting, story telling by means of colored 
paper and crayola, color study with simple color charts, the 
study and representation of simple well known forms, silhou- 
ettes of animals, simple figures and landscape work, representa- 
tion of flowers and birds with crayolas and water color, paper 
construction, weaving, raffia wrapping, braiding and knotting. 

Term B. Intermediate Grades. Study of form by use of 
charcoal, pencil and color. Special study of the cube, sphere 
and cylinder, and similar shapes ; color theory ; hue, intensity 
and textile values, chart of complementary colors, and relation 
of these colors. Simple design problems, illustrating the use 
of the elements and principles of design. Landscapes in black 
and white, and colored representations of autumn, winter and 
spring. Silhouettes of casts of animals. Scales of tone values. 
Figure sketching and illustrating. Paper construction, reed mats 
and baskets. , 

Term C. Grammar Grades. Some of the same problems are 
worked out, but the work is more technical. Principles of de- 
sign and perspective are considered. Designs are made and 
applied to sewed basketry. Still life studies are worked out 
in color and charcoal. Special study of birds during the spring 



60 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

term. Study of masterpieces from reproductions. Methods of 
teaching drawing and general outline for the grades. 

METAL WORK. The problems given are considered in 
relation to each other in order to develop a general knowl- 
edge of sheet metal work. Processes include forming, sawing, 
filing and building by hard and soft soldering, riveting, etc., 
together with a study of the processes or repousee, etching 
and coloring. 

POTTERY. The course begins with the building of hand- 
made pieces of different sizes and shapes ; the making of tiles 
together with decoration by relief and incised lines; building 
of pilaster models ; casting of moulds and pouring and fin- 
ishing of mould-made pieces. Students glaze and fire a part of 
their work. 

HANDICRAFTS. In addition to the courses in metal work 
and pottery, students are offered work in the following crafts : 
Bookbinding, cut and tooled leather work, advanced construc- 
tion with tilo matting, raffia and reeds, stenciling and block 
painting. 

CHINA PAINTING. Special work in china-painting is of- 
fered by the Fine Arts Department. This includes the study 
of appropriate design for china, the mixing and application of 
color, and the consideration of the various processes involved 
in keramic art. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial 
School comprises instruction in piano, voice," chorus work, har- 
mony, history of music, music theory and science of music. 
Special efforts are made to make clear to the students the im- 
portance of technical work and the study of touch, accentua- 
tion and tone coloring. This leads to an understanding of 
what it means to interpret music and a thoro conception of the 
art of expression and artistic execution. The main purpose of 
piano music is to enable the student to understand what music 
is ; help him understand that music, like all other art, must 
touch the soul of man, or interpret the soul of man — and be 
an expression of charactetr, personality and individuality. 

The ability to think music and hear musically and to study in- 
telligently will be insisted upon as a prime requisite of suc- 
cess. Especial care and thot will be brot to bear upon the 
problems of memorization. 




MUSIC STUDIO 




A VIEW IN THE DINING ROOM 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 61 

Assuming no knowledge of the instrument whatever, from 
two to three years' study is needed by students of average 
ability before they are ready to take up the regular Special 
Music Course. 

The following outlines are suggestive of the work done. The 
studies given will be such as most fully meet the needs of the 
pupil. 

Preparatory course in hand culture which is based on prin- 
ciples taught by Leschetizky ; Major scales. Damm's School 
for Beginners. Pieces by modern composers. 

First year : Hand Culture continued ; exercises for increas- 
ing velocity, Czerny, 101 Progressive Studies. Modern Sona- 
tinas. Selected pieces from Reinecke, Schuman's Album for 
the Young, Schmoll, Duvernoy, Streabbog, Tschaikowsky. 

Second, Junior and Senior Years correspond to the First, 
Second and Third Years in Piano as given in the Special Mu- 
sic Course. 

SPECIAL MUSIC COURSE 
Each study listed is to be pursued through the entire school 
year unless otherwise indicated. 

Piano. 

First Year Second Year Third Year 

Piano Piano Piano 

Theory Theory Ensemble Playing 

Musical Voice (Normal Music) 

Appreciation 

Musical History German Psychology 

English I. English II. English III. 

First Year : Scales, arpeggios, chords and octaves. Sona- 
tinas of Clementi, Kuhlau, Mozart, and Schytte, Haydn. Ac- 
curate memorization and playing of such as "Little Preludes, 
Fugus," Bach. Selected works of Beethoven, Schuman, Grieg 
and others. 

Second Year : Development of technic by addition of thirds, 
sixths and complicated rhythms. 

Studies of Czerny, Hanson and Kuhlau. 

Sonatas of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert. 

Free selections by Mendelssohn, Schubert, Schuman, Grieg, 
Chopin, and modern composers. 

Third Year : Applied Technic. Preludes and Fugus from 
"Well Tempered Clavichord," Bach, also some of same com- 
posers Suite. Sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven. Selections, 



62 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Schuett, D'Albert MacDowell, Rach- 
maninoff and Reger. 

Harmony is to theory what grammar is to a language. Scales, 
intervals, formation of triads and septchards, moersions and 
cadences. Sequences in the key. Staff work based mostly on 
figured bass. Chord progressions and modulation. Advanced 
work, based upon Chadwick and Foote and Spaldings' "Modern 
Harmony." 

History of Music. A general survey. Early canons and 
folk-songs. Drill in pronunciation of names. Development 
of orchestra and instrumental forms. Piano music of Weber, 
Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schuman, Liszt and Wagner. 
. Ear Training. Melodies and rhythmic dictation within the 
key. Triads in all forms. Identifications of same in key-re- 
lation to the major and minor modes. Chromatic tones. 

Instrumental Ensemble. Four-hand piano arrangements of 
overtures and symphonies for purposes of sight-reading and 
rhythmic feeling, also accompanying voice. 

Normal and Public School Music. All pupils in this depart- 
ment are required to do a certain amount of Practice Teach- 
ing, either in class or with individual pupils. 

SPECIAL VOCAL COURSE 
Each study listed is to be pursued thru the entire school year 
unless otherwise indicated. 

Voice 

First Year Second Year Third Year 

Voice Voice Voice 

Piano Piano Normal P. S. Music 

(Music History (Sight Singing Psychology 

(Ear Training (Mus. Appreciation German 

Theory German English III. 

English I. English II. 

Voice 
It is aimed to secure in the Vocal Department of the school 
courses of study which will fulfill the demands of every class 
of students, amateur or professional, singer or teacher. The 
course of instruction is based primarily upon the Italian school 
for training the voice. Correct placement so that the pupil 
produces tones thruout all registers with ease and with a firm, 
even quality, is the foundation of good singing. During the 
first year particular attention is paid to a systematic course of 
breathing, tone placements, and a careful analysis of vowels 
and consonants in relation to vocal needs. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 63 

The songs of Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, McDowell, Par- 
ker, Chadwick, Foote ; operas of Mozart, Verdi, Donizetti ; and 
oratorios of Hadyn, Handel and Mendelssohn are studied. 

Students are given opportunities to appear publicly, thus 
fitting them for concert and church work. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

Notation Bar-training Sight Singing 

Musical History Rote Songs 

Chorus and Conducting Methods 

Notation. Practice in accurate and rapid blackboard work 
in the writing of musical signs and knowledge of their use. 

Ear Training. Preliminary exercises to quicken the musical 
hearing. The vocal and written production of melodies in 
major and minor modes. The recognition through the ear of 
the chords of the fundamental harmonies. 

Sight Singing. Class and individual drill in singing at sight, 
without accompaniment, melodies of simple harmonic contents 
in all keys, major and minor. 

Rote Songs. The study and interpretation of song material 
suited to various grades of school. How to select, to teach, 
and to use them. 

Methods. In this class, fundamental teaching principles are 
presented and the problems in music, under the head of rhythm, 
melody, and harmony are classified according to grades from 
primary through the high school. These problems are pre- 
sented and taught in class by the teacher in charge, the les- 
son discussed and outlined, then given back to the class by its 
individual members. 

Conducting and Chorus. The study of the art of conduct- 
ing, leading to an intelligent use of the baton, chorus practice 
which each member of the class is taught to direct. 

History of Music. This subject is given throughout the year, 
dealing with the development of music in all its forms from 
primitive times to the present, with the history of musical 
taste and culture in all countries. 

Choral Singing. Daily chorus practice for a brief period is 
given the entire school. This class is made up of the entire 
body of students and attendance is compulsory. Constant prac- 
tice is had on such compositions as lie within the range and 
understanding of the pupils. Two glee clubs are organized and 
given systematic drill. 



64 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

By an act of the Legislature the State Normal and Industrial 
School is required to give theoretical and practical instruction 
in Military Science, and the company organized and drilled is 
subject to regular inspection by the Adjutant General of the 
State. In harmony with this provision young men are drilled 
regularly in the schools of the soldier, squad, platoon, com- 
pany, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(1) ORGANIZATION. The cadet battalion at present 
comprises, with the commandant, one cadet captain, one cadet 
first lieutenant, one cadet second lieutenant, five sergeants, one 
color sergeant, six corporals, and one artificer and cadets. A 
permanent company is maintained under the name of Com- 
pany A. A company is organized during the second term, 
composed principally of short course students. This is known 
as Company B. 

(2) EQUIPMENT. The State Normal and Industrial 
School is supplied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutre- 
ments ; a Winchester rifle for long range practice, Winder 
target rifles ; a large Atkins disappearing target ; United States 
regulation rapiers, for fencing ; sabers and belts for cadet of- 
ficers ; silk battalion flag, United States regulation ammuni- 
tion, consisting of cartridges for target practice, and blank 
cartridges for use in volley firing and skirmish drill. Appli- 
cation has been made to the Adjutant General, U. S. A., for 
the detail of a regular army officer and the issuance of modern 
arms and equipment. 

(3) APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS. The offic- 
ers and non-commissioned officers are selected from among 
those cadets which have been most studious, soldier-like and 
faithful in the performance of their duties, and who have been 
most exemplary in their deportment. The commandant and 
the commissioned officers constitute the board of examiners for 
the appointment and promotion of privates and non-commis- 
sioned officers. 

(4) MILITARY DIPLOMA. Commissions and warrants 
are issued to the commissioned officers who are duly examined 
and deemed worthy of promotion, provided, however, that 
they have drilled at least one term as officers, have been pro- 
moted to higher rank, have received an average of not less 
than 75 per cent, and have participated in at least one annual 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 65 

military contest. A form of discharge will also be issued to 
non-commissioned officers and cadets who have satisfactorily 
completed the prescribed drill. 

(5) UNIFORM. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn 
by all cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in 
courses requiring attendance for more than a single term. This 
uniform consists of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray 
color, modeled after the United States Military Academy uni- 
form. The price varies from $11.00 to $15.00. The uniform 
is tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, durable and 
economical a suit as the student can obtain for this amount. 
It may be purchased at the school, at actual cost, or else- 
where, as the student elects. Uniforms and gloves are worn 
at all regular drills and inspections. 

(6) ATTENDANCE. Six terms of military drill are re- 
quired of all boys, unless excused on account of physical dis- 
ability. A physician's certificate must accompany such excuse. 
The standing of each cadet is averaged at the close of each 
term. The chief items considered in determining the grade are 
attendance, deportment and drill. Only those cadets whose 
average is above 75 per cent for the six terms will be exempt 
from attendance. 

(7) ANNUAL MILITARY CONTEST AND PRIZES. 
An annual military contest is held at the close of the Winter 
Term. There are three events : Company Drill and Inspec- 
tion ; Squad Drill ; Individual Contest Drill. For each drill 
at the annual military contest there are three judges selected 
by the President and Commandant. The squad receiving the 
highest percentage in contest drill is presented with a silk rib- 
bon, suitably inscribed, which is attached to the battalion col- 
ors, and the members of the squad receive honorable mention 
in the catalog. The squad receiving second mark is given hon- 
orable mention in the catalog also. The prize for the best 
drilled man in the individual contest is a silver medal and for 
second a bronze medal. 

The members of the prize squad are also given honorable 
mention in the catalog. 

The individual contest is open to all cadets and non-com- 
missioned officers of the battalion. All cadets who take part 
in the annual military contest must appear in full regulation 
uniform. 

In the 1916 contest there were two medals awarded in the 
Individual Contest, as follows : 



66 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

First Prize, Co. A., a silver medal— Cadet Frank Callan. 
Second Prize, Co. A., a bronze medal— Cadet Fred Smith- 
Peterson. 

In the squad contest the winners were as follows : 

First Place— Squad III of Co. A. 

Second Place — Squad II of Co. A. 

Squad III was composed of the following: Sergeant Charles 
Blumer (Commanding), and Cadets Jay Ashley, Harley Feree, 
Jacob Porter, Walter Quam, Arthur Thompson, Creede Weir, 
Frank Wiltsey, Victor Young. 

Squad II was composed of : Second Lieutenant Paul Reh- 
berg (Commanding), Corporal Andrew Hulstrand, and Cadets 
Frank Davis, Roy Homedew, Maro Jahr, Elmer Johnson, Leon- 
ard Pylman, Cecil Snow, Claire Willis. 

The Prize Squad was composed of : Captain Arthur Strutz 
(Commanding), Sergeant Ceryl Black, Sergeant Ira Morgans, 
Corporal Oscar Anderson, Corporal Ralph Oertli, and Cadets 
Frank Callan, Fred Smith-Peterson, Harvey Hill and Herbert 
Pease. 

The officers of Co. A for the year 1915-1916 were: 

Commandant J. E. Swetland 

Captain Arthur Strutz 

First Lieutenant Stanley J. Fleming 

Second Lieutenant Paul H. Rehberg 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The primary purpose of the State Normal and Industrial 
School is the harmonious development of the entire boy or girl. 
Athletics and sports have a place in the development of every 
normal person and receive proper encouragement and super- 
vision. Physical training is compulsory; two periods per week 
for six terms. A physical examination is given each student 
taking gymnasium work and his greatest needs are determined 
by the use of cards and charts. These cards are kept on file, 
for reference, so that his improvement may be noted and weak- 
nesses corrected. Each student must procure a gymnasium 
suit of prescribed pattern and gymnasium shoes. 

Physical Training. 

(a) FOR YOUNG MEN. Two periods per week of six 
terms ; 6 points credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnas- 
tics, both with and without apparatus ; free-hand exercises ; 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



sports. Football, basketball, baseball and tennis are available 
in season. 

Gymnasium classes will be held in the afternoon at the 7th 
and 8th periods. All those desiring or who are required to 
take the work are requested to arrange to take it at one of 
these periods. 

(b) FOR YOUNG WOMEN. Two periods per week for 
six terms ; G points credit. 

Under the instruction of a woman teacher. The exercises 
are similar to those for boys, consisting of dumb-bells and 
barbell training, club swinging, marching, running, exercises 
with light apparatus, etc. Basketball is given a fair share of 
the time. 

ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL TRAINING. Especially 
designed for students expecting to teach, and coach, athletics. 
Anatomy, physiology and hygiene will be taken up so 'as to 
give the student a practical working basis for the course and 
show the necessity and benefits of physical training. The 
fundamental principles of the different branches of athletics 
tvill be considered ; selection, training and conditioning of ath- 
letes ; problems of temperament, climate, weather and travel- 
ing. Lectures, charts, demonstrations and notebook work once 
a week throughout the year. 

Each student will be required to do a certain amount of prac- 
tice teaching and original work. 



68 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



List of Students 



SENIOR CLASS 
Normal Manual Training Course 

John Dawe Fullerton 

Richard John Gamble Longville, Minn. 

Frederick Smith-Peterson Park River 

Arthur George Strutz Oakes 

Hiram V. Ward .Ellendale 

Normal Home Economics Course 

Belva M. Barnes Ellendale 

Mildred Viola Bjornstad Ellendale 

Edna Mae Harris Ellendale 

Agnes Leverty Ellendale 

Gene McGraw Cogswell 

Ada Lenora Olson Hillsboro 

Normal Course 

Mattie Lucia Ayres Frederick, S. D. 

Gladys Elizabeth Ayres Frederick, S. D. 

Frances Katherine Baker Hazelton 

Frances Leota Boom Ellendale 

Mabel F. Colwell Monango 

Angelina Marguerite Cook Ellendale 

William Ashton Gamble Longville, Minn. 

Dorothy Harvey Gamble Ellendale 

Edna Hatfield Ellendale 

Bessie Campbell Johnson , .. . Ellendale 

Cora Matilda Kabrud Forbes 

Elsie Kalbus Ellendale 

Bertha Viola Knox Monango 

Irene Lenaida Ludwig Wheaton, Minn. 

Millie McGraw Cogswell 

Lulu Noess Ellendale 

Clara Peterson Crosby 

Ella Theresa Podoll Jud 

Laura Potter Ellendale 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 69 

Dorothy Mae Smith Ellendale 

Olive May Sullivan Ellendale 

Adr!a H. Williams Steele 

Helen Wilson Monango 

Mechanic Arts Course 

James Leonard Meachen Ellendale 

Walter L. Saunders Ellendale 

Mauriel Dunton Ellendale 

Stanley J. Fleming Ellendale 

Paul H. Rehberg Ellendale 

Eber Welcher Ellendale 

Academic Course 

John W. Ackerman Wishek 

Floyd Brown Ellendale 

Carrie Callan Ellendale 

Preston Coleman Ellendale 

Ruth Geraldine Hay Revillo, S. D. 

Aida Dewey Miller Ellendale 

Herbert Charles Peek Ellendale 

Mamie Weber Forbes 

Ruth Adelaiade Weber Forbes 

Beulah lone Williams Ellendale 

Ernest Gordon Wood Forbes 

Commercial Academic Course 

Orvis Banks Ellendale 

Fred Thompson Fairdale 

Everett A. Thrams Bismarck 

JUNIORS 

Ackerman, Fred Wishek 

Ashley, Jay Brampton 

Black, Ceryl E Ellendale 

Callan, Frank Ellendale 

Coleman, Bessie Ellendale 

Coleman, Helen Ellendale 

Crandall, Fern Ellendale 

Dawe, Gladys Fullerton 

Farrell, Neil Lisbon 

Geer, Clayton Ellendale 

Graham, Gladys Ellendale 

Guldborg, Marie Ellendale 

Hall, Faye Monango 



70 NORMAL_AND_I>^ . 

Ellendale 

Hermansen, Anna Ellendale 

Hill, Hervey : '".'.' Kulm 

Hollan, Daisy " Ellendale 

Johansen, Agnes Solomon, Kansas 

Leasure, Fred G Ellendale 

Lynde, Orrin " Ellendale 

Lynde, Llewellyn _ Forbes 

McConville, Elizabeth .'.'.'.'.'.Frederick, S. D. 

Morgans, Ira " Ellendale 

Nelson, J ennie Fullerton 

Nichols, Harry Anoka, Minn. 

Norr's, Nettie **" Stirum 

Pease, LeRoy ' Oakes 

Pederson, Fritz Rhame 

Quam, Agnes J Forbes 

Sandon, Delbert Ellendale 

Stewart, Dean M * Oakes 

Swanson, Oscar A * '. Kulm 

Thoreson, Mary Ashley 

Walz, Fred • ' Ellendale 

Weiste, Martha " ' Ellendale 

Welcher, Donna " ' Ellendale 

Wentzel, Helen Ellendale 

Williams, Lewis " Edmore 

Woldy, June I "" Oakes 

Zieman, Harold 

THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Rhame 

Bird, Carol L ' Fullerton 

Johnson, Loyezelle " . . . Ellendale 

Joyner, Audrey Ellendale 

Porter, Jacob Guelph 

Wagner, Ruth A 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 

Ellendale 

Anderson, Hazel J Ellendale 

Anderson, Oscar ' ' Ellendale 

Billey, Esther G " * ' Ellendale 

Billey, Helen H Ellendale 

Blumer, Chas ' Ellendale 

Brown, George "" Ellendale 

Callan, Emily "" Alpha 

Hogoboom, Neil C 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 71 

Homedew, Lillie Ellendale 

Homedew, Roy Ellendale 

Hultstrand, Andrew Fairdale 

Joyner, Albert Ellendale 

Knox, Ethel Monango 

Lee, Arthur Cayuga 

McGinnis, Lucille Silverleaf 

McMillan, Beulah Manson, Iowa 

Millard, Murrell Ellendale 

Nelson, Esther Fullerton 

Nelson, Lottie Ellendale 

Olson, Odina B Hillsboro 

Pease, Herbert Stirum 

Peterson, Gladys Edmunds 

Quam, Walter Rhame 

Smith. Chas Ellendale 

Thompson, Arthur Fairdale 

Wattles, Grace Ellendale 

Wheeler, Wilbur Wessington Springs, S. D. 

Wickersham, Lee Ellendale 

Zieman, Gladys Oakes 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Bentley, C. Ronald Ellendale 

Benz, Flora Mof lit 

Bjur, Emil Ellendale 

Bowers, E. Margaret Ellendale 

Brown, Yerda Ellendale 

Buckmiller, Evelyn Brampton 

Burkhardt, Agnes Guelph 

Cook, Amy Marie Ellendale 

Davis, Frank Ellendale 

Dyrhood, Nikoli Kulm 

Evans, Blanche Ellendale 

Ferree, Harley Ellendale 

Gordon, Edna May Ellendale 

Gorman, Ethel Silverleaf 

Hill, Ethel Ellendale 

Hogana, Esther Guelph 

Jahr, Maro Bengough, Sask., Canada 

Kelsh, Mary Fullerton 

Kieffer, Genevieve Dale 

Kieffer, Helen Dale 

Martinson, Nina Savo, S. D. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



McCormick, Bernice Newark, S. D. 

McMartin, Leonard Ellendale 

Moore, Walter Forbes 

Mueller, Ray Ellendale 

Nelson, Julia Fullerton 

Nordstrom, Ivar Kulm 

Pylman, Leonard Ellendale 

Roberts, Ella Brampton 

Snow, Cecil Oakes 

Strand, Lydia Sharon 

Waite, Mary Guelph 

Ward, T. Earl Baldwin 

Weir, Creede Rhame 

Weiste, Nina *. Ludden 

Weitala, Rubert Guelph 

Williams, Milton Newark 

Williams, Lauretta Newark 

Willis, Clair Rhame 

Willis, Coyle Ellendale 

Yeager, Peter Forbes 

Young, Victor Gackle 

ELEMENTARY NORMAL COURSE 

Barry, Elizabeth . Battle Lake, Minn. 

Bowerman, Mae Forbes 

Buck, Charles Linton 

Clarke, Ethel M Braddock 

Combellick, Wilma A Gettysburg 

Cooper, Gladys Brampton 

Fulton, Maria Forbes 

Gould, Mabel Oakdale 

Hanson, Louisa Brampton 

Jacobson, Nina Bessie 

Johnson, Marian Hazelton 

King, Cappie Ursina, Pa. 

Larson, Alpha Frederick, S. D. 

Mankinen, Hilma Frederick, S. D. 

Nordstrom, Elly Kulm 

Rost, Edna Kulm 

Schon, Katherine Ellendale 

Siemers, Ella Frederick, S. D. 

Stolle, May Hecla, S. D. 

Swangstu, Sarah , Lidgerwood 

Titus, Edith Clement 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 73 

Tjostem, Louise Lidgerwood 

Way, Winnifred Ellendale 

Weir, Margaret Rhame 

Weir, Ruth Rhame 

Zinter, Julius Ellendale 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Abraham, Francis Ellendale 

Barnes, Bertha M Ellendale 

Bell, W. R Ellendale 

Benz, Emanuel Fredonia 

Bishop, Thelma Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clara Ellendale 

Black, Marguerite Ellendale 

Bowler, Dorothy Ellendale 

Brown, Herbert Ellendale 

Carpenter, J. Joseph Cogswell 

Coleman, Edith Ellendale 

Coleman, Helen L Ellendale 

Colwell, Clifford Berlin 

Combellick, Flora Ellendale 

Cooper, Mrs. G. W Ellendale 

Crabtree, Muriel Ellendale 

Crandall, Ethel Ellendale 

Crandall, Fay Ellendale 

Crary, Charles Ellendale 

Evans, Martha Ellendale 

Faulkner, Georgia Pingree 

George, Christen Lehr 

Haas, Ruth M Ellendale 

Hay, Arthur E Revillo, S. D. 

Hill, Myrtle Ellendale 

Hoflein, Ruth ' Rutland 

Hopkins, Winnifred Barnard, S. D. 

Hougland, Rev. H. E Ellendale 

House, Mildred , Ellendale 

Hathaway, Mrs. F. C Ellendale 

Hutsinpiller, Ina Oakes 

Jahn, Anna M Oakes 

Johnson, Augusta Ellendale 

Johnson, Esther Pingree 

Jones, Hobart Ellendale 

King, Claude Ellendale 

Knutsen, Minnie Scranton 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Kohnke, Luella Merricourt 

Koch, Marie Ellendale 

Lamblez, Edna Lisbon 

Lee, Thomas Cayuga 

Leischner, Theodore Lehr 

Leischner, Gottfried Lehr 

Linville, W. B Guelph 

Lynde, Grace Ellendale 

McGinnis, Hazel . . . . .^ Ellendale 

McMartin, Vera ....*. Ellendale 

Millard, Ruth Ellendale 

Miller, Beth Ellendale 

Misfeldt, Elizabeth C Ellendale 

Oertli, Edna Ellendale 

Oertli, Ralph Ellendale 

Orth, William Fredonia 

Peschl, Hazel Ellendale 

Pesio, Edna Frederick 

Petit, Eva Mandan 

Pf romer, Clara Wirch 

Porter, Hector Ellendale 

Rasmussen, Myrtle Ellendale 

Rehberg, Gertrude Ellendale 

Reich, Fred Hellwig 

Robidean, Leole Princeton, Minn. 

Rosenthal, Lawrence , Ellendale 

Rosenthal, Ruth Ellendale 

St. John, Jay Ellendale 

Schmierer, Eva Ellendale 

Schook, Anna Ellendale 

Scheweinfus, Elizabeth Castalia, Iowa 

Sch weitz, Ernest Wirch 

Sorteberg, Howard Ellendale 

Staf sburg, Alma Jud 

Strand, Selmer Ellendale 

Swanson, Anton Ellendale 

Swetland, Hazel E Ellendale 

Townsend, Sarah : Ellendale 

Tschappet, Bertha Hecla, S. D. 

Tveit, Martin Frederick, S. D. 

Tveit, John Frederick, S. D. 

Uream, Steve Ellendale 

Wiltsey, Frank Frederick, S. D. 

Wallace, J. J Silverleaf 

Wolf, Jacob Fredonia 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 75 

SHORT COURSE STUDENTS 

Barsten, Mamie Fullerton 

Billey, Leino Ellendale 

Bliss, Rex C Ellendale 

Cook, Jerrold Monango 

Dawson, Stanley Ellendale 

Falkenstein, Ralph R Baldwin 

Gilligan, Burton Medberry 

Haag, Jacob Fredonia 

Hardin, Dee Monango 

Heine, Wm Ellendale 

Heine, Robert, Ellendale 

Hermansen, Herman Ellendale 

Hoermann, Maria Ellendale 

Holms, Eddie Fullerton 

Johnson, Elmer Wilton 

Johnson, William Ellendale 

Kelsh, George Fullerton 

McConville, James Forbes 

McCrory, John Forbes 

Meggers, Benjamin Rhame 

Meggers, Harold Rhame 

Myers, Earl Bloomingdale, Mich. 

Nathan, Harold Ellendale 

Petri, William Hebron 

Reamann, Beatrice Braddock 

Reamann, McKinley Braddock 

Ritzloff, Louise Ellendale 

Romstad, Olaf Oakes 

Schaller, Fred Ellendale 

Schon, John Ellendale 

Stowell, George White Creek, Wis. 

Strand, Martha Sharon 

Wagner, Benjamin Ashley 

Waite, Wilf ord Ellendale 

Wedel, Fred Fullertor 

Wedel, Walter Ellendale 

Wirch, Richard Wirch 

Welander, Palmer Fullerton 

Wittmeyer, Martin Streeter 



76 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

SUMMARY 

Senior Class 54 

Junior Class 39 

Third Year Class 5 

Second Year Class 29 

First Year Class 42 

Elementary Normal Courses 26 

Special Students 82 

Short Course Students 39 

Total 316 

Students in the Summer School of 1915 212 

528 

Number of students counted twice 33 

Total 495 



n 



ONIVERSITr OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY 



NORTH DAKOTA 

- ■ i ,!,„ i- — ■mil ■ i --» iwmto-n-rm n-mVrutmmvH^ 

State Normal and 
Industrial School 

Ellendale, North Dakota 




UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Jflrs mistrntm- Library 



Catalog Number / 1 [i.J ' 



une, 1917 



BISMARCK TRIBUNE PRINT 



CATALOG NUMBER 



North Dakota State Normal 

and 

Industrial School 




JUNE, 1917 
Vol, 12 No. 3 



Published Quarterly by the 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Ellendale, North Dakota 



Entered August 8, 1907, at Ellendale, No. Dak., under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



CALENDAR 

1917 

Fall Term, Thirteen Weeks 

Registration Tuesday, Sept. 25 and Wednesday, Sept. 26 

Class Work Begins .Thursday, September 27 

Y. Ml C. A., Y. W. C. A. and Faculty Reception 

Saturday evening, Sept. 29 

Thanksgiving Holiday .Thursday, November 2£ 

Fall Term Ends Friday Evening, December 21 

1918 
Winter Term, Twelve Weeks 

Registration Wednesday, January 2 and Thursday, Jan. 3 

Class Work Begins Friday, January 4 

Reception to Short Course Students. .Saturday Evening, Jan. 5 

Annual Military Contest Friday, March 22 

Cadet Reception and Banquet Monday, March 2£ 

Winter Term Ends Thursday Evening, March 28 

Spring Term, Eleven Weeks 

Registration of Students Tuesday, April 2 

Class Work Begins Wednesday, April 3 

Annual Oratorical Contest Tuesday Evening, May 14 

Field Day and May Fete Saturday, May 18 

Junior-Senior Reception Saturday, June 8 

Baccalaureate Address Sunday, June 9 

Annual Declamatory Contest Mionday, June 10 

Annual School Concert Tuesday, June 11 

Senior Class Play Wednesday, June 12 

Commencement, 10 :30 a. m 'Thursday, June 13 

President's Reception Thursday, June 13 

Alumni Reunion . . . , Friday, June 14 

Summer Term, Six Weeks 

Registration Monday, June 17 

Work Begins Tuesday. June lb' 

Summer Term Ends Friday Evening, July 26 

Note — The opening date for the fall term has been fixed at 
Sept. 25 ; should war or crop conditions necessitate a later 
opening date full publicity will be given thru the public press. 



STATE BOARD OF REGENTS 

Hon. L. F. Crawford, President Sentinel Butte 

Hon. Frank White, Vice President Valley City 

Hon. J. D. Taylor Grand Forks 

Hon. Emil Scow Bowman 

Hon. J. A. Power Leonard 

Hon. Charles Brewer, Secretary Bismarck 

Edwin B. Craighead, Commissioner of Education. 

Miss Fanny C. Crawford, Local Secretary for the State 
Normal and Industrial School Ellendale 



FACULTY 1916-1917 

M. BLACK, A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895; A. M., 
1910; Graduate student, University of Chicago; Professor 
in Red River Valley University, 1895-97, 1899-1903; Super- 
intendent of Wahpeton City Scools, 1903-5; County Su- 
perintendent of Richland County, 1905-9; Professor of His- 
tory and Political Science, State School of Science, 1909- 
14; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

President 



W. ACKERT, Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 
1899; B. Pd., Steinman College, 1901; A. B., Drake Uni- 
versity, 1907; Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1907. 

Mathematics 



W. G. BOWERS. West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1905; A. M., Indiana State 
University, 1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1903-5; Principal of Schools, Lees- 
burg, O., 1905-6; Instructor in Science, Indiana Normal 
1906-7; Graduate student University of California, 1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1907. 

Physical Science 



CARRIE TUTTLE, A. B., Wittenberg College; Student in 
Library Economy, Chicago University. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1907. 

Librarian 



GABRIELLA C. BRENDEMUHL, A. B., Carleton College, 
1905; Phi Beta Kappa; Teacher of German and Precep- 
tress, Rochester Academy, 1905-08; High School Assistant 
Principal, 1908-10; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1910. 

German, English 



BEATRICE OLSON, B. A., University of North Dakota; Phi 
Beta Kappa; Emerson College of Oratory, Boston; Prin- 
cipal of High School, Rugby, N. D. ; Instructor English 
and Public Speaking, Fargo, N. D. ; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1913. 

Head of English Department 
Public Speaking 



OLIN E. COMBELLICK. Graduate of Normal Department, 
Dakota University; B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University; 
Superintendent of Schools, 1907-1913; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1915; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1913. 

Director of Normal Department 

FLOYD C. HATHAWAY. B. S./ South Dakota State Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts ; student Parker 
College; student Minnesota School of Agriculture; gradu- 
ate student University of Wisconsin; State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1913. 

Agriculture 



L. B. FIELDS. M. E., Purdue University, 1907; Assistant in 
Practical Mechanics, Purdue University, 1905-07; Instruct- 
or in Mechanical Drawing and Pattern Making, Indiana In- 
dustrial School, 1907-10; Normal-Industrial School, 1910- 
12; Bellingham, Washington, City Schools, 1912-1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Director of Mechanic Arts 
Steam Engines 

TILDA R. NATWICK. Valley City Normal School; Stevens 
Point, Wisconsin Normal School; Student, Stout Institute; 
Principal of Schools, Embarrass, Wis., four years; Teach- 
er Domestic Science, Minto, N. D., 1911-1913; Domestic 
Science, Jamestown, N. D., City Schools, 1913-1915; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Home Economics 



GERTRUDE GIBBENS. B. S., North Dakota Agricultural 
College; Graduate Student, University of Colorado, 1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Home Economics 



JENNIE J. HARNSBERGER. Graduate Wisconsin State 
Normal School; Teachers' Course, Art Institute, Chicago; 
Crafts-Handicraft Guild, Minneapolis. Supervisor of 
Drawing, Albert Lea, Minnesota, 1906-12; Art Student, Chi- 
cago, 1912-13; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

Preceptress 
Drawing 
Fine Arts 

J. T. FULLER. B. A., Carleton College ,1897; Graduate Stu- 
dent University of Minnesota; Superintendent of City 
Schools in Minnesota, 1897-1912; New Rockford, N. D., 
1912-15 ; Summer Training Schools in Minnesota, three 
years; State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Psychology and Latin 



ALPHA HOLTE. State Normal-Industrial School, 1908. 
Graduate Columbia School of Music, Chicago, 1910. Super- 
visor of music in the city schools of Montrose, Colorado, 
1910-1913; Teacher of Voice in Western Slope Conserva- 
tory of Music, Montrose, 1910-12; Student of Harmony, 
under Rossitter Cole and special student in the Garst 
Vocal Studies in Voice Building and Interpretation, 1913- 
14; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

Vocal Music 



HERBERT BROWN. Dakota Wesleyan University. Univer- 
sity of South Dakota. Principal of Schools, Lennox, South 
Dakota; Principal of Schools, Harrisburg, S. D. ; Princi- 
pal of Schools, Napoleon, N. D., 1909-11. County Super- 
intendent of Logan County, 1911-1915. State Normal and 
Industrial School, 1915. 

History and Education 



WALTER M. DEWEY. Western State Normal School, Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan, 1912. Special student, University of Wis- 
consin, 1913-1914; student, Stout Institute; Supervisor of 
Manual Training, Norway, Michigan, 1912-1915. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

Cabinet Making 
Manual Training 

LULU M; POTTS, A. B., Simpson College, 1914; Principal of 
High School, Casey, Iowa, 1914-1915; Graduate Normal 
School of Physical Education, Battle Creek, Mich., 1916. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1916. 

Physical Education for Women 

ESTHER WARD, B. Mus., Graduate Northwestern University 
School of Music 1910; Pupil of Victor Heinze, Chicago, 
1910-1911; Concert training in Berlin 1911-1912; Teacher of 
Music, Grand Prairie Seminary, Onarga, Illinois, 1912-1915; 
Teacher of Music, Seattle, Wash., 1915-1916. State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1916. 

Piano and Harmony 

LOUIS P. COOK, B. S., University of Illinois. Special student, 
State Normal School Bellingham, Washington, Ass'stant 
coach University of Illinois, Member of the Illinois National 
Guard for three years. Player and manager of professional 
baseball several years. Coach Anacortes (Wash.) High 
School, 1915-1916. State Normal and Industrial School, 
1916. 

Athletic Director 
Military Science 

CHARLES C. HALE, Muskingham College; Ohio University; 
Gregg School, Chicago; Teacher in the public schools of 
Ohio, four years. State Normal and Industrial School, 1916. 

Commercial Arts 

JAMES R. JAMIESON, B. S., North Dakota Agricultural Col- 
lege; Assistant Engineer, Fargo, Filtration Plant; Practical 
Farm Machinist. State Normal and Industrial School 
(winter term) 1917. 

Assistant in Farm Engineering 



MOLLIE C. MERKLEIN. Graduate of the Milwaukee Nor- 
mal School, Kindergarten Department; Wausau Kindergar- 
ten Training School. Student, University of Chicago. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1913. 

Primary Critic 

F. B. PURDY, Superintendent of Ellendale City Schools. 

Director of Obsbervation in Teaching 

FANNY C. CRAWFORD. Salt City Business College, Hutch- 
inson, Kansas, 1914. State Normal and Industrial School, 
1914. 

Secretary to the President 
Registrar 

FRED WALZ, Student State Normal and Industrial School. 

Assistant in the Physics Laboratory 

MRS. ELLA DUNCAN 

Matron 

FRED RITMILLER 

Head Janitor 






General Information 

PURPOSE AKD SCOPE OF THE SCHOOL 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was 
established by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance with 
a section of the state constitution providing for its creation. 
The revised law of 190? relating to this school reads as fol- 
lows : 

"That the institution located at Ellendale, Dickey county, 
North Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial 
School, the object of such school being to provide instruction 
in a comprehensive way in wood and iron work and the vari- 
ous other branches of domestic economy as a co-ordinate 
branch of education, together with mathematics, drawing and 
the other school studies and to prepare teachers in the science 
of education and the art of teaching in the public schools with 
special reference to manual training." 

The report of the State Board of Regents contains the 
following statement of policy: "The Normal and Industrial 
School at Ellendale should prepare teachers for the elementary 
schools of the state on the same basis as other normal schools. 
In addition to its work as a normal school it should, because of 
its equipment for instruction in industrial' subjects, continue to 
give instruction in these subjects." 

It is believed that with this broad but well defined mission 
the Normal and Industrial School offers superior advantages 
to the young people of the state. Educational thought of the 
day is constantly emphasizing more and more the practical 
and everyday duties and problems of life along with the pro- 
cesses of formal culture. This school is well equipped to give 
this many sided and full preparation for complete life. 

A cordial invitation to visit the school is extended to all 
persons who may be interested in school work, and especially 
to those engaged in educational work. The school will wel- 
come inquiries concerning teachers trained in its different de- 
partments. There is a demand for such teachers and public 
school officials will find that it is the purpose of the admin- 
istration of the school to place its graduates so that they will 
serve the state with credit to themselves and the interests in- 
volved. 



10 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

LOCATION 

Ellendale, in which the State Normal and Industrial School 
is located, is a beautiful little city in the center of a good! 
agricultural region. It is the county seat of Dickey county, 
and is on both the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, and the 
Great Northern railways, and easy connections are made with 
the Soo Line, the Midland, and the Northern Pacific rail- 
ways. 

The burned portions of the city are being rapidly rebuilt with 
fine fire-proof business blocks and new homes. There is abun- 
dant room for all students. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the State Normal and Industrial School 
consists of five main buildings, a foundry, a demonstration 
farm and an athletic field. 

DACOTAH HALL. This is a thoroly modern three story 
brick building and is an unusually attractive home for young 
women. The reception halls and society rooms are unusually 
pleasing. Here the young women of the school are surrounded 
by a stimulating and Christian influence. The purpose of the 
administration of the hall is to make it, not a boarding house, 
but a home, where every effort may be put forth to main- 
tain the amenities of life, which prevail in homes of influence, 
refinement and good cheer. It is believed that the social life 
which the hall offers is one of the most valuable parts of the 
student's education while here. The building is arranged to 
accommodate nearly one hundred students, and is modern thru- 
out, having a complete equipment of bathrooms, toilet rooms, 
steam heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are well 
lighted and well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by the 
students themselves. Each young lady intending to reside at 
tfye hall should bring at least three sheets, three pillow cases, 
blankets, towels, soap and napkins. Preference in choice of 
rooms is given in order of application. The heahh and com- 
fort of the students are the first consideration, and all mat- 
ters relating to food, hygiene and sanitation are carefully 
observed. 

Living expenses, including board, room, light, heat, and use 
of laundry and bath rooms, are $15.00 per month of four weeks. 
Table board is $3.25 per week. The rate is exceedingly low, 
when one considers the completeness of the service offered. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 1 1 

The table board is excellent and the building is finely equipped. 
Single meals and meals to guests are 20 cents each. Bills are 
payable one month in advance. No discount is made for ab- 
sences of less than a week except in the case of regular vaca- 
tions, as indicated in the calendar. Students are required to 
take care of their own rooms. Mail is taken to the postoffice 
and delivered twice a day. 

CARNEGIE HALL. This is a four story pressed brick 
structure, beautiful and commodious. In it are found the Nor- 
mal Department, Departments of Science, English, Mathematics, 
Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the Li- 
brary. In each department the equipment is such that stu- 
dents may reap the most generous returns from their efforts. 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Physiography are taught in 
laboratories in the most approved manner; the Department of 
English has access to abundant literature, the Commercial De- 
partment is provided with typewriters, duplicators, Edison dic- 
tation phonograph records, etc. ; the Department of Music owns 
nine upright pianos for practice and teaching purposes and a 
Mason & Hamlin Baby Grand for concert playing and accom- 
panying in vocal music ; the Department of Fine Arts is equip- 
ped with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, 
lockers, kiln for firing china, etc.; the library is generously pro- 
vided with fiction, history, biography, scientific works, refer- 
ence texts, etc., is equipped with a card catalog and Poole's In- 
dex, and is gradually accumulating bound volumes of the stand- 
ard magazines. 

HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING. A three story red 
brick building houses the Department of Domestic Science and 
Art. The department occupies the entire upper floor, and the 
lower floor in part, and is equipped with sewing machines, 
charts, lockers, tables, desks, cooking utensils, ranges, individ- 
ual gas stoves and ovens. It also has the necessary demonstra- 
tion table, dishes, silverware, linen, glassware, etc., for the din- 
ing room. 

MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING. This is a two story red 
brick structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The departments of 
Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the up- 
per floor and are equipped with drafting benches, lathes, 
benches, individual and special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, 
tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the 
Department of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is 



12 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

equipped with engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, 
hack saw, grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas en- 
gines is equipped with a twenty-five-horse-power Ideal engine, 
a twenty-horse-power horizontal side crank Howell engine, a 
twenty-horse-power automatic gasoline engine, a Case traction 
engine, a Gaar-Scott dismounted traction engine, a 15-30 gas 
tractor, a four-horse-power stationary engine and boiler com- 
plete for demonstration purposes, an International portable gas 
engine, a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine, calorimet- 
ers, Crosby steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction 
brake, water meter, injector, pumps, traps, boiler attachments, 
etc. 

ARMORY. This is a two story red brick building. The 
first floor is occupied in part by the locker rooms, and in part 
by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft 
forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor consti- 
tutes the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with 
dumb bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bars, traveling rings, spring 
board, vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for physi- 
cal training ; and with shower baths and lockers. 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
buildings, has been reserved for a demonstration farm. One 
section has been fenced for cultivation. Each of the demon- 
stration strips averages one-tenth of an acre in area and has been 
carefully cultivated and valuable results have been obtained. 

A small stock barn has been built and several 'head of live 
stock are kept both for their utility and for class study on the 
school farm. 

ATHLETIC FIELD. The N-I Athletic Field is 288 feet 
wide by 336 feet long, enclosed, and in it are found the base- 
ball diamond, foot-ball field, out-door basket-ball field, rifle 
range and grand stand. Here are held the out-of-door meets 
and the target practice of Company A. Excellent tennis courts 
are maintained by a student-faculty tennis association. 

MODEL SCHOOL. Arrangements have been made whereby 
the Ellendale City Schools give our normal students superior 
privileges in model school work. The city school grounds are 
conveniently located two blocks from the State school campus, 
and the building is a new $60,000 structure modern in every 
respect. This affords our senior normal students an opportunity 
to do teaching and observation under most favorable conditions. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 13 



ADMISSION 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral char- 
acter, who has completed the common school course and re- 
ceived a diploma, will be admitted without examination. A 
preparatory course is maintained for those students who have 
not the home facilities for completing the eighth grade. Stu- 
dents incomplete in common school subjects must expect to 
make up work under special arrangement. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will be 
admitted upon their credentials. 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial de- 
partments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice 
of parents and teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. 
This choice having been once made, no pupil will be permitted 
to change his course or to drop a subject except for the most 
important considerations and then only upon recommendation 
of the instructor and consent of the president. A student who 
voluntarily drops a subject without proper authority will be 
dropped from all classes until officially reinstated. 

CREDITS 

The unit of credit is a term's work in a subject, three units 
of credit constituting a year's work in a subject. No credit is 
given for less than a term's work. Credit for summer school 
work will be given under arrangements satisfactory to the de- 
partments concerned. Credits are given in terms of percent- 
age, 75 per cent being the passing grade. 

The letter "I" is used to indicate that work in a subject is 
incomplete and that a grade will be given when the required 
work is accomplished during the same or succeeding school 
year. The letter "C" is used to indicate that the work is so 
nearly up to a passing grade"" that the student may continufe 
the subject and when the work in the subject is satisfactorily 
completed a passing grade will be given for the term's work 
that was conditioned. The letter "F" is used to indicate fail- 
ure. The student receiving this mark must take the work over 
again to receive credit. 



14 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

In subjects requiring little or only occasional outside study, 
as shop work, cooking, etc., two periods of laboratory or reci- 
tation work are required daily to receive full credit. 

In the Acamedic Course four credit subjects are considered 
full work. In the other courses (except in the Farm Engineer- 
ing course) where there is considerable shop and laboratory 
work, five credit subjects constitute full work. In exception- 
al cases more than five credit subjects may be taken by faculty 
permission. 

To obtain such permission the student must have demon- 
strated exceptional scholarship in previous work and must show 
study periods of one hour for each subject. 

GYMNASTICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied young 
men in Military Drill to conform to the state requirements as 
set forth in Chapter 167 of the Session Laws of 1909 : 

"The State Normal and Industrial School is authorized and 
required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Mili- 
tary Science, under such rules and regulations as the faculty 
of said institution may prescribe." 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied students 
in gymnastics. In special cases and for good reasons students 
may be excused from military drill or gymnastics by vote of 
the faculty upon petition. 

DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

An eighth grade graduate may earn credits for an elemen- 
tary second grade certificate in one year and one summer ses- 
sion or credits for an elementary first grade certificate in two 
years. 

The holder of a good second grade certificate may earn cred- 
its for a first grade certificate (elementary) in one year or in 
two summer sessions. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in one year's work beyond a four- 
year high school course, entitles the holder to a second grade 
professional state certificate for two years, and after nine 
months' successful experience in teaching, the holder of this 
diploma is entitled to a second grade professional certificate 
valid for five years and renewable in the discretion of the 
State Board of Education which provides the foregoing regu- 
lations. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 15 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a four- 
year high school course, entitles the holder to a second grade 
professional certificate for two years, and after nine months' 
successful experience in teaching, the holder of this diploma 
is entitled to a second grade professional certificate valid for 
life. 

Graduates from the Mechanic Arts Course, Home Econom- 
ics Course, or Fine Arts Course, are entitled to a Special Cer- 
tificate, which entitles the holder to teach that special art in the 
schools of the state. 

RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

r 
As a number of its students sometime after graduation wish 
to go further in their academic training, arrangements have been 
made whereby graduates from this school are admitted to the 
following institutions with the standing indicated: 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. The State 
University of North Dakota admits graduates upon their cre- 
dentials, allowing full credit for courses completed and ad- 
vanced standing as follows : 

"(1) Students who have graduated from a four-year high 

school course and who have also graduated from a one-year 

professional course in an accredited Normal School are allowed 

one years credit (30 semester hours) on advanced standing. 

"(2) Graduates from the two-year North Dakota Normal 

Schools and Normal Schools having equal standing, who are 
also graduates of first-class high schools, will be granted 60 
units of advanced standing if they have completed all of the 
prescribed requirements for admission, and provided the sub- 
jects offered for advanced standing are in harmony with the 
group requirements for graduation. 

"(3) Students who are not high school graduates but have 
completed the regular four-year or five-year normal course are 
given 15 and 45 credits respectively on advanced standing (in- 
cluding in either case 4 credits in Psychology and 12 in Edu- 
cation.)" 

NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. The 
North Dakota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore 
year of its Agricultural and General Science Courses all grad- 
uates of this school. 



16 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. Graduates of 
the Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and Trig- 
onometry are admitted to Armour Institute without examina- 
tion and receive three years' credit in shop work. 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping, are admitted 
without examination. 

Students of the State Normal-Industrial School are ad- 
mitted to other standard schools and colleges upon their cre- 
dentials. 

PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are 
open to all students for competition: 

(1) PRIZE IN ORATORY. The State Normal Industrial 
School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first 
place in oratory under such rules as a committee of the facul- 
ty may prescribe. A silver medal is offered to the student who 
wins second place in oratory. 

(2) MILITARY PRIZE. (First.) The State Normal and 
Industrial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins 
first place in individual drill at the annual military contest. 
Won in 1917, by Emil Bjur. 

(3) MILITARY PRIZE. (Second.) A bronze medal of- 
fered by the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet 
winning second honors in the individual drill at the annual 
military contest. Won in 1917, by Maro Jahr. 

(4) DECLAMATORY PRIZE. The State Normal and In- 
dustrial School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains 
first place in declamation under such rules as the faculty may 
prescribe. A second prize of a silver medal is offered the 
student winning second place. 

(5) ORIGINAL STORY PRIZE. This prize, given by 
the State Normal and Industrial School, is a gold medal, and 
is awarded to the student who prepares the best original short 
story. A silver medal will be awarded the student who pre- 
pares the second best original short story. The stories winning 
first and second prizes shall become the property of the school. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG '17 

(6) ESSAY PRIZE. Mr. B. Rosenthal offers $10.00 in 
cash to the young man who writes the best essay on "Why the 
Man Who Pays His Debts is Better off Financially Than the 
One Who . Does Not." Mr. Rosenthal requires that the sub- 
ject be brought out as a business proposition rather than a mor- 
al one, as the latter is taken for granted. 

(7) ESSAY PRIZE. Dr. M. F. Merchant offers $5.00 in 
cash to the student who writes the best essay on "The Cause 
of the Internal Troubles in Mexico." 

(8) PRIZE IN DOMESTIC ARTS. L. S. Jones & Com- 
pany offers $5.00 worth of merchandise, to be selected by the 
winner, to the young woman who does the best work in the 
making of a white waist. 

(9) PRIZE IN MECHANIC ARTS. The Weldun Com- 
pany offers a pocket knife to the young man who exhibits the 
best workmanship on a piece of furniture, to be no less com- 
plicated than a table or chair. 

Commencement Honors. The senior student who has the 
highest average grade in his class standings will be the vale- 
dictorian of his class. The student with second highest grades 
will receive second honors at commencement. 



DISCIPLINE 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly con- 
duct, and prompt obedience to lawful authority are impera- 
tive. Fortunate is the school in which the sentiment of the 
student body commends manly conduct. This is the type of 
discipline most desired at this school. In no sense is the State 
Normal and Industrial School a reform school and students 
who fail to yield a full and cheerful compliance to all re- 
quirements necessary for successful work and the honor of the 
school will be promptly dismissed. Discipline is educative 
when reasonable and intelligible. This is the guiding thought 
with which all discipline is administered. 

EXPENSES 

An incidental fee of $5.00 a term is charged all students, ex- 
cept those taking only special lessons in music and fine arts. 
This amount includes all miscellaneous fees charged in former 



18 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

years, but does not include materials in home economics and 
manual training consumed for personal use, which are charged 
to the student at cost. Locker rent, twenty-five cents. 

Fees for private lessons in music are $12.00 for a term of 
twelve lessons. Private lessons in fine arts are $9.00 for a 
term of twelve lessons. Piano rent is $3.00 per term of three 
months. 

Extra fee for late enrollment, fifty cents, except in cases of 
a student's first enrollment for the year. 

Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $3.75 per week, payable 
by the month, in advance. Good room and board may be had 
in private families at prices ranging from $4 per week upwards. 
Many students rent rooms and board themselves. Board and 
room rent, the chief items of expense, range from $135 to 
$175 per year of 36 weeks. These very reasonable rates will be 
maintained so long as prices will permit, but the school reserves 
the right to advance price of board if prices on food stuffs 
continue to advance. 

The following deposit fees (subject to return) are required 
of those using the material : Drawing set, $7.50 ; locker key, 
fifty cents; chemistry breakage, $2.00. 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has 
been set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is 
open to all students until 5 :00 o'clock school days. Arrange- 
ments are made by which students can draw books for use at 
times when the library is closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and 
catalogued ; a cabinet card catalogue ; bound volumes of the 
leading magazines ; Poole's index ; congressional records, gov- 
ernment reports and much other valuable material. New addi- 
tions are constantly being made. Each department of the 
school has a well selected line of books for reference work. 
The leading magazines and newspapers are at the disposal of 
students. A trained librarian is in charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program, may, 
upon recommendation of the classification committee, arrange 
for special work. All such students, however, must satisfy the 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 19 

committee that their preparation is sufficient to warrant their 
enrollment in the subjects desired. No ' student deemed 
deficient in the fundamentals will be permitted to elect the arts 
exclusively, but a fair balance will be maintained between so- 
called intellectual and manual training subjects. 



LITERAKY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are three literary societies maintained for the purpose 
of affording practice in speaking in public and to train in de- 
bating. 

The Alphian is the organization of the young women, and the 
Sigma Pi Iota and Mechanic Arts Society those of the young 
men. 

A glee club and an orchestra are maintained. The course 
in music in public schools has been considerably enlarged 
and made more interesting and valuable to the student in 
reference to general education. Several recitals and concerts 
are given during the year. A year's credit in music may be 
earned by faithful work in band, orchestra or glee club, the 
number of credits to be earned in this way being limited to a 
total of three. 



YOUNG WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A 
voluntary organization wh'ch aims to promote Christian life 
is maintained among the young women of the school. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A branch 
of the Young Men's Christian Association is maintained under 
the management of the students. 

ATHLETICS. Foot-ball, basket-ball, base-ball and track ath- 
letics are organized and games are played under supervision 
of the faculty. A regular athletic director is employed, who has 
charge of all athletic activities. The coach and captains of the 
teams for 1917 are: 

Lours P. Cook Athletic Director 

George Brown Captain of Football Team 

Jay Ashley Captain of Basketball Team 

Thomas A. Lee Captain of Baseball Team 



20 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

A splendid entertainment course is maintained by the school. 
For 1917-18 the following are some of the numbers chosen : 
The Chicago Orchestra Choir, Filipino Singers and Players, The 
Irish Players, Chicago Male Quartet, Dr. Wickersham, Evelyn 
Bargelt. 

A special student rate for a season ticket is made, the 
regular price of season tickets being two dollars and fifty cents. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

A joint summer school is maintained in cooperation with the 
counties of Sargent, Mcintosh, Logan and Dickey. A 
six weeks' session immediaely following the regular school year 
is held. Students and teachers may take work and earn cred- 
its to be applied toward the completion of any course. A 
special summer school bulletin in published, announcing the 
work of this session of the school. A copy may be obtained 
for the asking. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of the city take a deep interest in 
the students, many of whom are identified with their activities. 
Students are urged to attend the church of their choice. Bible 
study classes covering the state high school syllabus are main- 
tained by the various church organizations of the city. These 
are under competent leaders and students who successfully pur- 
sue the course may earn a half years credit to be accepted as 
an elective in any course. 

TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Study this catalogue thoroly. 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Bring with you such text books as you may have. 

Write the president that you are coming. 

Come with a determination to make this school year the best 
year of your life. 

Bring a letter of recommendation from your pastor or teach- 
er. This is not required, but serves as a letter of introduction. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



21 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The following courses of study have been carefully arranged 
to comply with the laws of the state and the regulations of 
the state board of education. 

Unless otherwise specified all subjects require five recita- 
tions per week. Two laboratory or shop periods are required 
for one period of credit. 



TWO YEAR ELEMENTARY NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a first grade elementary certificate 



Fall 
Grammar 
Lit. of Grades 
Arithmetic 
Pub. School 
Mus. or Draw. 
U. S. History 
*Elective 



Adv. Geography 
Phyisology 
Ele. Psychology 
Civics 



Winter 
Grammar 
Geography 
Arithmetic 
Pub. School 
Mius. or Draw. 
U. S. History 
Elective 



*Elective 



Spring 
Grammar 
Geography 
Pen. & Spell. 
Pub. School 
Mus. or Draw. 
U. S. History 
Elective 



Summer 
Reading 
Pen. & Spell. 
Physiology 



SECOND YEAR 

Am. Literature 

Botany 

Ele. Psychology 

Civics l / 2 

Pedagogy */ 2 

Elective 



Am. Literature 

Botany 

Ele. Psychology 

Pedagogy 

Elective 



Drill or gymnasium thruout the course. 

*Electives must be from the following: Agriculture, Manual 
Training, Home Economics, Algebra, Geometry. 



22 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



FOUK YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Eng. I (Gram.) 

Lit. of Grades 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (V 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (V 2 ) 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Normal Grammar 
Elective_ 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Psychology 
Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

P. S. Music (y 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (V 2 ) 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

American History 
Psychology 
School Admin. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Pen. & Spell. 

P. S. Music (V 2 ) 

P. S. Drawing (y 2 ) 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Political Science 
Psychology 
Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



23 



FIVE YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Lit. of Grades 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Elective 
*Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Normal Grammar 
Elective 
Gvmnasium 



Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geometry. 
Modern History 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Gvmnasium 



American History American History Political Science 

Physics Physics Physics 

Psychology Psychology Psychology 

Latin I or German I Latin I or German I Latin I or German I 

Elective Elective Elective 

Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium 



Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Lat. II or Germ. 
Elective 
Elective 



FIFTH YEAR 

School Admin. 
Obs. & Teaching 
II Lat. II or Germ. 
Elective 
Elective 



Prin. of Ed. 
Obs. & Teaching 
II Lat. II or Germ. II 
Elective 
Elective 



*See requirements under Military Science and Physical Educa- 
tion. 



24 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



ONE TEAR NORMAL BEJOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 



Fall Term 

Psychology 

Hist, of Ed. 

Normal Grammar 

Adv. Pedagogy 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 

Psychology 

Prin. of Ed. 

Rev. & Meth. 

Obs. & Teaching 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

Psychology 

School Admin. 

Rev. & Meth. 

Obs. & Teaching 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



TWO TEAR NORMAL BETOND HIGH SCHOOL 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 



Fall Term 

Psychology 

Normal Grammar 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 



Spring Term 

Psychology 
Rev. & Meth. 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Hist, of Ed. Prin. of Ed. School Admin. 

Adv. Pedagogy Obs. & Teaching Obs. & Teaching 

Elective Elective Elective 

Elective Elective Elective 

Elective Elective Elective 

Drill or Gym. Drill or Gym. Drill or Gym. 

In the two year normal course for high school graduates the 

major elective will determine the course from which the stu- 
dent receives his diploma. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



25 



NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COUESE 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Lit. of Grades 
Agriculture 
Arithmetic 
Cookery I. (y 2 ) 
Sewing! (%) 
Gymnasium 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Physiology 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Cookery I. (y 2 ) 

Sewing I. (V 2 ) 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Cookery I. (y 2 ) 
Sewing I. (.V 2 ) 
Gymnasium 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. English III. English III. 

PI. Geom. pi. Geom. PI. Geom. 

Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry 

Normal Grammar Rev. and Meth. Rev. and Meth. 

H. H. Management H. H. Management Home Nursing 

Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium 



American History 
Psychology 
Millinery 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 



Hist, of Ed. 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Special Methods 



Cookery II. (%) 
Sewing II. (%>) 
Elective 



FOURTH YEAR 

American History 
Psychology 
Textiles 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 

FIFTH YEAR 

Prin. of Ed. 

Teaching 

Nutritional 

Physiology 

Dietetics 
Cookery II. (%) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Elective 



Political Science 
Psychology 
Art Needlework 
Physics 

Adv. Chemistry 
Bacteriology 



School Admin. 
Observation 
Home and Social 
Economy 

Cookery II. (%) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Elective 



26 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Physiology 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Man. Tr. I. 

Drill 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Man. Tr. II. 

Drill 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern Hi'story 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. III. 
Gymnasium 



American History 
Solid Geom. 

Psychology 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Geography 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Man. Tr. I. 

Drill 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient Historj 
Elective 
Man. Tr. II. 
Drill 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. III. 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

American History 

Solid Geom. (V 2 ) 

Adv. Algebra (y 2 ) 

Psychology 

Physics 

Elective 

Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR 

Engines 
Prin. of Ed. 
Elective 
Teaching 
Man. Tr. V. 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Geography 
Agricultui e 
Pen. & Spell. 
Man. Tr. 1. 
Drill 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Man. Tr. II. 

Drill 



English ill. 

PI. Geom. 

Method & Reviews 

Chemistry 

Man. Tr. III. 

Gymnasium 



Political Science 

Adv. Algebra 

Psychology 

Physxs 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



Ap. Mechanics 
Hist, of Ed. 
Elective 
Cost Keeping 
Man. Tr. V. 

Manual Training IV and Electricity are offered among the 
electives in this course. 



Ap. Mechanics 
School Admin. 
Elective 

Special Methods 
Alan. Tr. V. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



5*7 



MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Elective 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Mech. Arts I. 

Drill 

English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Mech. Arts II. 

Drill 

English III. 

PI. Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 

American History 
Solid Geom. 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Elective 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spell. 
Mech. Arts I. 
Drill 



English I. 

Elective 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Mech. Arts I. 

Drill 

SECOND YEAR 
English II. 
Algebra 

Ancient History 
Elective 

Mech. Arts II. 
Drill 

THIRD YEAR 
English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Chemistry 
Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 
American History 
Solid. Geom. (y 2 ) 
Adv. Algebra (%) Adv. Algebra 



English II. 

Algebra 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Mech. Arts II. 

Drill 



English III. 

PI. Geom. 

Chemistry 

Elective 

Mech. Arts III. 

Gymnasium 

Political Science 



Physics Physics Physics 

Elective Elective Elective 

Mech. Arts IV. Mech. Arts IV. Mech. Arts IV. 

Gymnasium Gymnasium Gymnasium 

FIFTH YEAR 
Ap. Mechanics Engines Ap. Mechanics 

Trig. & Surv. Trig. & Surv. Trig. & Surv. 

Cost Keeping Elective Elective 

Electricity Electricity Electricity 

Mech. Arts V. Mech. Arts V. Mech. Arts V. 

Electives : English IV, Latin or German, Fine Arts, Com- 
mercial Arts, Industrial Physics or Advanced Mechanic Arts 
(Mechanic Arts V), Music. 

Mechanic Arts V : One year's work selected from the fol- 
lowing: Carpentry and Building, Building Construction, Join- 
ery and Cabinet-Making, Concrete Construction, Electric Wir- 
ing, Machine Shop Practice, Interior Finishing and Painting, 
Engines, Blacksmithing, Machine Drawing, Architectural Draw 
ing, and Plumbing and Steam Fitting. 



28 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Cookery I. (%) 

Sewing I. (%) 

Gymnasium 



English II.. 

Ancient History 

Algebra 

Physiology 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. 
Elective 
Millinery 
Chemistry 
Household 
Management 



Cookery II. (y 2 ) 
Sewing II. (y 2 ) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Elective 



Elective 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Elective 

Cookery I. (y 2 ) 

Sewing I. (y 2 ) 

Gymnasium 

SECOND YEAR 

English II.. 

Ancient History 

Algebra 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
Elective 
Textiles 
Chemistry 
Household 
Management 

FOURTH YEAR 

Cookery II. (%) 
Sewing II. (V 2 ) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Nutritional 

Physiology 

Dietetics 
Elective 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Agriculture 

Elective 

Elective 

Cookery I. (y 2 ) 

Sewing I. (y 2 ) 

Gymnasium 



English II.. 

Ancient History 

Algebra 

Botany 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III. 

Elective 

Art Needlework 

Chemistry 

Home Nursing 



Cookery II. (y 2 ) 
Sewing II. (V 2 ) 
Adv. Chemistry 

Bacteriology 
Physics 
Home and Social 

Economy 

Elective 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



COMMERCIAL-ACADEMIC COURSE 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Economic History- 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Raw Materials 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Algebra 

Commercial Geog. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

Geometry 
Ancient History 
Business English 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Comm. Arithmetic 

Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Algebra 

Commercial Geog. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Geometry 
Ancient History 
Commercial Law 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III. 
American History 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III. English III. 

American History Political Science 
Bookkeeping or Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand Shorthand 

Elective Elective 

Elective Elective 

Gymnasium Gymnasium 

If Bookkeeping be taken in the first two years then language 

may be taken as the elective. If shorthand is taken, then the 

typewriting should be taken. 

Certain regulations have been adopted regarding the Com- 
mercial-Academic Course, with which the student must make 
himself familiar. An enrollment in these courses must be made 
by the Director of the Commercial Department. 



30 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Fall Term 

Eng. I. (Gram.) 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. , 



English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Elective 

American History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



ACADEMIC COURSE 

FIRST YEAR 
Winter Term 

English I. 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 

THIRD YEAR 

English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

FOURTH YEAR 

Elective 

American History 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 

English I. 

Ancient History 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English II. 

Algebra 

Elective 

Elective 

Drill or Gym. 



English III. 
PI. Geom. 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Elective 

Political Science 
Physics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Note 1. All electives must be from accredited high school 
subjects approved by the enrolling officer. 

Note 2. Students expecting to enter engineering courses 
should elect Higher Algebra and Solid Geometry. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



31 



TWO YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE 



Fall Term 

English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Economic History 
Civics 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter Term 

English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 

SECOND YEAR 

English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Business English 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 

English I. 
Comm. Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Commercial Law 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 



(Two Winter Terms) 



First Year 
Short Course English 
Farm Arithmetic 
Agriculture 
Farm Mechanics I. 
Carpentry ( V 2 ) 
Blacksmithing (%) 
Engine Lectures 
Gymnasium 



Second Year 
Business Papers and English 
Farm Accounting 
Farm Mechanics II. 
Carpentry II. (V 2 ) 
Blacksmithing II. (V 2 ) 
Steam and Gas Engines and 

Boilers 
Mechanical Drawing (^) 
Machine Shop Practice (%) 
Gymnasium 



32 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



SHORT COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



First Year 
Short Course English 
Short Course Arithmetic 
Cooking (4 da.) 
Food Study (1 da.) 
Sewing 

Art Needlework 
Gymnasium 



Second Year 
Dressmaking 
Cooking II. 
Textiles and Basketry 
Home Nursing 
Household Management 
Gymnasium 



THREE YEAR PIANO COURSE 



First Year 
Piano 

Harmony 3-5 
Mus. Appre. 1-5 
Mus. History 1-6 
German 
English I 



Second Year 
Harmony 3-5 
Piano 

Mus. Appre. 1-5 
Mus. History 1-5 
Voice 
English II 



Third Year 
Piano 

Ensemble Playing 
Nor. Piano Meth. 
Psychology 
English III 



THREE YEAR VOICE COURSE 



First Year 
Voice 
Piano 

Mus. History 1-5 
Ear Training 1-5 
Harmony 3-5 
English I 



Second Year 
Voice 
Piano 

Sight Singing 1-5 
Mus. Appreciation 
German 
English II 



Third Year 
Voice 

Nor. P. S. Mus 1-2 
Psychology 
German 
English III 





&WA 



pHj ? rr 





rrri rm m 







NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 33 



Description of Courses 

EDUCATION AND NORMAL COURSES 

One of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated and trained teachers to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public school 
conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other re- 
quirement relating to education is of such pressing importance. 
The Act which defines the mission of the State Normal and 
Industrial School requires it to train teachers "in the science 
of education and the art of teaching in the public schools, with 
special reference to manual training." 

The school maintains an organized bureau 6f recommendations 
to assist its graduates in securing positions to teach. 

ELEMENTARY PEDAGOGY. A brief course in the prin- 
ciples and methods of teaching and general school management 
offered to students who are unable to remain in school a suf- 
ficient length of time to complete a full course. This course 
includes a brief study of the presentative, representative and 
reflective powers; the ends of education; the means; the prin- 
ciples involved; general methods; methods in particular 
branches, etc. 

ELEMENTARY PSYCHOLOGY. Three terms of elemen- 
tary psychology are required in the two year Normal Course 
leading to a first grade elementary certificate. The work con- 
sists of a general study of the characteristics and laws of men- 
tal life and the functions of the various mental processes. A 
brief course in physiological psychology is included. 

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY. One year is devoted to this 
subject, which is required in all courses leading to a second 
grade professional certificate. The first two terms are given 
to a general study of the subject similar to the course in ele- 
mentary psychology, but more comprehensive. The third term 
is devoted to child study. The three terms of elementary psy- 
chology will be accepted in lieu of part of the advanced 
psychology. 



34 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

HISTORY OF EDUCATION. A study of the educational 
systems of the chief nations of antiquity ; education in its re- 
lation to Christianity; the Renaissance, the Reformation and 
the forces operative in our own era; a study of the life and 
practices of the chief educational reformers in the light of 
prevailing theories. Numerous outside readings and class re- 
views are required. 

PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION. A broad conception of 
the principles of education is here presented. Especial attention 
is given to such themes as the functions of teaching and of 
subject matter, motivation, correlation, concentration, etc. The 
aim is to familiarize the student with such principles of educa- 
tion as will enable him to meet intelligently problems of class 
room instruction. A professional thesis is required of each one 
completing this course. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. This course is to consider 
problems of importance not ordinarily met in the class room 
instruction. The relationship of officers, teachers, parents, and 
pupils as well as questions of organization and administration 
pertaining to the state law, course of study, daily programs, ex- 
aminations, promotions and matters of discipline will be dis- 
cussed. 

PRIMARY METHODS. A course designed especially for 
those who anticipate teaching in the primary grades. Indus- 
trial work, story telling, phonetic reading, primary songs and 
number work is emphasized from the view point of daily plans. 
The work is principally lectures and students are required to 
make carefully written reports. 

ADVANCED PEDAGOGY. This is especially for Senior 
students who enroll for observation and teaching. It is de- 
signed to meet the problems peculiar to the observation and 
teaching work. 

LITERATURE IN THE GRADES. This consists of a care- 
ful study of some of the classics required by the state course 
of study for the grades. In this work the aim is to bring out 
not only the thought, but also the beauty, form and manner of 
the presentation and make the prospective teacher familiar 
with the subject matter of reading. 

GEOGRAPHY. Two terms' work is required in Normal 
courses. This includes a review of descriptive, political and 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 35 

commercial geography with methods of teaching. Some study 
is also made of the elements of mathematical and physical 
geography. 

REVIEWS AND METHODS. The subject matter of arith- 
metic, reading, language, grammar, history and geography re- 
viewed; the principles and methods of teaching emphasized. 
The work is especially designed to train students to teach. The 
subject matter, teacher's aim, method, preparation and presen- 
tation are carefully considered with special reference to the 
grades. 

OBSERVATION AND TEACHING. Designed to train 
prospective teachers in the princ'ples and methods of effective 
teaching. The Ellendale city schools serve as the model school 
for the normal students, also opportunity for observation and 
teaching is found in the classes of the preparatory department, the 
department of manual training, the department of domestic 
science and arts. Both observation and teaching take place 
under the direct supervision of a tra : ned teacher, who is thor- 
oly capable not only of directing the efforts of pupil-teach- 
ers, but of offering the most helpful and painstaking criticism. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY. A course which considers the prob- 
lems of the rural community and especially the teacher's rela- 
tion to these problems. The school as a factor in community 
interests, and the reaction of teacher and community upon their 
common fields will be considered. This will be largely an in- 
vestigation course primarily for seniors in the normal courses, 
but is open to others with sufficient preparation to carry the 
work. Offered in the winter and summer terms. 

MECHANIC AKTS 

The purpose is two-fold : 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity 
for specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 

Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual 
arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for this 
work; no other school in the state is so well equipped. The 
shops and laboratories are well supplied with every modern 
appliance which can aid in acquiring practical knowledge of 
industrial subjects. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student work 
done in this department. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Mechanic Arts I. 

1. JOINERY. 

a. Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, filister, 
chisel, hammer, square, marking guage, bevel, boring bit and 
other hand tools, in the construction of the principal joints 
employed in carpentry and joinery. 

b. When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, use- 
ful articles are made, either for the use of the school or for the 
student. , 

c. Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as 
a desk, table, bookcase or other piece of useful furniture, in 
order that they may make further application of the principles 
they have learned. 

d. Advanced cabinet making; practice in the application of 
the principles of joinery in the construction of tables, chairs, 
settees, stands, pedestals, and cabinets of various designs. 
Pieces to be finished in approved manner. 

2. ELEMENTARY CABINET MAKING. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instru- 
ments, with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

c. Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in 
mechanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of con- 
struction. 

d. Orthographic projection. A knowledge of the use of 
planes in projection. This work, which is part of descriptive 
geometry, is the immediate foundation of mechanical drawing. 
In connection with it students are required ^to bring to class 
shop sketches or freehand drawings of various articles. In- 
strumental drawings are made from some of these sketches. 

Mechanic Arts II. 

I. FORGING. 

a. Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming an- 
gles from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms 
of welding iron and mild steel. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 37 

b. This course includes a number of useful articles, such as 
a bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, 
clevis, cold chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and 
hammer. 

Special attention is given to the study of the manufacture 
of different grades of steel, its hardening and tempering. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making 
and tempering machine tools. 

2. FOUNDRY PRACTICE. 

Molding and core work; melting and casting iron and brass; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices ; the mixing 
of iron; the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting of 
brass and other soft metals. 

Students make all castings for machine shop work. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental draw- 
ings, made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

c. Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

Mechanic Arts III. 

1. TURNERY. 

The course in wood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow-chuck and template turning, including exercises 
thru which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, con- 
cave curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow 
turning, together with exercises combining either a number, or 
all, of these operations. 

Useful articles in which the principles learned in (a) are ap- 
plied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for various 
tools, a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, stair bal- 
usters and various other useful articles. This work is carried 
further in its application in pattern making. 

2. PATTERN MAKING. 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given to 
the work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are made 
of a number of models which involve the more elementary 



38 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

problems in foundry practice ; these are followed by patterns 
of parts of machines, including a hand-wheel and blanks for 
a cam, gear-wheel and bevel-gear. 

3. ADVANCED CABINET MAKING. 

4. MECHANICAL DRAWING. ' 

a. Sheet Metal Patterns. Graphical methods of solving 
problems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their applica- 
tion in sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns 
of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All ar- 
ticles in this course of which patterns are made, are constructed 
either of metal or paper. 

b. Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story 
frame dwelling' or other frame building. This course is made 
very practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the 
floor, basement and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sec- 
tional wall views showing the construction ; and at least two 
views of the completed structure — the drawing including roof 
plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are 
drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building materials 
and labor is made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the 
complete set of plans. Special students are carrying this work 
further and are actually building models in the shop, in which 
the methods of construction are identical with those used in 
actual house building. 

Mechanic Arts IV. 

1. CHIPPING AND FILING. 

a. Exercises are given for the purpose of developing skill 
in the use of the file and the cold chisel. These tools are of 
especial value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for 
instance, in erecting and repairing machinery, whether in the 
shop or on the farm. Their usefulness is so well known, and 
the inability of the average man to use them properly is also 
so well known, that it seems proper to give them especial at- 
tention in this course. 

b. In connection with, and in addition to the above, a num- 
ber of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 

2. MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE. 

a. Machine tool making. Students make and temper the 
tools which they will use in their machine tool practice. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 39 

b. Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms 
of machine tools, directions for operating machines and keep- 
ing tools in order ; practice in centering and in plain, taper, 
and template turning, chucking, drilling, boring, external and 
internal thread cutting; hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

c. Tool and screzv making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard gauges, microm- 
eter and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps 
and dies, machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In 
this course the machine work is done On the articles cast in 
the foundry during the preceding year. The greater share of 
the machine tool practice of the entire course consists in ma- 
chining the products of the foundry. 

d. 'Class to do the machining and erecting of a small en- 
gine, a lathe, or some other project involving similar opera- 
tions. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Lettering and conventional representations of frequently 
recurring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, 
etc. 

b. The study and drawing of disc and shaft cams, to produce 
different forms of motion of both regular and intermittent. 

c. A study in elementary mechanism including different pro- 
cesses of obtaining straight line motion and graphic solution of 
allied problems. 

d. Design and drawing of different kinds of g^ar wheels, ob- 
taining the proper shape of teeth from the invoUte and cycloids. 
Drawing spur, mitre and bevel gears. 

Mechanic Arts V. 

1. SHOP WORK; (6 hours per week). 

Advanced cabinet making with special attention given to the 
selection of materials, design and finish is given to students 
choosing wood work. Advanced machine work, with special 
attention given to machine tool making is given to students 
choosing metal work. 

Note: Normal Manual Training students take up more the 
professional side of the work in the spring term. 

2. MECHANICAL DRAWING: (4 hours per week). 

The subject of Descriptive Geometry is treated in the form of 
lectures, where each problem is thoroughly explained and 



40 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

solved graphically before the class, which problems are later 
solved by each member of the class in the drafting room. Prob- 
lems dealing with the building trades are largely considered 
and practically applied so far as possible. 

3. NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING: (Spring term only). 
(a) Hand-work for Primary Grades. 

1. PAPER AND CARDBOARD CONSTRUCTION. This 
work is taken up as it should be presented in the public schools. 
The different steps in paper folding are given, developing into 
the construction of familiar articles. The use of paste and 
scissors is developed early in the course. Freehand cutting 
is given for training the eye in regard to form and for com- 
position. Portfolios, booklets, boxes, etc., are constructed of 
heavy paper and cardboard. 

2. CLAY MODELING AND POTTERY. Some train- 
ing is given in modeling type forms from simple objects in 
nature. The greater share of the time is devoted to the mak- 
ing of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces in- 
volving different methods of construction. In the third and 
fourth grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class is 
instructed in the craft of mould-made pieces and a few pieces 
are made by the class. Students glaze a part of their work. 

3. WEAVING AND BASKETRY. Weaving begins with 
the use of paper mats, different patterns being worked out in 
several media. The materials included are raffia, jute, common 
wool yarns and, for the fourth grade, hand-dyed worsted of 
the finest quality. Problems include pencil bags, book bags, 
holders, mats, special designed rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. 
Basketry consists of the problems used in elementary grades, 
simple rattan mats and baskets, handles, hinges, etc. Coiled 
mats and simple baskets are executed and a few methods of 
using raffia and constructive work are illustrated. 

4. THIN WOOD CONSTRUCTION. The assembling of 
thin pieces of wood by means of glue and braids to form minia- 
ture pieces of furniture; the construction of a miniature house. 
The work consists, in part, of a combination of wood and card- 
board. 

b. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 41 

(1) WOODWORK FOR FOURTH AND FIFTH 
GRADES. The purpose here is to train the prospective teacher 
in the simpler processes in wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction 
intended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater part, 
they are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in all courses, 
for original design. The work is similar in character to courses 
offered in the elementary grades of any first class public school 
system. The tools used are the knife, block plane, back saw, 
coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, carving punch, file, try-square, 
hammer, rule and pencil. For most of the exercises the ma- 
terial is prepared in thickness before being given to the stu- 
dent. Workmanlike methods are aimed at; blue prints of the 
course are made. 

(2) WOODWORK FOR THE SIXTH, SEVENTH AND 
EIGHTH GRADES. Here serious attention is first given to 
following the methods of the skilled mechanic. It is the aim 
to keep always in mind the interest and capacity of the pupils 
being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the 
public schools where there is an equipment of workbenches 
and a rather full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth grades 
there are numerous exercises in cabinet making in which the 
simpler methods of joinery are involved. The use of sand- 
paper, files, stains and varnish is introduced in finishing some 
of the pieces. 

c. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full 
Mechanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive 
exercises in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construc- 
tion, Wood Carving, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and De- 
sign. 

(1) MANUAL TRAINING DESIGN. Study of the ele- 
ments of design, line, dark and light and color and the appli- 
cation of the principles of harmony. The object of the instruc- 
tion is to develop appreciation through the study of art-struc- 
ture. The course begins with design in the abstract, har- 
monious arrangement of spaces being given special attention. 
Application of the theory of design in technical problems ; de- 
signs for furniture ; textiles, wall coverings, stained glass, in- 
teriors, etc. Problems worked out in the shop. 



42 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

4. APPLIED MECHANICS. The object of this course is 
to provide students w.th a practical statement of the principles 
of Mechanics essential to an intelligent interest in the con- 
structive arts. It embraces a study of simple framed structures, 
strength of materials, beams, riveted joints, shafts, springs, ele- 
mentary mechanism, simple machines, and hydraulics. 

5. ENGINES A^D BOILERS. The purpose of this term's 
work is to introduce to the Mechanic Arts student the general 
elementary principles of gas engines, and steam engines and 
boilers. A text is used, supplemented by work with engines in 
the laboratory. 

6. ELECTRICITY. One year of elementary work in elec- 
tricity beyond that given in physics is required of all mechanic 
arts students. Direct and alternating current machines and 
appliances ; carrying capacity and resistance of conductors ; 
wiring formulae and methods of installation; batteries, accu- 
mulators and theory of the magnetic circuit are some of the 
subjects briefly covered. A text book is used in connection 
with lectures and drafting room work. 

7. COST-KEEPING, METHODS AND REVIEWS AND 
SPECIAL METHODS. Only one term each of the above sub- 
jects is required from all students pursuing the Normal Man- 
ual Training Course. Mechanic Arts students take only cost- 
keeping. 

Cost-keeping, as a. iplied to the manual training shop, with 
the making of estin ates is about the extent of this work, 
which applies equally veil to other shops. 

One term of Methoas and Reviews, given in the Normal de- 
partment. See under Normal Courses. Special Methods is 
a subject largely professional with the manual training teacher 
and treats particularly of his or her problems concerning differ- 
ent systems and methods of presenting the subject. 

COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 

This course is planned to meet the most practical require- 
ments of young men on the up-to-date farm. A certificate of 
proficiency will be given upon a satisfactory completion of the 
work. The course extends over two winter terms and includes 
the following subjects: 

FARM ARITHMETIC. The work will involve fac- 
tors, fractions, decimals, denominate numbers, practical meas- 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 43 

urements, etc. Problems dealing with such subjects as mar- 
keting, measurements of walls, crops, cost of fences, buildings, 
silos, rations. 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH, (a) The course in Gram- 
mar is intended to give the students basis for oral and written 
composition, (b) The course in Language and Grammar, 
more elementary than course (a), is intended to give pupils 
a correct working knowledge of written and spoken English, 
(c) The course in Letter Composition is primarily for the 
young men, and includes such letters as the average farmer is 
obliged to write. Penmanship, spelling, punctuation, as well 
as form and expression of thought are emphasized, (d) The 
course in Reading is planned to give an acquaintance with cur- 
rent industrial literature related to other subjects of the 
course. The selections read are chosen for their practical util- 
ity, and getting the thought will receive more attention than 
formal expression. 

The student taking one of the short courses is expected to 
elect one or more of these courses, selection to be made on 
approval of enrolling officer. 

AGRICULTURE. An elementary study of the different 
kinds of soils, soil and water, the germination of seeds, require- 
ments in the growth of seedlings, conservation of moisture, 
soil fertility, rotation of crops, varieties of stock and stock 
breeding. 

FARM MECHANICS I. Study and application of levers, 
resultant of forces, work, energy, friction, velocity, mass and 
combinations, pulleys and mechanical advantage. 

CARPENTRY I. Care and use of tools, forms of joints em- 
ployed in making articles for the home and farm. Timber 
splices ; construction of modern farm gates, etc. Cutting of 
simple rafters and simple framing. 

BLACKSMITHING 1. Alternates with the class in Car- 
pentry I, and consists of the care of the forge fire, drawing 
upsetting, bending, swaging and the different forms of welding 
iron. A part of this work will consist of lectures covering the 
processes of the manufacture of iron and steel, with methods 
of hardening and tempering. 

ENGINE LECTURES. First term subject and consists of 
the study of the growth and development of steam and gas 



44 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

engines, types and efficiency; forms of governors; two and 
four cycle engines ; cooling and ignition systems ; lubrication. 
Laboratory study when necessary. 

FARM ACCOUNTING. A short course in bookkeeping, 
dealing especially with farm transactions. The shortest, most 
simple way of keeping accounts, the taking of inventories and 
the means of learning the exact state of the business receive 
special attention. 

BUSINESS PAPERS AND ENGLISH. In this course the 
proper forms of ordinary business papers will be studied with 
a view to ascertaining the rights of the parties to business 
transactions and the use and meaning of business forms. Some 
exercises in English writing will be given. 

FARM MECHANICS II. Hoists, transmission of power by 
belts, cables, chain, gears and shafting, hitches, rope splices, 
and lacing of belts. This course involves a great amount of 
applied mathematics and note book work. 

CARPENTRY II. A continuation of Carpentry I; construc- 
tion of door and window frames; cutting of hip and jack raft- 
ers ; inside finishing and cabinet work. 

BLACKSMITHING II. Alternates with Mechanical Draw- 
ing. A continuation of Blacksmithing I, in the making of 
punches, chisels, shaping and tempering machine tools, laying 
plow shares and practical horse shoeing. 

i 

MECHANICAL DRAWING. A brief practical course with 
special reference to the drafting of plans for farm apparatus 
and structures. Farm building plans and plans for the location 
of farm structures will receive attention. 

STEAM AND GAS ENGINES, BOILERS. Second term 
work, a continuation of Engine Lectures ; largely laboratory 
practice." Study in adjustment of working parts; use of indi- 
cator; brake and indicated tests; methods of boiler feed; effic- 
iency test of small steam plant. Opportunity will be given for 
the study of special problems. 

MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE. Alternates with advanced 
carpentry. The student will be given instruction in chipping and 
filing, with practice in shaping and setting machine tools, also 
practice in the manipulation of modern metal working machines. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 45 



HOME ECONOMICS 

This department aims to meet the needs of two classes of 
students : 

1. To fit graduates to teach Domestic Science and Domestic 
Art in the grades and High School. 

2. Special students or students of the regular courses who 
desire to secure training as a preparation for home life in its 
larger significance. 

COOKERY I. This course aims to give practice in cooking 
the more fundamental foods and in serving simple meals. Suf- 
ficient repetition of processes is given to secure a fair degree 
of manipulation of materials and utensils. 

It also includes a study of the food materials, growth, pro- 
duction, manufacture, adulteration, costs, composition, digesti- 
bility and nutritive value. 

COOKERY II. The second course in cookery provides ad- 
ditional practice in work with foods and emphasizes the pro- 
fessional aspect of the work. The student is trained not only 
to obtain good results in housekeeping and cookery, but also 
to think and work with the view of presenting the subject mat- 
ter to others. 

Emphasis is also placed on preservation of fruits and veget- 
ables, preparation of foods in season and in large quantities. 
They make a study of proper combinations of foods both from 
the nutritive and the aesthetic standpoint. A study is made 
of the principles and methods of serving both formal and in- 
formal meals most efficiently. Each student plans and executes 
a luncheon for six people for a special cost per plate. The 
marketing is done by the student and the caloric value must 
be carefully figured. 

Each student is required to plan, work up and present a dem- 
onstration lecture on some phase of cookery. 

This course also considers invalid cookery. Dishes are pre- 
pared for certain diseases, and dainty and attractive serving 
of invalid trays is fully considered. 

HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT. Under this course vari- 
ous topics are considered. It aims to give the students an in- 
sight into the complexities of the modern household, and to 
fit them to organize and successfully cope with the problems 
concerned with the administration of household affairs. 



46 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

The course begins with a brief survey of the evolution of 
the home and leads to the planning of a home for an approxi- 
mate amount to suit the needs of a given family, with especial 
attention given to saving the strength and time of the house- 
keeper. Special study is made of the plumbing, heating and 
lighting systems, also of the furnishing and decorating of the 
home to meet artistic, economic and sanitary requirements. It 
further considers the organization and management of the mod- 
ern household with its relation to economy and that in turn to 
efficiency. 

HOME NURSING. 

The design of this course is to give a practical knowledge 
for the general care of cases of illness in the home. It fur- 
nishes instruction in simple emergencies and accidents which 
may occur in the home or elsewhere. 

Practical work is supplemented wherever possible. A text 
book is used. 

NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY. This course emphasizes the 
physiology of nutrition. One course in physiology is a prere- 
quisite. It gives the 'student the scientific principles upon which 
to base his study of Dietetics. 

DIETETICS. Attention is given to the problems of human 
nutrition and their application to the feeding of the infant, the 
adolescent, the adult and the aged in both sickness and health. 
The working out of the energy value of the various food 
materials and the energy requirements of individuals living 
under specific conditions. 

SPECIAL METHODS. This course considers the profes- 
sional aspect of Home Economics. It aims to organize the 
practical information needed by a teacher in introducing or con- 
ducting the work. Methods of teaching are studied with ref- 
erence to the preparation and presentation of lessons, class and 
laboratory management. 

Careful consideration is given to the planning of courses of 
study and equipment for specific schools, and under varying 
conditions. 

HOME AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS. Considers such sub- 
jects as the organization and development of the primitive home, 
the origin and development of industries, woman in modern 
industry, woman in social service, the ethics of spending, the 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 47 

work of the Consumers League, the choice and consideration 
of sociological problems in which women should take great 
interest. 

SEWING I. The course includes hand sewing, drafting and 
garment making. 

Hand sewing, primary stitches, seams, plackets, and hems 
are developed on samplers and simple articles. 

Drafting. The tape and rule drafting system is used, all 
patterns for the first year's work are drafted. Garment mak- 
ing; a four pieced suit of underwear, a shirt waist and a plain 
cotton dress. The student is instructed in the care and use of 
the sewing machine. 

SEWING II. Dressmaking. Commercial patterns are intro- 
duced and drafted patterns continued with special attention to 
design. 

The problems are : a wool dress, a silk dress, and a dainty 
cotton dress. The following phases of dressmaking are brought 
out as the problems are developed : combination of materials, 
trimmings and suitability. Students fit each other. 

MILLINERY. Making and covering of buckram and wire 
forms ; making of folds, bows, flowers and ornaments ; the 
selection of materials as to quality, color, suitability and dura- 
bility and the renovation and use of old materials. 

TEXTILES. The study of textile fibers, their manufac- 
ture, a survey of textile products and the development of the 
textile industry. 

ART NEEDLE WORK. Instruction is given in the stitches 
of embroidery, crochet and tatting, and their application # to 
personal garments and household furnishings. 

BASKETRY. The designing and making of raffia and reed 
baskets and mats. 

HOME ECONOMICS SHORT COURSE 

This course affords an opportunity for girls who can attend 
only during the winter months, to secure a brief course in 
some of 4he most practical subjects of Domestic Economy. 

A girl upon completing the work outlined will be entitled 
to a certificate to that effect. 

ARITHMETIC. A practical course in the elements, factor- 
ing, decimals, practical measurements, percentage. Chief em- 
phasis will be laid upon problems pertaining to home and farm. 



48 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH. This course is intended to 
give the pupil a correct working knowledge of written and 
spoken English. For election to be made see the description of 
this course given under Farm Engineering. 

COOKERY. A study of the principles and practice of cook- 
ery. This course includes the preparation of all classes of foods 
— fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, salads, pastry, bread, cakes, 
etc., and the principles involved in each. Special attention is 
given to the planning and cost of meals and to table setting and 
serving. (Daily.) 

S. C. SEWING I. Garment making and the use of com- 
mercial patterns. 

Progress depends upon the individual, and the kind of work 
varies according to the ability of the pupil after the first three 
garments are completed. 

S. C. ART NEEDLEWORK. This course includes the mak- 
ing of the principal art needlework stitches and their applica- 
tion. 

S. C. SEWING II. Garment making continued with special 
attention given to the selection of material as to color, qual- 
ity, suitability and purpose; also fitting and finishing. 

S. C. TEXTILES. The purpose of this course is to give 
the student an intelligent basis for the selection and use of tex- 
tile materials for clothing and household furnishings, also a 
study of adulterants and simple means of detecting them. 

MATHEMATICS 

ARITHMETIC. A complete review of the essentials of 
arithmetic, including the fundamental processes, favoring, frac- 
tions, decimals, denominate numbers, longitude and time, prac- 
tical measurements and percentage, together with the best meth- 
ods of presenting these various subjects to pupils of the pub- 
lic schools. All abstract combinations are preceded, as far as 
possible, by constructive effort and the work made objective. 
In the more advanced units of study the subjects will be treat- 
ed as they occur in actual business transactions regardless of 
text book limits. 

ARITHMETIC. (SHORT COURSE.) Industrial Arith- 
metic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon problems pertaining 
to the farm. The work will involve fractions, decimals, de- 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 49 

nominate numbers, practical measurements and percentage. 
Problems dealing with such matters as the cost of buildings, 
marketing, measurements, insurance, taxes and banking will be 
taught in the most 'practical business-like fashion. Daily thru 
the Winter Term. 

ALGEBRA. ONE YEAR. All elementary algebra is cov- 
ered up to and including quadratic equations, especial emphasis 
being laid on the fundamental laws of algebra, their deriva- 
tion, and their relation to the solution of problems. The re- 
lation of algebra to arithmetic and to the higher branches of 
mathematics is constantly kept in mind and the practical uses 
of algebra noted. 

PLANE GEOMETRY. ONE YEAR. Geometry, inductive 
and deductive. The student is grounded in the fundamental 
principles of the subject. Methods of reasoning; the classi- 
fication of the various geometrical forms, lines, angles and sur- 
faces, and the various kinds of proofs. The relation of Geom- 
etry to Arithmetic. Especial emphasis on original and inventive 
work. The method of original demonstration thru analysis, 
construction and proof. Many problems in geometry as applied 
in engineering and surveying are presented. 

SOLID GEOMETRY. ONE-HALF YEAR. In order that 
the subject may be more easily comprehended, geometrical sol- 
ids are employed in the demonstration of each proposition, and 
the students are also required, from time to time, to fashion 
out of cardboard various solids for use in demonstrating prob- 
lems in construction. The application of geometry to science 
and industry receives much attention. i 

ALGEBRA II. O'NE-HALF YEAR. Quadratic equations 
are reviewed and completed. The following units of study are 
then taken up; problems and formulas of physics, the theory 
of proportion, progressions, and logarithms. 

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. ONE 
YEAR. The theoretical part of the subject is practically com- 
pleted at mid-year. Consideration of the surveying instruments, 
including chain and tape, compass, level, transit and planimeter. 
After spring opens practically all of the time is devoted to 
field work. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters in the basement 
of Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table 



EO NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

room and apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 20x25 
feet conveniently arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Car- 
negie Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and ap- 
paratus for twenty-four students working at one time. 

PHYSICS A. Seven hours a week for the year. This 
course consists of lectures, experiments and recitations. The 
experiments are simple, yet full and exhaustive. Especial at- 
tention is given to the solution of problems involving physical 
laws and formulae. A series of forty-eight experiments is pre- 
scribed and performed by students during the year and care- 
ful tabulations are made of the results. Especial attention is 
given to the fundamentals that lead up to the various courses in 
engineering. 

PHYSICS B. Seven hours a week for the year. Lectures 
will be given to cover the more advanced work in mechanics, 
the practical appliances on heat, light, and electricity and the 
more complex formulae for solving physical problems. Labor- 
atory work will be given, which has especial bearing on the 
topics studied and which will be of particular benefit to the 
student specializing in the Mechanic Arts. Prerequisite, 
Physics A. 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY. Seven hours a week for the 
year. Three periods a week are devoted to the study of the 
laws, theories, formulae and fundamental principles of chem- 
istry and to the solution of problems in chemical arithmetic. 
Two double periods each week are devoted to laboratory work. 
Over one hundred experiments involving chemical change, af- 
finity, valence, ^tc, are performed and noted so that the stu- 
dent both becomes familiar with the manipulation of apparatus 
and masters the laws governing phenomena. 

CHEMISTRY OF FOODS. Daily thruout the Fall term. 
Designed especially for young women who are pursuing domes- 
tic science courses. The essential materials in a complete food; 
the reactions that occur in their preparation and use; the com- 
mon adulterants ; the foods in which commonly found ; how 
recognized ; household tests, etc. Prerequisite. Physiology and 
Physics A. 

QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Daily for the first four and 
one-half months. Lecture once a week. Laboratory work four 
times a week. The course consists of a systematic study of 
the bases, and elements and radicals, and a method of analyzing 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 51 

an unknown substance of complex composition. Emphasis is 
placed on such methods as can be used in quantitative deter- 
minations. Prerequisites, General Chemistry,, and Elementary 
Qualitative Analysis. 

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five time a week for the 
last half of the year. Two and one-half months given to gravi- 
metric analysis and two months given to valumetric analysis. 
Some simple substances that illustrate the fundamentals of 
quantitative work, are taken up first. Then such as pig iron, 
steel, cement, soil, water for potable purposes, water for boiler 
purposes are analyzed. Prerequisites, General Chemistry, Quan- 
titative Analysis and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

BACTERIOLOGY. Five hours a week for the Spring term. 
Arranged to meet the needs of domestic science students. 
Recitations and experiments. The yeast plant is studied in all 
the important details of its life habits. Especial attention is 
given to the molds and bacteria of the household. The life 
habits of the bacilli, their relations to health and disease, the 
precautions that should be taken in preventing infection are 
dealt with extensively. 

GENERAL SCIENCE. An introductory course in the ele- 
mentary principles of both chemistry and physics, with some 
reference to related sciences. Many of the simpler phenomena 
of nature will be considered in recitation and in laboratory 
work. 

AGK1CULTUKE AND BIOLOGY 

AGRICULTURE A. For young women only. 

The object of this course is to give the young women a general 
training in agriculture and to supply them information which 
will be helpful in teaching agriculture in the rural and graded 
schools. 

The work is divided into three closely related parts : labora- 
tory work; recitations, lectures, and general discussions; and re- 
ports on special reading. An effort is made continually to as- 
sociate class work with the daily life of the farmer, thus making 
the course both interesting and of practical value. When pos- 
sible field trips are made giving the students an opportunity for 
first hand study of the subjects observed. During the spring 
special attention is given to gardening and live stock studies. 



52 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

AGRICULTURE B. For young men only. 

The previous experience of most of our young men has given 
them considerable information along agricultural lines, which, 
coupled with some scientific study of the subject, will fit them 
much better to meet the problems of the farm. It is the object 
of this course to supply this scientific training. Most of these 
students find they have many interesting problems they wish to 
work on, and receive much benefit from discussing them to- 
gether in class. 

The major part of the course deals with live stock, altho 
considerable work is done with grains, especially those related 
to live stock raising. Miany trips are made to study the different 
classes of live stock, from which study the students appear to 
get some valuable training. 

The work of the winter term is so planned that students in 
the special short course may enter the class. 

AGRICULTURE II. Advanced course open only to students 
who have completed Course I, or who may be otherwise spec- 
ially fitted for more advanced work. The aim is to give fur- 
ther preparation for teaching agriculture, as well as to fit 
them better for farm practice. This course allows consider- 
able special study along the lines treated, and for this reason 
is of especial value. Students may elect to do considerable 
independent work which is of much greater value than any 
other. 

AGRICULTURE, SUMMER SCHOOL. Given only in the 
summer term. This course aims to cover the -field of agricul- 
ture in a general way that will help the rural teacher in pre- 
senting it to farmer boys and girls. It consists of text book 
study supplemented with outside reading, lectures and labora- 
tory work. The exercises and experiments done in the labora- 
tory are only those that can be done in any rural school room. 
The course is divided about as the regular school year, so the 
teacher may work up an outline for the whole year's work from 
that done in summer. 

AGRICULTURE, SHORT COURSE. Given during the 
winter term to accommodate young men from the farms who 
can be in school but a few months during the winter. Specal 
phases of agriculture are studied in laboratory and class reci- 
tation. Two days a week are spent in laboratory work, two 
in text recitation, and one in discussing current farm topics in 
farm papers. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 53 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
school, have been reserved for a demonstration farm. One 
section has been fenced for cultivation. This area has been 
devoted to school gardens, corn and alfalfa. Last year more 
land was broken, and this will be planted to alfalfa. The gar- 
dens have been relocated nearer the buildings, so the land for- 
merly used for this purpose can be used for the general farm 
crops. Some very valuable results have been obtained from 
the farm. A barn has been added to the equipment, with live 
stock to still further promote the practical side of school agri- 
culture. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. Offered in the fall term 
of the second year, and required in most all courses. Most of 
the time is spent in the study and discussion of the text. Some 
time is spent in microscopic study of parts of the body, and 
in conducting practical experiments which aim to bring out 
obscure points. Especial emphasis is placed on hygiene. 

BOTANY. Offered during the winter and spring terms. It 
is required of all students in the normal and home economic 
courses. Most of the time is spent with the higher plants that 
are of most economic importance. A short time may be spent 
in studying the lower non-vascular forms from the evolution- 
ary standpoint. Especial emphasis is placed on the relation 
of botany to everyday life, which will teach the student to 
appreciate the importance of plants. During the last of the 
spring most of the flowers then in bloom are classified, and 
a small herbarium may be made. 

ENGLISH 

The work in English covers four years, three years' work 
being required for graduation. Special attention is given in 
all classes to the student's spoken and written language. 

GRAMMAR. A thoro study of theoretical and applied gram- 
mar with constant written and oral exercises and drills in the 
use of correct forms of speech, with special attention to com- 
mon errors. Elementary composition. 

For the English of the Farm Engineering and Short Course 
in Home Economics see the description under these courses. 

ENGLISH I. Fall term. The Study of Literature. 
The class will study : Macauley, Horatius at the Bridge, Haw- 
thorne's Great Stone Face, Ambitious Guest, Great Carbuncle: 



54 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Dickens' Christmas Carol; Hale's Man Without a Country; 
Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Lincoln's Gettysburg Ad- 
dress; Hubbard's Message to Garcia; Longfellow's Courtship 
of Miles Standish ; Whittier's Snow Bound. 

Winter Term. Grammar based upon Pearson and Kirchway's 
Essentials of English. 

Spring Term. The study of grammar and practical 
rhetoric. The points in grammar that need emphasizing will 
receive attention with a drill on these points as needed. Let- 
ter writing is taught with attention to practical creative work. 
Oral composition and more formal written work on themes 
in description and narrative will be a part of the course. 

For outside reading thruout the year : Four books, one from 
Scott or Tennyson, and three from a large number of optional 
books designated by the teacher. 

ENGLISH II. First half-year. Practical Rhetoric and Com- 
position. 

This is a continuation of the second part of the first year, 
bringing in simple exposition. The planning of a composition 
and its paragraphing will be considered with several short 
themes to be criticized and deficiencies or weaknesses remedied. 

Second half-year: The Study of Literature. 

(a) The Drama, with two of Shakespeare's great master- 
pieces studied quite critically. These will be : Julius Caesar, 
King Lear, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Midsummer Night's 
Dream, as selected by the teacher and class. Either As You 
Like It, or Henry V, or The Tempest will be read, also two 
from Sheridan's Rivals, Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, or 
Kennedy's Servant in the House will be read. Good oral read- 
ing will receive attention and some of the great passages com- 
mitted to memory. 

(b) The Novel — a critxal study of Eliot's Silas Marner, 
and the outside reading and class criticism of another of the 
great standard novels. 

(c) The Short Story — a critical study of several short 
stories from the great treasury of modern writers ; a review 
of some of the standard short stories with a more careful 
study of some characteristic short stories. Also outside read- 
ing of nine stories from English and American authors. 

ENGLISH III. First half-year: Study of Literature (Con- 
tinued.) 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 55 

(a) Poetry, Narrative, Epic and Lyric. Four from the 
following : Sohrab and Rustum, Rime of the Ancient Mariner, 
Minor Poems or Paradise Lost I-III, Rape of the Lock, Lay 
of the Last Minstrel, Idylls of the King. 

The study and reading of several ballads and lyrics with 
memorizing of the briefer gems of the author studied. The study 
of some standard periodical by the class. 

(b) The Oration. A study of selections from the orations 
of Lincoln, Washington, Webster and Burke, with two others 
read. 

Second Half-year : Study of Rhetoric and Composition. 

Classroom debating and the writing of several themes will 
form a part of this course. Argumentative themes and the 
best and most forcible manner of expression will be consid- 
ered. Written reviews are required of assigned books. Orations 
are written and given by all students. 

ENGLISH IV. (a) History of American Literature. 

(b) Topical reports based on material in the library sup- 
plemented by text books. Readings from American Literature, 
Calhoun & McAlarney. 

Written reviews are required of assigned books — orations are 
written and given by all students. 

(c) Masterpieces for study: Bryant's Thanatopsis, To a 
Water-Fowl, A Forest Hymn, The Flood of Years, The Green 
Mountain Boys, The Yellow Violet, To a Fringed Gentian; 
Emerson's Compensation, Self-Reliance; Lincoln's First and 
Second Inaugural Address, Gettysburg Speech, The Emanci- 
pation Proclamation ; Poe's Poems ; Taylor's Lars ; Webster's 
First Bunker Hill Oration; Whittier's Slavery Poems and 
Snowbound. 

For reading: Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanac; Haw- 
thorne's House of Seven Gables ; Parkman's La Salle ; Thor- 
eau's The Succession of Forest Trees, The Apples, Sounds : 
Warner's My Summer in a Garden, and others as selected. 

LATIN 

LATIN I. The elements. Daily thruout the year. Careful 
study and practice in pronunciation, a mastery of inflections 
and syntax, a gaining of a working vocabulary. Translating 
of simple prose. Much time and emphasis is placed upon the 
translation of English into Latin. Word formation also re- 
ceives considerable attention. 



56 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

LATIN II. Caesar. Four books ; translation into clear 
idiomatic English; the life of Caesar; facts regarding the Ro- 
man government and the organization of the Roman army 
necessary to a clear understanding of the text ; comparative 
study of Latin constructions and their English equivalents, 
with a view to obtaining a clearer understanding of the exact 
structure of the English sentence. 

LATIN III. Cicero. Six orations; four In Catilinam ; Pro 
Archia ; and De Imperio Pompei, or Pro Marcello ; the life of 
Cicero; the Roman government in Cicero's time; the historical 
allusions in the text; Latin constructions and the light they 
throw on English grammar. 

LATIN IV. Vergil. Six books of the Aeneid; syntax; 
grammatical peculiarities ; occasional metrical translation ; the 
life of Vergil; the history of his times; the mythology of the 
Aeneid; the versification of the Aeneid. 

GERMAN 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN. For beginners, special atten- 
tion is given to correct pronunciation, the principles of gram- 
mar, the conversion of simple prose from German into English 
and from English into German, and to conversation exercises. 

GERMAN READING. Review of the grammar; practice 
in translating from German into idiomatic English ; written 
exercises based on a text and Harris' Composition ,and Joynes- 
Meissner's Grammar; Hans Anderson's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, 
Storm's Immensee, Gerstaecker's Germelshausen, Dillard's Aus 
dem Deutchen Dichterwald, Heyse's L'Arrabiata, Benedix's Die 
Hochzeitsreise, Schiller's Der Neffe als Onkel, etc. 

CLASSIC GERMAN. Joynes-Meissners Grammar, Suder- 
man's Johannes; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; Goethe's Eg- 
mont; Freytag's Die Journalisten ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, etc. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

THE FOUR YEAR COMMERCIAL ACADEMIC COURSE. 

The course is open to those who have completed the eighth 
grade and wish to become quite proficient in the commercial 
work and at the same time secure a fairly complete secondary 
course. Graduates from this course will be given a regular 
diploma. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 57 

The main purpose of this course is not to turn out book- 
keepers and stenographers, however, they will be well quali- 
fied for the work of such a position, but to give them some 
of the very underlying principles of good business and at the 
same time furnish them with a good foundation for more ad- 
vanced commercial work, if desired. 

Students wishing to teach the commercial work may do so 
by taking some additional normal work, upon the completion 
of which, they will be given a teacher's certificate. 

THE TWO YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Owing to the fact that many students do not feel that they 
have the time or the money to take a four year course, and yet 
wish to become fairly proficient in the strictly commercial work, 
we have compiled the two year commercial course. This makes 
a very attractive course for those who have finished some of 
the other courses, but do not wish to teach or go to college. 

Students coming from the eighth grade will find it almost 
impossible to complete the course in two years, if both book- 
keeping and shorthand are taken up. It is possible to have con- 
cessions made in this course. Completion of the course by a 
student will be acknowledged by the granting of a special cer- 
tificate of completion. 

Description of the work in the Commercial Department : 

BOOKKEEPING I. First term's work consists of the 
handling of ledger accounts, the journal and journal exercises, 
and the cash book. Second term's work consists of set one 
of the "20th Century" system. Third terms work is the "20th 
Century" Commission set. 

Bookkeeping is counted as a full elective in all courses. Those 
who take this course should be well prepared in arithmetic. 

BOOKKEEPING II. Open to those who are qualified to 
handle the work. First term's work is the second set of the 
"20th Century" system. Second term's work is "William and 
Rogers" banking set. Third terms work is left largely to the 
wishes of the students and the judgment of the teacher in 
charge. 

Two periods per day of school work and outside work as 
required to accomplish the work. 

STENOGRAPHY I. First ten lessons in the Gregg Man- 
ual along with penmanship exercises, make up the work for 



58 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

the first term. Completing the Manual and easy dictation exer- 
cises make up the second term's work. Dictation from the 
Gregg Speed Practice is taken up in the third term. 

STENOGRAPHY II. Continuation of the Gregg Speed 
Practice together with some easy dictation which review the 
principles of the system make up the work of the first term. 
Completion of the Gregg Speed Practice text, dictation from 
books, periodicals and speeches will constitute the work of the 
second term. 

Office practice and dictation of all kinds of subject matter 
will be the work of the third term. 

TYPEWRITING I. The first twenty-four lessons in Fritz- 

Eldridge text in typewriting constitute the first year's work. 

Open to all students and elective in all courses if the entire 

year's work is taken. Two periods per week of school work. 

TYPEWRITING II. Completion of the tritz-Eldridge text, 
dictation, transcribing of shorthand notes, stenciling, mimeo- 
graphing and office practice constitute the work of the second 
year. 

BUSINESS ENGLISH. A very brief review of the parts of 
speech, correction of grammatical errors and proper usage of 
adjectives and adverbs, letter writing and business correspond- 
ence. Must be preceded by a fair knowledge of English gram- 



COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC. Van Tuyl's Complete 
Business Arithmetic is used. The work covers papering, car- 
peting and plastering of rooms, review of the principles of per- 
centage, profit and loss, trade discount, bank discount, true dis- 
count, cash discount and interest. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. A text is used. This work takes 
up Contracts, Bailment, Negotiable Instruments, Insurance, 
Partnership, and Corporations. This subject is a very practical 
one, as it takes up and treats very nicely many of the rudiments 
of common law. Advisable for all students, who are capable, 
to take as an elective. 

COMMERCIAL RAW MATERIALS. The substances are 
traced from their sources in the animal, vegetable, or mineral 
kingdom thru the various processes of preparation to their fina 
uses. The things which are of greatest commercial importance 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 59 

are treated in greatest detail, such articles as cotton, sugar, 
woods, rubber, silk, iron and coal being described at a consid- 
erable length. Toothaker's Commercial Raw Materials is used. 

ECONOMIC HISTORY. A general survey of the commer- 
cial development of the world from the earliest times to the 
present. Webster's General History of Commerce is used. 

PENMANSHIP AND SPELLING. One period a day of 
school work. Half the time being alloted to spelling and the 
other half to penmanship. The free arm movement in penman- 
ship is striven for and a reasonable degree of skill is required 
to graduate from the Commercial Courses. 

HISTORY AND CIYICS 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. This course includes a 
thoro review of the history of the United States and is intend- 
ed for students entering the Two Year Elementary Course or 
need further preparation in history. 

CIVICS. This study is intended to acquaint the student with 
the machinery of our government both local and national, and 
thus prepare him to perform his part intelligently as a citizen 
of our country. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. A careful study of the Ancient 
Oriental Civilization in Western Asia and in Egypt. The his- 
tory of Greece and Rome is comprised in this course. Stress 
is placed on the origin and growth of the institutions of civi- 
lization and the student is led to discover what essential ele- 
ments these nations contributed to modern life. 

MODERN HISTORY. The period covered by this course 
extends from the coming of Charlemagne, 800 A. D., to the 
present time. Special attention is given to the rise of the vari- 
ous powers of Europe, to the influences that shaped them, and 
the relation they bear to the history of our country. 

AMERICAN HISTORY. In this advanced course of his- 
tory the student is led to see that the achievements in political, 
industrial, social and educational fields were gained by human 
activities rightly directed and that the responsibility of their 
maintenance in part rests on him, also to realize the importance 
of our relation with world nations. Information from sources 
other than the text book is required. Students entering this 
course must have had Ancient History or Modern History and 
United States History. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



POLITICAL SCIENCE. A comprehensive study is here 
presented of the study of the constitutional history of the United 
States from its beginning to the present time. It includes a 
study of the growth of our national government and the gov- 
ernment of the township, county, city and state, and the -rela- 
tion between the various forms. A brief study of Ancient and 
Modern governments is taken up to enable the student to under- 
stand the beginnings and fundamentals of government and 
governmental institutions. 

DRAWING AND FINE ARTS 

The department offers thoro instruction in fine and decor- 
ative arts. The Fine Art Studio is located on the third floor 
of Carnegie Hall, and there is ample equipment of casts and 
studio furnishings. The department aims to give thoro in- 
struction in the principles of drawing and painting; to enlarge 
the student's acquaintance with what is best in art; to offer 
courses of instruction adapted to the needs of teachers in the 
public schools and supervisors of art instruction in city schools. 
With serious study a high degree of effiiency and technical 
knowledge may be attained here at much less expense than 
would be incurred for similar instruction in a large city. 

Not "art for art's sake," but art for the enrichment of life 
is the conception held here. Artistic taste and appreciation of 
the beautiful are needed in the humblest and busiest life. 
Especial emphasis is placed upon the application of the prin- 
ciples of fine arts to the environment of the every day life. 

FINE ARTS. A general course in appreciation and com- 
bining the essentials in drawing, painting and composition. A 
study of form, using different media — Charcoal, pencil, water 
color and oil. Still life and flower painting in water color. 
Study of composition by using flowers and landscapes. Figure 
sketching, advanced composition and illustration in charcoal, 
water color and china painting. 

NORMAL PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING. The work of 
this course is planned with special reference to the teaching 
of drawing and hand work in the public schools. One period 
daily for three terms is required for the completion of the 
work. With public school music this course forms a full nor- 
mal credit. 

Term A. Primary Grades. The work consists of paper 
folding, tearing and cutting, story telling by means of colorec 
paper and crayola, color study with simple color charts, th( 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 61 

study and representation of simple well known forms, silhou- 
ettes of animals, simple figures and landscape work, representa- 
tion of flowers and birds with crayolas and water color, paper 
construction, weaving, raffia wrapping, braiding and knotting. 

Term B. Intermediate Grades. Study of form by use of 
charcoal, pencil and color. Special study of the cube, sphere 
and cylinder, and similar shapes ; color theory ; hue, intensity 
and textile values, chart of complementary colors, and relation 
of these colors. Simple design problems, illustrating the use 
of the elements and principles of design. Landscapes in black 
and white, and colored representations of autumn, winter and 
spring. Silhouettes of casts of animals. Scales of tone values. 
Figure sketching and illustrating. Paper construction, reed mats 
and baskets. 

Term C. Grammar Grades. Some of the same problems are 
worked out, but the work is more technical. Principles of de- 
sign and perspective are considered. Designs are made and 
applied to sewed basketry. Still life studies are worked out 
in color and charcoal. Special study "of birds during the spring 
term. Study of masterpieces from reproductions. Methods of 
teaching drawing and general outline for the grades. 

METAL WORK. The problems given are considered in 
relation to each other in order to develop a general knowl- 
edge of sheet metal work. Processes include forming, sawing, 
filing and building by hard and soft soldering, riveting, etc., 
together with a study of the processes or repousee, etching 
and coloring. 

POTTERY. The course begins with the building of hand- 
made pieces of different sizes and shapes ; the making of tiles 
together with decoration by relief and incised lines ; building 
of pilaster models; casting of moulds and pouring and fin- 
ishing of mould-made pieces. Students glaze and fire a part of 
their work. 

HANDICRAFTS. In addition to the courses in metal work 
and pottery, students are offered work in the following crafts : 
Bookbinding, cut and tooled leather work, advanced construc- 
tion with tilo matting, raffia and reeds, stenciling and block 
painting. 

CHINA PAINTING. Special work in china-painting is of- 
fered by the Fine Arts Department. This includes the study 
of appropriate design for china, the mixing and application of 



62 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

color, and the consideration of the various processes involved 
in keramic art. 



MUSIC 

The music department of the State Normal and Industrial 
School comprises instruction in piano, voice, chorus work, har- 
mony, history of music, music theory and science of music. 
Special efforts are made to make clear to the students the im- 
portance of technical work and the study of touch, accentua- 
tion and tone coloring. This leads to an understanding of 
what it means to interpret music and a thoro conception of the 
art of expression and artistic execution. The main purpose of 
piano music is to enable the student to understand what music 
is ; help him understand that music, like all other art, must 
touch the soul of man, or interpret the soul of man — and be 
an expression of charactetr, personality and individuality. 

The ability to think music and hear musically and to study in- 
telligently will be insisted upon as a prime requisite of suc- 
cess. Especial care and thought will be brot to bear upon the 
problems of memorization. 

One lesson and at least one and one-half hours practice daily 
per week for a year makes one credit. 



SPECIAL PIANO COURSE 

Assuming no knowledge of the instrument whatever, from 

two to three years' study is needed by students of average 

ab'lity before they are ready to take up the regular Special 
Music Course. 

The following outlines are suggestive of the work done. The 
studies given will be such as most fully meet the needs of the 
pupil. 

Preparatory course in hand culture which is based on prin- 
ciples taught by Leschetizky; Major scales. Damm's School 
for Beginners. Pieces by modern composers. 

First year: Hand Culture continued; exercises for increas- 
ing velocity, Czerny, 101 Progressive Studies. Modern Sona- 
tinas. Selected pieces from Reinecke, Schuman's Album for 
the Young, Schmoll, Duvernoy, Streabbog, Tschaikowsky. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 63 

Second, Junior and Senior Years correspond to the First, 
Second and Third Years in Piano as given in the Special Mu- 
sic Course. 

Three Year Piano Course 

First Year Second Year Third Year 

Piano Piano Piano 

Harmony. 3-5 Harmony. 3-5 Ensemble Playing 

Mus. Appre., 1-5 Mus. Appre., 1-5 Nor. Piano Meth- 

Mus. History, l-o Mus. History, 1-5 Psychology 

German Voice English III 

English I English II 

First Year Piano: Scales, arpeggios, chords and octaves. Sona- 
tinas of Clementi, Kuhlau, Mozart, and Schytte, Haydn. Ac- 
curate memorization and playing of such as "Little Preludes, 
Fugus," Bach. Selected works of Beethoven, Schuman, Grieg 
and others. 

Second Year Piano : Development of technic by addition of 
thirds, sixths and complicated rhythms. 

Studies of Czerny, Hanson and Kuhlau. 

Sonatas of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert. 

Free selections by Mendelssohn, Schubert, Schuman, Grieg, 
Chopin, and modern composers. 

Third Year Piano : Applied Technic Preludes and fugues from 
"Well Tempered Clavichord," Bach, also some of same com- 
posers Suite. Sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven. Selections, 
Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Schuett, D'Albert MacDowell, Rach- 
maninoff and Reger. 

Harmony is to theory what grammar is to a language. Scales, 
intervals, formation of triads and septchards, inversions and 
cadences. Sequences in the key. Staff work based mostly on 
figured bass. Chord progressions and modulation. Advanced 
work, based upon Chadwick and Foote and Spaldings' "Modern 
Harmony." 

History of Music. A general survey. Early canons and 
folk-songs. Drill in pronunciation of names. Development 
of orchestra and instrumental forms. Piano music of Weber, 
Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schuman, Liszt and Wagner. 

Instrumental Ensemble. Four-hand piano arrangements of 
overtures and symphonies for purposes of sight-reading and 
rhythmic feeling, also accompanying voice. 



64 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Normal and Public School Music. All pupils in this depart- 
ment are required to do a certain amount of Practice Teach- 
ing, either in class or with individual pupils. 

Each study listed is to be pursued thru the entire school 
year unless otherwise indicated. 

SPECIAL VOICE COURSE 

It is aimed to secure in the Vocal Department of the school 
courses of study which will fulfill the demands of every class 
of students, amateur or professional, singer or teacher. The 
course of instruction is based primarily upon the Italian school 
for training the voice. Correct placement so that the pupil 
produces tones thruout all registers with ease and with a firm, 
even quality, is the foundation of good singing. During the 
first year particular attention is paid to a systematic course of 
breathing, tone placements, and a careful analysis of vowels 
and consonants in relation to vocal needs. 

The songs of Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, McDowell, Par- 
ker, Chadwick, Foote ; operas of Mozart, Verdi, Donizetti ; and 
oratorios of Hadyn, Handel and Mendelssohn are studied. 

Students are given opportunities to appear publicly, thus 
fitting them for concert and. church work. 

Ear Training. Melodies and rhythmic dictation within the 
key. Triads in all forms. Identifications of same in key-re- 
lation to the major and minor modes. Chromatic tones. 

Each study listed is to be pursued thru the entire school year 
unless otherwise indicated. 

Three Year Voice Course 

First Year Second Year Third Year 

Voice Voice Voice 

Piano Piano No. P. S. Mus. 1-2 

M<us. History 1-5 Sight Singing 1-5 Psychology 

Ear Training 1-5 Mus. Appreciation German 

Harmony 3-5 German English III 

English I English II 

First Year in Voice : Correct breathing, correct singing of 
vowels, tone production, perfect enunciation and diction. Lutgen,- 
Studies, in elociety Vol 1. Songs of English and American 
composers. 

Second years : Lutgent Vol II, Oratorios', Church Music, 
German and French songs. 

Third year: French, German and Italian arias. Songs of 
Schubert, Schumann, Chadwick and Strauss are studied. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 65 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

Notation Ear-training Sight Singing 

Musical History Rote Songs 

Chorus and Conducting Methods 

Notation. Practice in accurate and rapid blackboard work 
in the writing of musical signs and knowledge of their use. 

Ear Training. Preliminary exercises to quicken the musical 
hearing. The vocal and written production of melodies in 
major and minor modes. The recognition through the ear of 
the chords of the fundamental harmonies. 

Sight Singing. Class and individual drill in singing at sight, 
without accompaniment, melodies of simple harmonic contents 
in all keys, major and minor. 

Rote Songs. The study and interpretation of song material 
suited to various grades of school. How to select, to teach, 
and to use them. 

Methods. In this class, fundamental teaching principles are 
presented and the problems in music, under the head of rhythm, 
melody, and harmony are classified according to grades from 
primary through the high school. These problems are pre- 
sented and taught in class by the teacher in charge, the les- 
son discussed and outlined, then given back to the class by its 
individual members. 

Conducting and Chorus. The study of the art of conduct- 
ing, leading to an intelligent use of the baton, chorus practice 
which each member of the class is taught to direct. 

History of Music. This subject is given throughout the year, 
dealing with the development of music in all its forms from 
primitive times to the present, with the history of musical 
taste and culture in all countries. 

Choral Singing. Daily chorus practice for a brief period is 
given the entire school. This class is made up of the entire 
body of students and attendance is compulsory. Constant prac- 
tice is had on such compositions as lie within the range and 
understanding of the pupils. A glee club is organized and 
given systematic drill. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

By an act of the Legislature the State Normal and Industrial 
School is required to give theoretical and practical instruction 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



in Military Science, and the company organized and drilled is 
subject to regular inspection by the Adjutant General of the 
State. In harmony with this provision young men are drilled 
regularly in the schools of the soldier, squad, platoon, com- 
pany, battalion and the ceremonies. 

(1) ORGANIZATION. The cadet battalion at present 
comprises, with the commandant, one cadet captain, one cadet 
first lieutenant, one cadet second lieutenant, five sergeants, one 
color sergeant, six corporals, and one artificer and cadets. A 
permanent company is maintained under the name of Com- 
pany A. A company is sometimes organized during the second 
term, composed principally of short course students. This is 
known as Company B. 

(2) EQUIPMENT. The State Normal and Industrial 
School is supplied with U. S. Remington rifles and accoutre- 
ments; a Winchester rifle for long range practice, Winder 
target rifles; a large Atkins disappearing target; United States 
regulation rapiers, for fencing; sabers and belts for cadet of- 
ficers ; silk battalion flag, United States regulation ammuni- 
tion, consisting of cartridges for target practice, and blank 
cartridges for use in volley firing and skirmish drill. Appli- 
cation has been made to the Adjutant General, U. S. A., for 
the detail of a regular army officer and the issuance of modern 
arms and equipment. 

(3) APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS. The offic- 
ers and non-commissioned officers are selected from among 
those cadets which have been most studious, soldier-like and 
faithful in the performance of their duties, and who have been 
most exemplary in their deportment. The commandant and 
the commissioned officers constitute the board of examiners for 
the appointment and promotion of privates and non-commis- 
sioned officers. 

(4) MILITARY DIPLOMA. Commissions and warrants 
are issued to the commissioned officers who are duly examined 
and deemed worthy of promotion, provided, however, that 
they have drilled at least one term as officers, have been pro- 
moted to higher rank, have received an average of not less 
than 75 per cent, and have participated in at least one annual 
military contest. A form of discharge will also be issued to 
non-commissioned officers and cadets who have satisfactorily 
completed the prescribed drill. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 67 

(5) UNIFORM. A uniform of prescribed pattern is worn 
by all cadets. This is compulsory for all students enrolled in 
courses requiring attendance for more than a single term. This 
uniform consists of blouse, trousers and cap of cadet gray 
color, modeled after the United States Military Academy uni- 
form. The price varies from $11.00 to $15.00. The uniform 
is tailor made, of strong material, and is as neat, durable and 
economical a suit as the student can obtain for this amount. 
It may be purchased at the school, at actual cost, or else- 
where, as the student elects. Uniforms are worn at all regular 
drills and inspections. 

(6) ATTENDANCE. Six terms of military drill are re- 
quired of all boys, unless excused on account of physical dis- 
ability. A physician's certificate must accompany such excuse. 
The standing of each cadet is averaged at the close of each 
term. The chief items considered in determining the grade are 
attendance, deportment and drill. Only those cadets whose 
average is above 75 per cent for the six terms will be exempt 
from attendance. 

(7) ANNUAL MILITARY CONTEST AND PRIZES. 
An annual military contest is held at the close of the Winter 
Term. There are three events : Company Drill and Inspec- 
tion; Squad Drill; Individual Contest Drill. For each drill 
at the annual military contest there are three judges selected 
by the President and Commandant. The squad receiving the 
hignest percentage in contest drill is presented with a silk rib- 
bon, suitably inscribed, to be attached to the battalion col- 
ors, and the members of the squad receive honorable mention 
in the catalog. The squad receiving second mark is given hon- 
orable mention in the catalog also. The prize for the best 
drilled man in the individual contest is a silver medal and for 
second a bronze medal. 

The members of the prize squad are also given honorable 
mention in the catalog. 

The individual contest is open to all cadets and non-com- 
missioned officers of the battalion. All cadets who, take part 
in the annual military contest must appear in full regulation 
uniform. 

In the 1917 contest there were two medals awarded in the 
Individual Contest, as follows: 

First Prize, Co. A., a silver medal — Corporal Emil Bjur. 

Second Prize, Co. A., a bronze medal — Sergeant Maro Jahr. 

In the squad contest the winners were as follows : 



OS NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

First Place — Squad II of Co. A. 

Second Place — Squal III of Co. A. 

Squad II was composed of the following: Second Lieutenant 
Ceryl Black (Commanding), and cadets William Hedlund. 
George Kabrud, Theo. Northrop, Paul Putnam, Walter Quam, 
Leslie Johnson, Leonard Reager, and Walter Moore. 

'Squad III was composed of the following: First Sergeant 
Herbert Pease, Sergeant Lee Wickersham, Corp. Frank Davis 
and cadets Wesley Brown, Allen Murray, Emil Dethlefsen, Ray 
Mueller, Leslie Casbon and Lewis Williams. 

The prize squad was composed of: Captain Stanley Fleming 
(Commanding), Sergeant Maro Jahr, Corporal Emil Bjur, 
Corporal Earl Ward, Corporal Victor Young and Cadets Edward 
Haskins, Cecil Snow, Harley Ferree, Clair Willis. 

The officers of Co. A. for the year 1916-1917 were : 

Commandant Louis P. Cook 

Captain Stanley J. Fleming 

First Lieutenant Preston Coleman 

Second Lieutenant Ceryl Black 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The primary purpose of the State Normal and Industrial 
School is the harmonious development of the entire boy or girl. 
Athletics and sports have a place in the development of every 
normal person and receive proper encouragement and super- 
vision. Physical training is compulsory; two periods per week 
for six terms. A physical examination is given each student 
taking gymnasium work and his greatest needs are determined 
by the use of cards and charts. These cards are kept on file, 
for reference, so that his improvement may be noted and weak- 
nesses corrected. Each student must procure a gymnasium 
suit of prescribed pattern and gymnasium shoes. 
Physical Training. 

(a) FOR YOUNG MEN. Two periods per week of six 
terms ; 6 points credit. 

Regular, systematic exercises in all forms of light gymnas- 
tics, both with and without apparatus ; free-hand exercises ; 
sports. Football, basketball, baseball and tennis are available 
in season. 

Gymnasium classes will be held in the afternoon at the 7th 
and 8th periods. All those desiring or who are required to 
take the work are requested to arrange to take it at one of 
these periods. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



(b) FOR YOUNG WOMEN. All girls enrolled in the 
regular work of the school are required to take some form of 
Physical Training. Those who are not able to take regular 
gymnasium work are given individual corrective work. After 
the first two years the course may be elected. 

I. 20 minutes, 4 times a week. Marching, gymnastics, cor- 
rective exercises, light apparatus, running, games, breathing ex- 
ercises and folk dancing. Required of all first year students. 

IT. 20 minutes, 4 times a week. Similar to course I. Re- 
quired of all second year students. 

III. 30 minutes 3 times a week. Athletics, Swedish gymnas- 
tics, heavy apparatus, Indian clubs, and folk dancing. Open to 
all students who have completed Courses I and II. 

IV. 30 minutes, 3 times a week. Physical Training Methods, 
Public School and Playground Work. Lectures in the Phy- 
siology, Anatomy, Dietetics and Hygiene of Exercise. Practice 
teaching and original work. Open to all students who have 
completed Curses I and II. High School graduates may elect 
this instead of Course II. 

Walking, tennis, hiking and similar work may be substituted 
when necessary for the last two courses. 

All students receive a thoro physical examination upon enter- 
ing and are given work adapted to their particular needs. 

All courses include instruction in the laws of health. 

ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL TRAINING. Especially 
designed for students expecting to teach, and coach, athletics. 
Anatomy, physiology and hygiene will be taken up so as to 
give the student a practical working basis for the course and 
show the necessity and benefits of physical training. The 
fundamental principles of the different branches of athletics 
tvill be considered ; selection, training and conditioning of ath- 
letes; problems of temperament, climate, weather and travel- 
ing. Lectures, charts, demonstrations and notebook work once 
a week throughout the year. 

Each student will be required to do a certain amount of prac- 
tice teaching and original work. 



70 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



List of Students 

SENIOR CLASS 

Normal Manual Training Course 

Leslie C. Casbon Valparaiso, Indiana 

H. Preston Coleman Ellendale 

Stanley J. Fleming Ellendale 

Fred G. Leasure Solomon, Kansas 

Ira S. Morgans Frederick, S. Dak. 

Fritz B. Pederson Ashley 

Rehberg, Paul Ellendale 

Fred Walz ... Ashley 

Normal Home Economics Course 

Gladys M. Dawe Fullerton 

Nettie Norris Anoka, Minn. 

Normal Course 

Fern Hazel Crandall Ellendale 

Gladys Grayce Graham Ellendale 

Anna M. Hermansen Ellendale 

Agnes O. Johansen Ellendale 

Elizabeth I. McConville Forbes 

Aida D. Miller Ellendale 

Ada Peterson Rutland 

H. Mary Thoreson Kulm 

Anna Tschetter Ashley 

Hillia M. Wattula Ludden 

Helen A. Wentzel Ellendale 

Ernest G. Wood Forbes 

Mechanic Arts Course 

Clellan Bentley Jordan, Montana 

Llewellyn Lynde Ellendale 

Academic Course 

Ceryl E. Black Ellendale 

Helen M. Coleman Ellendale 

Faye A. Hall Monango 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 71 

Hervey J. Hill Ellendale 

Orrin Lynde Ellendale 

Jennie Nelson Ellendale 

LeRoy Pease Stirum 

Charles Smith Ellendale 

Donna M. Welcher Ellendale 

Lewis Williams Ellendale 

Harold Zieman Oakes 

Commercial Academic Course 

Ackerman. Fred Wishek 

Clayton D. Geer Ellendale 

Thomas A. Lee Cayuga 

Agnes J. Quam Rhame 

JUNIORS 

Anderson, Hazel Ellendale 

Ashley, Jay Brampton 

Bium^r, Charles ...Ellendale 

Bohling, Sarah Ellendale 

Bowerman, Mae Fullerton 

Callan, Emily Ellendale 

Coleman, Bessie Ellendale 

DeLaHunt, Ruth Willmar Minn. 

Gould, Mabel Oakdale 

Ha wkinson, Ruth Parkers Prairie, Minn. 

Hollan, Daisy Kulm 

Johnson, Leslie Fullerton 

Joyner, Albert Ellendale 

Knox, Ethel Monango 

McCulley, Mabel Linton 

McMillan, Beulah Manson, Iowa 

Nelson, Esther Fullerton 

Noess, Anna Ellendale 

Olson, Odina Buxton 

Payton, Bessie Oakes 

Peterson, Beulah Dale 

Porter, Jacob Ellendale 

Sfaepard, Alice Ellendale 

Wattles, Grayce Ellendale 

Third Year Students 

Homedew, Lillian .' Ellendale 

Hulstrand, Andrew Fairdale 



72 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Kieffer, Helen Dale 

MIcGinnis, Lucille Silverleaf 

Macfarlane, Katherine Sauk Centre, Minn. 

Shryoek, Dorothea Wessington Springs S. Dak 

Stine, Alpha Lidgerwood 

Thompson, Arthur Fairdale 

Second Year Students 

Anderson, Oscar Ellendale 

Benz, Flora Moffit 

Bj ur, Errtil Kulm 

Bobbe. Mark Ellendale 

Brown, George Ellendale 

Brown, Verda Ellendale 

Buck, Chas Temvik 

Buckmiller, Evelyn Brampton 

Burkhardt, Agnes Guelph 

Cook, Amy Ellendale 

Davis Frank Ellendale 

Farrier, Doris Ellendale 

Gillette, Evangeline Montevedio, Minn. 

Hafey, Delia Monango 

Handleman, Minnie Forbes 

Hogana, Esther Guelph 

Jahr. MJaro Bengough, Saskatchewan 

Johnson, Margaret Fullerton 

Jones, Paul Ellendale 

Kabrud, George Forbes 

Kelsh, Mary Fullerton 

Kieffer, Genevieve Dale 

Knox, Mabel Monango 

Martinson Nina Savo, S. Dak. 

Nelson, Julia Fullerton 

Nelson, Lottie Ellendale 

Pease, Herbert Stirum 

Peterson, Mildred Dale 

Pylman, Leonard Winship, S. Dak. 

Quam. Walter Rhame 

Strand, Selmer Ellendale 

Stolle, May Hecla, S. Dak. 

Schrader, Irene Ludden 

Snow, Cecil Oakes 

Ward, Earl Baldwin 

Weir, Ruth Rhame 

Weir, Margaret Rhame 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 73 

Wieste, Nina Ludden 

Wickersham, Lee Ellendale 

Willis, Clair Rhame 

Young, Victor Gackle 

First Year Students 

Black, George Fairmount 

Brady, Leora Bowman 

Colby, Lyle Frederick, S. Dak. 

Davis, Grace Stirum 

Davis, Jay E Stirum 

Dethlef sen, Emil Oakes 

Ferree, Harley Ellendale 

Franz, Willie Kulm 

Finch, Vera Cogswell 

Gray, Ellen Crete 

Hedlund, William Kulm 

Iverson, Eleanor Brampton 

Knopp, Fred Gackle 

Larson, Jennie Oakes 

Leischner, Salome Lehr 

McMartin, Leonard Ellendale 

Moore, Blanche Forbes 

Moore, Walter Forbes 

Mount, Lela Baldwin 

Murray, Allen Rhame 

Neilson, Nikoli Kulm 

Muller, Ray Ellendale 

Nelson, Oscar Ellendale 

Noess, Esther Ellendale 

Nordstrom, Elly Kulm 

Nordstrom, Ivar Kulm 

Northrup, Theodore Merricourt 

Olson, Emma Forman 

Peterson, George Rutland 

Pf romer, Robert Wirch 

Putnam, Paul Winona 

Reager, Leonard Rhame 

Reich, Fred Hellwig 

Rose, Alice Ellendale 

Schmierer, Emanual Ellendale 

St. Ores, Uva Ellendale 

Sullivan, Inez Ellendale 

Swanson, Anton Ellendale 

Tellberg, Henry Kulm 



74 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Thompson, Freda Ellendale 

Weber, Martin Linton 

Wolf, Jacob Fredonia 

Zimmerman, Albert Gackle 

Elementary Normal Course 

Bartell, Edna Fargo 

Chesbro, Susie Ellendale 

Daker, Fern LaMoure 

Enberg, Ethel Havana 

Engleman, Margaret Braddock 

Froemke, Louise . . Marion 

Jacobson, Nina Bessie 

Larson, Alfa Frederick, S. Dak. 

Pesio, Edna Frederick, S. Dak. 

Siemers, Ella Frederick, S. Dak. 

Sparks, May Braddock 

Titus, Edith Clement 

Special Students 

Barnes, Belva Ellendale 

Black, Marguerite Ellendale 

Bowers, Margaret Ellendale 

Brown, Floyd Ellendale 

Brown, Herbert Ellendale 

Brown, Wesley Ellendale 

Callan, Alice Ellendale 

Callan, Carrie Ellendale 

Crabtree, Spencer Ellendale 

Crandall, Fay Ellendale 

Crandall, Ethel Ellendale 

Crary, Charles Ellendale 

Cassels, Robert Ellendale 

Dunphy, Jessie Howell Ellendale 

Evans, Martha Ellendale 

Fields, Vesta Ellendale 

Fields, William Ellendale 

Geiszler, Edward Gackle 

George, Christen Lehr 

Gibbens, Gertrude Cando 

Hay, Ruth Revillo, S. Dak. 

Haskins, ■ Edward Ellendale 

House, Mildred Ellendale 

Holte, Maude Ellendale 

Leischner, Gottfried Lehr 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 75 

Leischner, Theodore Lehr 

Misf eldt, Elizabeth Ellendale 

Miller, Elizabeth Ellendale 

Mount, Neva Baldwin 

Olson, Beatrice Buxton 

Peek, Bersha Ellendale 

Peterson, James Marmarth 

Pokert, Bertha Fredonia 

Rosenthal, Ruth Ellendale 

Saunders, Rex Ellendale 

Wheeler, Wilbur Wessington Springs, S. Dak. 

Short Course Students 

Applequist, Morgan Ellendale 

Bjur, Bert Kulm 

Blomquist, Esther Kulm 

Chesebro, Albert Ellendale 

Chesebro, John Ellendale 

Colby, Leon Frederick 

Eldredge, Leon Gascoyne 

Engebretson, Otto Streeter 

Falkenstein, Ralph Baldwin 

Hoermann, Meta Ellendale 

Jahraus, Christina Piapot, Saskatchewan 

Jahraus, Anna Piapot, Saskatchewan 

Kemmit, Jacob Dawson 

Kemmitz, John Westfield, Wis. 

Kelsh, Francis Fullerton 

Lind, Agnes Wilton 

Lingk, Wm Beach 

McCory, John Linton 

Melanson, Alvin Marion 

Mentz, Willie Monango 

Myers, Earl Bloomingdale, Mich. 

Nelson, Earnest Streeter 

Retzloff. Bertha Ellendale 

Sager, Harry Forbes 

Sanderson, Clarence Velva 

Walz, Carrie Ashley 

Wedel, Walter Ellendale 

Young, Frank Monango 

Young, Philip Merricourt 



76 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Summer School Students, 1916 

Ackert, Hugh Ellendale 

Anderson, Louise Glover 

Austin, Lulu Ellendale 

Alexander, George Lisbon 

Ayres, Mattie Frederick, S. Dak. 

Ayres, Gladys Frederick, S. Dak. 

Barnes, Belva Ellendale 

Barnes, Bertha Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clara Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Clyde Ellendale 

Bjornstad, Mildred Ellendale 

Bjur, Emil Kulm 

Black. Wendell Ellendale 

Bristol, Josie Forbes 

Brooks, Iva Cogswell 

Brown, Daisy Ellendale 

Brown, Herbert Ellendale 

Brown, Bert Ellendale 

Brown, Maxwell Ellendale 

Buck, Charles Temvik 

Buck, Laura Linton 

Burkhardt, Mary Guelph 

Callan, Carrie Ellendale 

Callan, George Ellendale 

Campbell, Mrs. Cal Ellendale 

Carson, Mildred Scranton 

Cassels, Robert Ellendale 

Clarke, Ethel Braddock 

Coleman, Bessie Ellendale 

Colwell, Mabel Monango 

Combellick, Wilma Gettysburg, S. Dak. 

Cook, Angelina Ellendale 

Cornelisen. Antoinette Milbank, S. Dak. 

Cornelisen, Wilhlemina Milbank, S. Dak. 

Crabtree, Donald Ellendale 

Crain, Elma Monango 

Crain, Mabel Webster, S. Dak. 

Crandall, Fern Ellendale 

Caron, Mildred Cogswell 

Case, Mary Ellendale 

Cooper, Ora Newark, S. Dak. 

Davis, Walter Lehr 

Dawe, Gladys Fullerton 

Dean, Robert Ellendale 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 77 

Erickson, Carolina Oakes 

Esterby, Laive Ludden 

Everson, Mabel Washburn 

Featherstone, Eva Oakes 

Ferree, Myrtle Ellendale 

Fields, William Ellendale 

Fleming, Ernest Ellendale 

Fleming, Marion Ellendale 

Fladager, Viola Glover 

Frojen, Julia Glover 

Fuller, Clark Ellendale 

Fulton, Dollie Forbes 

Fulton, Marie Forbes 

George, Margaret Forbes 

Gibson, Raymond . Ellendale 

Gibson, Lawrence Ellendale 

Gray, Lulu Fullerton 

Graham, Gladys Ellendale 

Guyott, Clara Oakes 

Guyott, Ruth Oakes 

Haas, Katie Ellendale 

Harris, Edna M Kilbuurn, Wis. 

Harm, Pearl Ellendale 

Harvey, Catherine Aberdeen, S. Dak. 

Hatfield, Phil Ellendale 

Hatfield, Edna Ellendale 

Hay, Ruth Revillo, S. Dak. 

Herbert, Caston Ellendale 

Herrmann, Amelia Monango 

Hill, Myrtle Ellendale 

Hohlwegler, Mary Ellendale 

Hohlwegler, Olive Ellendale 

Hollender, Regina Packwaukee, Wis. 

Hogan, Hazel Scranton 

Howard, Nellie Ellendale 

Hutsinpiller, Dorothy Oakes 

Hutsinpiller, Ina Oakes 

Hyatt, Ethel Ludden 

Haas, Ruth '. Ellendale 

Hanson, Louisa Brampton 

Jeska, Fred Ellendale 

Johansen, Agnes Ellendale 

Johnsen, Bessie Campbell Ellendale 

Johnstone, Charles Ashley 

Joseph, Pearl Ellendale 



78 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Kabrud, Cora Forbes 

Kallestad, Georgia Crete 

Kalbus, Elsie Ellendale 

Keagle, Beatrice Winship, S. Dak. 

Keagle, Marion Winship, S. Dak. 

Kelly, Mable Englevale 

King, Capitola Ursina, Penn. 

Knox, Bertha Monango 

Kohnke, Maud Hecla, S. Dak. 

Kronschanbel, Emily Frederick, S. Dak. 

Lane, Leslie Ellendale 

Larson, Anna Oakes 

Leasure, Fred Solomon, Kansas 

Leverty, Agnes Ellendale 

Lynch, Mary Havana 

Mehlhaff, Theresa Armour 

Maltby, George Forman 

McCafferty, Dewey Roscoe, S. Dak. 

McConville, Alice Forbes 

McCauley, Stella Oakes 

McGraw, Gene Cogswell 

McMartin, Battelle Ellendale 

McMaster, Lloyd , Ellendale 

McNerney, Cecilia Oakes 

Meachen, Leonard Ellendale 

Meszaros, Margaret Cogswell 

Mock, Maude Ellendale 

Morgans, Ira Frederick, S. Dak. 

McMerney, Charlotte Oakes 

McGinnis, Lillian Ellendale 

Nelson, Grinella Milnor 

Nelson, Jennie Ellendale 

Nelson, Oscar Ellendale 

Newton, Leona Monango 

Nichols, Bertha Kulm 

Noess, Lulu Ellendale 

Norris, Amy Anoka, Minn. 

Payton, Bessie Oakes 

Pederson, Fritz Oakes 

Peterson, Ada Rutland 

Peterson, Gladys Edmunds 

Porter, Ruskin Ellendale 

Porter, Preston Ellendale 

Rehberg, Margaret Hannaf ord 

Ritmiller, Martha Ellendale 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 79 

Robinson, Josephine Forbes 

Rossmiller, Leona Ellendale 

Rowe, Annie Forbes 

Rost, Margaret Ellendale 

Savey, Bethel Cogswell 

Schrader, Vera Ludden 

Schermann, Anna Frederick, S. D. 

Schermann, Gara Frederick, S. Dak. 

Shepard, Irma Ellendale 

Saunders, Ethel , '. . Ellendale 

Sandon, Nona Forbes 

Schon, Anna Ellendale 

Schon, Julia t Ellendale 

Schon, Katheryn Ellendale 

Schwalier, Anna Golden Valley 

Shimmin, Ellen J Forbes 

Smith, Chas Ellendale 

Smith, Dorothy Ellendale 

Strutz, Arthur Oakes 

St. John, Mabel Ellendale 

St. Ores, Alita Ellendale 

Sullivan, Olive Ellendale 

Swangstu, Sarah Lidgerwood 

Talbott, Gladys Forbes 

Thompson, Fred Fairdale 

Thrams, Everett Bismarck 

Tjostem, Louise Lidgerwood 

Tusow, Edna Brampton 

Turnham, Frances Ludden 

Vennum, Ida M Monango 

Vennum, Laura Monango 

Wagner, Winnie Guelph 

Walz, Fred Ashley 

Wattula, Hillia Ludden 

Ward, Hiram Ellendale 

Way, Winnif red Guelph 

Weber, Mamie Forbes 

Weber, Ruth Forbes 

Welcher, Donna Ellendale 

Wessel, Hazel Wahpeton 

Wentzel, Helen Ellendale 

Wirch, Mary Wirch 

Yeager, Peter Forbes 

Young, Mabel Ellendale 



80 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

Zieman, Gertrude Oakes 

Williams, Beulah Ellendale 

SUMMARY 

Senior Class 37 

Junior Class :..... 25 

Third Year Class 8 

Second Year Class 41 

First 'Year Class 43 

Elementary Normal Courses 12 

Special Students 3S 

Short Course Students 29 

Total 233 

Students in the Summer School of 1916 180 

413 
Number of students counted twice 25 

Total 388 






Ind 



ex 



Admission , 13 

Agriculture 51 

Athletics 19, 68 

Bacteriology 51 

Board and Rooms 10 

Board of Regents 3 

Bookkeeping 57 

Buildings 10 

Calendar 2 

Chemistry 50 

Civics 59 

Commercial-Academic Course 29 

Commercial Department 56 

Cooking 45 

Courses of Study „ 21 

Credits 13 

Description of Courses 33 

Diploma and Certificates , 14 

Discipline 17 

Domestic Arts and Science 45 

Dormitory, Dacotah Hall 10 

Drawing and Fine Arts 60 

Dressmaking . . 47 

Education 33 

Elective Courses 13 

Engineering Farm 42 

English 53 

Expenses 17 

Faculty 4 

Fine Arts Course 60 

Food Analysis - . . . 50 

Forging 36 

General Information 9 

German 56 

Grammar 53 

Gymnastics 14 



INDEX— Continued 

High School Graduates 13, 24 

History 59 

Home Economics 45 

Latin 55 

Lecture Course 20 

Library 18 

Life of Student 10 

List of Students 70 

Literary and Musical Societies 19 

Location and Equipment 10 

Manual Training 40 

Mathematics 48 

Mechanic Arts , 35 

Mechanic Arts Course 27 

Mechanical Drawing 39 

Military Science 65 

Music — Vocal 64 

Music — Instrumental 62 

Normal Courses 21, 26 

Observation and Teaching 35 

Pattern Making 37 

Physics 50 

Physical Education 68 

Prizes 15 

Prospective Students 20 

Psychology 33 

Purpose of the School 9 

Relation to Other Schools 15 

Religious Environment 20 

Requirements for Graduation — see courses 

Rural Course . . . ; 21 

Short Courses 42, 47 

Special Students 18 

Stenography and Typewriting 57 

Summer School 20 

Turnery 37 






%v 






0MWERS1TY OF ILLWOIS LIBRARY 



W 



THE BULLETIN 



North Dakota 



Mtffiiwuniift aaMtf artWHW* 



State .fibucmal and 
IndustliaLJSU&ool 

Ellendale, North Dakota 




M ''l/PDOfT^ 



ERSITY OF ILLINO 
' .iniitr«tr»f Library 



Catalog Number / // 

June, 1918 







THE BULLETIN 



North Dakota State Normal 

and 

Industrial School 



Catalog Number 

June, 1918 
Vol. 13, No. 3 



Published Quarterly by the 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

EUendale, North Dakota 



Entered August 8. 1907, at EUendale, No. Dak., under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904 



CALENDAR 



1918 



Fall Term, Twelve Weeks 

Registration Tuesday, Oct. 1 and Wednesday, Oct. 2. 

Class Work Begins Thursday, October 3 

Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A. and Faculty Eeception 

.1 Saturday evening, Oct. 5 

Thanksgiving Holiday Thursday, November 28 

Fall Term Ends Saturday evening, December 21 

1919 

Winter Term, Twelve Weeks 

Registration Monday, January 6 and Tuesday, January 7 

Class Work Begins Wednesday, January 8 

Reception to Short Course Students 

- Saturday Evening, January 11 

Annual Military Contest Friday, March 21 

Winter Term Ends Friday Evening, March 28 

Spring Term, Twelve Weeks 

Registration of Students Tuesday, April 1 

Class Work Begins Wednesday, April 2 

Annual Oratorical Contest Tuesday Evening, May 13 

Field Day and May Fete - Saturday, May 17 

Junior-Senior Reception Saturday, June 14 

Baccalaureate Address —.Sunday, June 15 

Annual Declamatory Contest Monday, June 16 

Annual School Concert Tuesday, June 17 

Senior Class Play Wednesday, June 18 

Commencement, 10:30 a. m Thursday, June 19 

President's Reception Thursday, June 19 

Alumni Reunion ...., Friday, June 20 

Summer Term, Six Weeks 

Registration Monday, June 23 

Work Begins Tuesday, June 2-1 

Summer Term Ends Friday Evening, August 1 



STATE BOARD OF REGENTS 

Hon. Robert T. Muir, A. B., Sarles, N. Dak. 

Term Expires: July 1, 1923 

Hon. George A. Totten Bowman, N. Dak. 

Term Expires: July 1, 1923 

Hon. Lewis F. Crawford, A. B., A. M Sentinel Butte, N. Dak. 

Term Expires: July 1, 1921 
President of the Board 

Hon. J. D. Taylor, M. D Grand Forks, N. Dak. 

Term Expires; July 1, 1919 

Hon. Charles E. Vermilya, A. M., S. T. B.,....Bismarck, N. Dak. 
Term Expires: July 1, 1919 



Charles Liessman, Secretary of the Board ..-Bismarck, 1ST. Dak. 

Fanny C. Crawford, Local Secretary for the State Normal and 
Industrial School Ellendale, N. Dak. 






FACULTY 1917-1918 



E. M. BLACK . President 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1895; A, M., 1910; 
Graduate student, University of Chicago; Professor in 
Eed River Valley University, 1895-97, 1899-1903; Su- 
perintendent of Wahpeton City Schools, 1903-5; Coun- 
ty Superintendent of Richland County, 1905-9; Pro- 
fessor of History and Political Science, State School 
of Science, 1909-14; State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1914. 

E. W. ACKERT Mathematics 

Graduate Illinois State Normal University, 1899; B. 
Pd., Steinman College, 1901; A. B., Drake University 
1907; Superintendent of Schools, 1901-7; State Nor- 
mal and Industrial School, 1907. 

*W. G. BOWERS Physical Science 

West Virginia State Normal, 1897; A. B., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1905; A. M.^ Indiana State Uni- 
versity, 1910; Assistant, Department of Biology, Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1903-5; Principal of Schools, 
Leesburg, O., 1905-6; Instructor in Science, Indiana 
Normal 1906-7; Graduate student University of Cali- 
fornia, 1915; State Normal and Industrial School, 1907. 

CARRIE TUTTLE Librarian 

A. B., Wittenberg College; Student in Library 
Economy, Chicago University. State Normal and In- 
dustrial School, 1907. 

GABRIELLA C. BRENDEMUHL....English, Modern Language 

A. B., Carleton College, 1905; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Teacher of German and Preceptress, Rochester Acad- 
emy, 1905-08; High School Assistant Principal, 1908-10; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1910. 

•Absent on leave during 1917-1918. 



*BEATRICE OLSON English, PuDlic Speaking 

B. A., University of North Dakota; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Emerson College of Oratory ^ Boston; Principal of High 
School, Rugby, N. D.; Instructor English and Public 
Speaking, Fargo, N. D.; State Normal and Industrial, 
School, 1913. 

OLIN E. COMBELLICK Director of Normal Department 

Graduate of Normal Department, Dakota University; 
B. S., Dakota Wesleyan University; Superintendent of 
Schools, 1907-1913; Graduate Student, University of 
Chicago, 1915; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1913. 

FLOYD C. HATHAWAY Agriculture and Botany 

B. S., South Dakota State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts; student Parker College; stuaent Minne- 
sota School of Agriculture; graduate student Univers- 
ity of Wisconsin; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1913-1918. 

JENNIE J. HARNSBERGER Preceptress, Fine Arts 

Graduate Wisconsin State Normal School; Teachers 
Course, Art Institute, Chicago; Crafts-Handicraft 
Guild, Minneapolis. Supervisor of Drawing, Albert 
Lea, Minnesota, 1906-12; Art Student, Chicago, 1912- 
13; State Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

FANNY C. CRAWFORD .....Secretary, Registrar 

M. Accts., Salt City Business College, 1914. State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1914. 

HERBERT BROWN - History, Pedagogy 

Student Dakota Wesleyan University, University of 
South Dakota; Graduate State Normal and Industrial, 
School, 1917; Principal of Schools, Lennox, South Da- 
kota; Principal of Schools, Harrisburg, South Dakota; 
Principal of Schools, Napoleon, North Dakota, 1909-11. 
County Superintendent of Logan County, 1911-1915. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 

*Absent on leave during 1917-1918. 



TTLDA E. NATWICK Home Economics 

Valley City Normal School; Stevens Point, Wiscon- 
sin Normal School; Student, Stout Institute; Principal 
of Schools, Embarrass, Wis., four years; Teacher Do- 
mestic Science, Minto, N. D., 1911-1913; Domestic 
Science, Jamestown, N. D., City Schools, 1913-1915; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 



L. B. FIELDS :....Director of Mechanic Arts 

M. E., Purdue University, 1907; Assistant in Practi- 
cal Mechanics, Purdue University, 1905-07; Instructor 
in Mechanical Drawing and Pattern Making, Indiana 
Industrial School, 1907-10; Normal-Industrial School, 
1910-12; Bellingham, Washington, City Schools, 1912- 
1915; State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 



J. T. FULLEE Psychology 

B. A % Carleton College, 1897; Graduate Student Uni- 
versity of Minnesota; Superintendent of City Schools in 
Minnesota, 1897-1912; New Eockford, N. D., 1912-15; 
Summer Training Schools in Minnesota, three years; 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 



LULU M. POTTS Physical Education for Women 

A. B., Simpson College, 1914; Principal of High 
School, Casey, Iowa, 1914-1915; Graduate Normal 
School of Physical Education, Battle Creek, Mich., 
1916. State Normal and Industrial School, 1916. 



JESSIE HOWELL DUNPHY Piano 

Student St. Mary's Hall, Fairbault, Minnesota. 
Piano teacher State Normal and Industrial School, 
1909-11; student Cosmopolitan School of Music and 
Dramatic Art, Chicago; Concert training in Berlin, 
1910-1912. State Normal and Industrial School, 1914- 
1916, 1917. 



L. MAUDE FINLEY Hojne Economics 

Graduate of Kansas State Manual Training Normal 
1912; Student, University of Colorado; Student Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1 916-1917; Instructor 
in Domestic Science and Art, Molinc, Kansas, 1914- 
1916; State Normal and Industrial School, 1917. 

LILLIACE LORENE MOTGOMERY English, Public Speaking 
A. B., University of Chicago, 1915; Teacher High 
School Boyne City, Michigan, 1915-16; Principal of High 
School, Franklin Grove, 111., 1916-1917. State Normal 
and Industrial School, 1917-1918. 

R. L. CAMPBELL Physical Science 

A. B., University of Oklahoma; C. E. course Scranton, 
Pa., Science and physical director in Woods County 
High School 1906-7; Physical director East St. Louis 
High School 1909-10; Prof, of Mathematics Jamestown 
College, 1910-12; Dean New Rockford Collegiate 
Institute, 1912-13; President New Rockford Col- 
legiate Institute, 1913-16. State Normal and Industrial, 
School, 1917. 

ROBERT LAUD ASHLEY Manual Training 

Graduate Hackley Manual Training School and 
Hackley Normal, Muskegon, Mich., 1913. Special Stu- 
dent, Northern Normal and Industrial School, 1915. 
Teacher in High School, Waterloo, Iowa, 1913-1917; 
State Normal and Industrial School 1917. 

OSCAR E. ANDERSON Athletics, History 

Graduate State Normal School, Valley City, N. Dak., 
A. B., Highland Park College, Des Moines, Iowa, 
1915; Two years assistant coach in college. Four years 
teaching experience in grades and high school; Athletic 
Director, Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915-1916; Ath- 
letic Director, Ft. Smith, Arkansas, 1916-1917; State 
Normal and Industrial School, 1917. 

MAJORIE AILEEN KECK Vocal Music, Harmony 

A. B., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1915, Student 
Illinois Wesleyan College of Music; Student Univers- 
ity of Illinois College of Music, 1916-1917; With 
Chautauqua Lyceum; Teacher of Music in High School, 
Lawrenceville, 111., 1915-1916; State Normal and In- 
dustrial School, 1917. 



EDITH L. JOHNS Commercial Arts 

Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas; Graduate of 
Gem City Business College, Quincy, Illinois and 
Spaldings' Business College, Kansas City, Missouri; 
Commercial Teacher in High School, Moline, Kansas, 
Three years; State Normal and Industrial School, 
1917. 



FLORENCE MARSH Teacher Model Rural School 

Graduate State Normal School, Stevens Point, 
Wis.; Teacher Rural Schools four years, Graded 
Schools, three years; Principal State Graded Schools, 
three years; Teacher in County Normal School, Anti- 
go, Wis., 1915-1917. State Normal and Industrial 
School, 1917. 

F. B. HARRINGTON Supervisor of Observation in Teaching 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1906; M. A. Tjniversity of 
Minnesota, 1911; High School Instructor, Deputy 
County Superintendent of Schools; Superintendent 
of Schools, Shakopee, Minn., 1914-1917. Superin- 
tendent of Schools. Ellendale, N. D. 1917. 

RLTH MAE HAAS Assistant in Piano 

State Normal and Industrial School, 1914; Special 
student of Music three years; Teacher in Public 
Schools, two years. Teacher of Music, one year. 
State Normal and Industrial School, 1917. 

MRS. LAURA E. DRUM Matron 

FRED RITMILLER Head Janitor 



General Information 



PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE SCHOOL 

The North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School was 
established by legislative enactment in 1893 in accordance 
with a section of the state constitution providing for its 
creation. The revised law of 1907 relating to this school 
reads as follows: 

"That the institution located at Ellendale, Dickey county, 
North Dakota, be designated the State Normal and Industrial 
School, the object of such school being to provide instruction 
in a comprehensive way in wood and iron work and the vari- 
ous other branches of domestic economy as a co-ordinate 
branch of education, together with mathematics, drawing and 
the other school studies and to prepare teachers in the science 
of education and the art of teaching in the public schools with 
special reference to manual training. " 

The report of the State Board of Regents contains the 
following statement of policy: "The Normal and Industrial 
School at Ellendale should prepare teachers for the elementary 
schools of the state on the same basis as other normal schools. 
In addition to its work as a normal school it should, because 
of its equipment for instruction in industrial subjects, con- 
tinue to give instruction in these subjects. " 

It is believed that with this broad but well defined mission 
the Normal and Industrial School offers superior advantages 
to the young people of the state. Educational thought of the 
day is constantly emphasizing more and more the practical 
and everyday duties and problems of life along with the pro- 
cesses of formal culture. This school is well equipped to 
give this many sided and full preparation for complete life. 

A cordial invitation to visit the school is extended to all 
persons who may be interested in school work, and especially 
to those engaged in educational work. The school will wel- 
come inquiries concerning teachers trained in its different de- 
partments. There is a demand for such teachers and public 
school officials will find that it is the purpose of the admin- 
istration of the school to place its graduates so that they will 
serve the state with credit to themselves and the interest in- 
volved. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 11 



LOCATION 

Ellendale, in which the State Normal and Industrial School 
is located, is a beautiful little city in the center of a good 
agricultural region. It is the county seat of Dickey county, 
and is on both the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, and the 
Great Northern railways, twelve miles south of the Soo Line 
and twenty-eight miles from Edgeley where the Nothern Pac- 
ific and Midland Eailways are met. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the State Normal and Industrial School 
consists of five main buildings, a foundry, a model rural 
school, a demonstration farm and barn, and an athletic field, 

DACOTAH HALL. This is a thoroly modern three story 
brick building and is an unusually attractive home for young 
women. The reception hall and society rooms are unusually 
pleasing. Here the young women of the school are surrounded 
by a stimulating and Christian influence. The purpose of the 
administration of the hall is to make it, not a boarding house, 
but a home, where every effort may be put forth to main- 
tain the amenities of life, which prevail in homes of influence, 
refinement and good cheer. It is believed that the social life 
which the hall offers is one of the most valuable pnrts oi the 
student's education while here. The building is arranged to 
accommodate nearly one hundred students, and is modern thru- 
out having a complete equipment of bathroom, toilet room, 
steam heat, electric light and laundry. All the rooms are well 
lighted and well arranged. Bedding must be furnished by 
the students themselves. Each young lady intending to reside 
at the hall should bring at least three sheets, three pillow 
cases, blankets, towels, soap and napkins. Preference in 
choice of rooms is given in order of application. The health 
and comfort of the students are the first consideration, and 
all matters relating to food, hygiene and sanitation are care- 
fully observed. 

L : vi?ig expenses, including board, room, lighc. heat, and use 
of laundry and bath rooms, are $16.00 per month of fom 
weeks. Table board is $3.50 per week. Tl.e rate is exceed- 
ingly low, when one considers the completeness of the ser- 
vice offered. Table board is excellent and the building is 
finely equipped. Single meals and meals to guests are 25 



12 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 

cents each. Bills are payable one month in advance. No dis- 
count is made for absences of less than a week except in the 
Case of regular vacations, as indicated in the calendar. Stu- 
dents are required to take care of their own rooms. Mail is 
taken to the postoffice and delivered twice a day. 

CARNEGIE HALL. This is a four story pressed brick 
structure, beautiful and commodious. In it are found the Nor- 
mal Department, Departments of Science, English, MathemnLics, 
Commercial Arts, Fine Arts, Instrumental Music and the Li- 
brary. In each department the equipment is such that stu- 
dents may reap the most generous returns from their efforts. 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Physiography are taught in 
laboratories in the most approved manner; the Department of 
English has access to abundant literature, the Commercial De- 
partment is provided with typewriters, duplicators, Edison dic- 
tation phonograph records, etc., the Department of Music owns 
nine upright pianos for practice and teaching purposes and a 
Mason & Hamlin Baby Grand for concert playing and accom- 
panying in vocal music; the Department of Fine Arts is equip- 
ped with easels, drawing desks, tables, a large number of casts, 
lockers, kiln for firing china, etc.; the library is generously 
provided with fiction, history, biography, scientific works, ref- 
erence texts, etc., is equipped with a card catalog and Readers 
Guide, and is gradually accumulating bound volumes of the 
standard magazines. 

HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING. A three story red 
briek building houses the Department of Domestic Science and 
Art. The department occupies the entire upper floor, and the 
low or floor in part, and is equipped with sewing machines, 
charts, lockers, tables, desks, cooking utensils, ranges, individ- 
ual gas stoves and ovens. It also has the necessary demonstra- 
tion table, dishes, silverware, linen, glassware, etc., for the 
dining room. 

MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING. This is a two story red 
brick structure 70 ft. wide by 140 ft. long. The departments of 
Mechanical Drawing, Carpentry and Turnery occupy the up- 
per floor and are equipped with drafting benches, lathes, 
benches, individual and special tools, Fox trimmer, mortiser, 
tenoning machine, band saw, etc. 

The lower floor is occupied by the Machine Shop and the 
Department of Steam and Gas Engines. The machine shop is 
equipped with engine lathes, shaper, planer, milling machine, 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 13 



hack saw, grinder, etc. The department of steam and gas en- 
gines is equipped with a twenty-five-horse-power Ideal engine, 
a twenty-horse-power horizontal side crank Howell engine, a 
twenty-horse-power automatic gasoline engine, a Case traction 
engine, a Gaar-Scott dismounted traction engine, modern gas 
tractors, a four-horse-power stationary engine and boiler com- 
plete for demonstration purposes, an International portable gas 
engine, a four-horse-power Reliable gasoline engine, calorimet- 
ers, Crosby steam engine indicator, Amsler planimeter, friction 
brake, water meter injector, pumps, traps, boiler attachments, 
etc. 

ARMORY. This is a two story red brick building. The 
first floor is occupied in part by the locker rooms, and in part 
by the classes in forging, and is equipped with down-draft 
forges, anvils, hammers, vises, etc. The second floor consti- 
tutes the gymnasium and armory proper, and is equipped with 
dumb bells, Indian clubs, horizontal bars, traveling rings, 
spring board, vaulting horse, mats and the usual apparatus for 
physical training; and with shower baths and lockers. 

DEMONSTRATION FARM. Thirty acres, adjacent to the 
buildings, has been reserved for a demonstration farm. This 
has been fenced for cultivation and with the school garden is 
used for demonstration plats for the agriculture classes and 
to raise such crops as can be used around the school and 
boarding department. A small stock barn has been built and 
several head of live stock are kept both for their utility and 
for class study on the school farm. 

ATHLETIC FIELD. The N-I Athletic Field is 288 feet 
wide by 336 feet long, enclosed, and in it are found the base- 
ball diamond, foot-ball field, out-door basket-ball field, rifle 
range and grand stand. Here are held the out-of-door meets 
and the target practice of Company A. Excellent tennis 
courts are maintained by a student-faculty tennis association. 

MODEL SCHOOL. Arrangements have been made whereby 
the Ellendale City Schools give our normal students superior 
privileges in luoJel school work. The city school grounds are 
conveniently located two blocks from the State school campus, 
and the building is a new $60,000 structure modern in every 
respect. This affords our senior normal students an opportun- 
ity to do teaching and observation under most favorable con- 
ditions. 



14 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



MODEL EUEAL SCHOOL. During the past year this insti- 
tution has added to its equipment a Model Rural School, 
which is conducted upon the campus for demonstration pur- 
poses. 

The pupils are all from the nearby farm homes and the 
teacher is a rural specialist. 

The building for the accommodation of this school is a one 
story frame structure, thirty-six feet square, with full base- 
ment, erected at a cost of about $4,000.00. It was designed as 
a model for rural communities. On the main floor are found 
a large school room, a boys' work room, a girls' work room, 
a book room and a coat room. The basement contains a large 
play room, a storage room, and toilets. The building is con- 
structed to meet the law requirements in light, space, and ven- 
tilation and is being equipped as a First Class Standardized 
Rural School. 

ADMISSION 

(1) Any young man or young woman of good moral char- 
acter, who has completed the common school course and re- 
ceived a diploma, will be admitted without examination. A 
preparatory course is maintained for those students who have 
not the home facilities for completing the eighth grade. Stu- 
dents incomplete in common school subjects must expect to 
make up work under special arrangement. 

(2) High school students and high school graduates will 
be admitted upon their credentials. 

(3) Students sixteen years of age or older will be admitted 
to the short courses without special regard to previous school 
training. Credit obtained in subjects of the short courses may 
apply on the regular courses where they are similar or may 
be used as electives. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All courses of the school in both normal and industrial de- 
partments are elective. Each student, by and with the advice 
of parents and teachers, chooses the course he is to pursue. 
This choice having been once made, no pupil will be permitted 
to change his course or to drop a subject except for the most 
important consideration and then only upon recommendation 
of the instructor and consent of the president. A student who 
voluntarily drops a subject without proper authority will be 
dropped from all classes until officially reinstated. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 15 



CREDITS 

The unit of credit is a term 's work in a subject, three units 
of credit constituting a years work in a subject. No credit 
is given for less than a term 's work. Credit for summer school 
work will be given under arrangement satisfactory to the de- 
partments concerned. Credits are given in terms of percent- 
age, 75 per cent being the passing grade. 

The letter "I" is used to indicate that work in a subject is 
incomplete and that a grade will be given when the required 
work is accomplished during the same or succeeding school 
year. The letter tt G ti is used to indicate that the work is so 
nearly up to a passing grade that the student may continue 
the subject and when the work in the subject is satisfactorily 
completed a passing grade will be given for the term's work 
that was conditioned. The letter "J?" is used to indicate fail- 
ure. The student receiving this mark must take the work over 
again to receive credit. 

In subjects requiring little or only occasional outside study, 
as shop work, cooking, etc., two periods of laboratory or reci- 
tation work are required daily to receive full credit. 

In all the regular courses (except in the Farm Engineer- 
ing course where there is considerable shop and laboratory 
work), five credit subjects constitute full work. 

GYMNASTICS AND MILITARY DRILL 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied young 
men in Military Drill to conform to the state requirements 
as set forth in Chapter 167 of the Session Laws of 1909: 

"The State Normal and Industrial School is authorized and 
required to give theoretical and practical instruction in Mili- 
tary Science, under such rules and regulations as the faculty 
of said institution may prescribe. " 

Two years' credit must be obtained by all able-bodied stu- 
dents in gymnastics. In special cases and for good reasons 
students may be excused from military drill or gymnastics by 
vote of the faculty upon petition. 

For requirements for physical education of young women 
see under Physical Education in this catalog. 



16 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATES 

The diploma granted on the completion of a five-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in two years' work beyond a 
fo^r-year high school course, entitles the holder to a second 
grade professional certificate for two years, and after nine 
months' successful experience in teaching, the holder of this 
diploma is entitled to a second grade professional certificate 
valid for life. 

The diploma granted on the completion of a four-year nor- 
mal course, or its equivalent in one years' work beyond a 
four-year high school course, entitles the holder to a second 
grade professional state certificate for two years, and after 
nine months' successful experience in teaching, the holder of 
this diploma is entitled to a second grade professional certi- 
ficate valid for five years. 

Graduates from the Normal Manual Training Course, the 
Normal Home Economics Course, or Fine Arts course, are 
entitled to a Special Certificate, which entitles the holder 
to teach that special art in the schools of the state. 

The State Board of Education has announced the following 
regulations in regard to obtaining the elementary certificates 
on completion of normal school courses, the fourth grade and 
third grade certificates designating the second grade and first 
grade elementary certificates of former years respectively; 

' ' Fourth grade certificates shall be granted without exam- 
ination to applicants who are persons of good moral char- 
acter possessing an aptness to teach and govern, are at least 
eighteen years of age, and have been granted a certificate of 
completion from a three-year course in some state normal 
school, this three-year course to require the completion of 
fifteen units or forty-five term credits of work above the 
eighth grade. ' ' 

"Third grade certificates shall be issued to applicants who 
are persons of good moral character possessing an aptness to 
teach and govern, who have completed a course as described, 
and in addition have had eight months of successful teach- 
ing experience." 

The first three years of the Normal, Normal Manual Train- 
ing, Normal Home Economics, and Academic courses are so 
arranged that these requirements may be met and the sub- 
jects taken may apply on the complete four or five year 
courses at a later time. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 17 



RELATION TO OTHER SCHOOLS 

As a number of its students sometime after graduation wish 
to go further in their academic training, arrangements have 
been made whereby graduates from this school are admitted 
to the following institutions with the standing indicated: 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA. The State 
University of North Dakota admits graduates upon their cre- 
dentials, allowing full credits for courses completed and ad- 
vanced standing as follows: 

"(1) Students who have graduated from a four-year high 
school course and who have also graduated from a one-year 
professional course in an accredited Normal School are allowed 
one year's credit (30 semester hours) on advanced standing. 

"(2) Graduates from the two-year North Dakota Normal 
Schools and Normal Schools having equal standing, who are 
also graduates of first-class high schools, will be granted 60 
units of advanced standing if they have completed all of the 
prescribed requirements for admission, and provided the sub- 
jects offered for advanced standing are in harmony with the 
group requirements for graduation. 

"(3) Students who are not high school graduates but have 
completed the regular four-year or five-year normal course are 
given 15 and 45 credits respectively on advanced standing (in- 
cluding in either case 4 credits in Psychology and 12 in Edu- 
cation.) M 

NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. The 
North Dakota Agricultural College admits to the Sophomore 
year of its Agricultural and General Science Courses all grad- 
uates of this school. 

ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. Graduates of 
the Mechanic Arts Course who have elected German and 
Trigonometry are admitted to Armour Institute without ex- 
amination and receive three years' credit in shop work. 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES. Graduates of the 
Mechanic Arts Course who elect Bookkeeping, are admitted 
without examination. 

Students of the State Normal-Industrial School are ad- 
mitted to other standard schools and colleges upon their cre- 
dentials. 



IS NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



PRIZES 

As an incentive to superior work the following prizes are 
open to all students for competition: 

(1) PRIZE IN ORATORY. The State Normal Industrial 
School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains first 
place in oratory under such rules as a committee of the facul- 
ty may prescribe. A silver medal is offered to the student 
who wins second place in oratory. 

(2) DECLAMATORY PRIZE. The State Normal and In- 
dustrial School offers a gold medal to the student who obtains 
first place in declamation under such rules as the faculty 
may prescribe. A second prize of a silver medal is offered 
the student winning second place. 

(3) ORIGINAL STORY PRIZE. This prize, given by 
the State Normal and Industrial School, is a gold medal, and 
is awarded to the student who prepares the best original short 
story. A silver medal will be awarded the student who pre- 
pares the second best original short story. The stories win- 
ning first and second prizes shall become the property of the 
school. 

(4) MILITARY PRIZE. (First.) The State Normal and 
Industrial School offers a silver medal to the cadet who wins 
first place in individual drill at the annual military contest. 
Won in 1918 by Ragnar Ogren. 

. (5) MILITARY PRIZE. (Second.) A bronze medal of- 
fered by the State Normal and Industrial School to the cadet 
winning second honors in the individual drill at the annual 
military contest. Won in 1918 by Ivar Nordstrom. 

(6) PRIZE IN DOMESTIC* 1 ARTS. L. S. Jones & Com- 
pany offers $5.00 worth of merchandise, to be selected by the 
winner, to the young woman who does the best work in the 
making of a white waist. Rules for the competition to be 
prescribed by the donors. 

(7) PRIZE IN MECHANIC ARTS. The Weldun Com- 
pany offers a pocket knife to the young man who exhibits the 
best workmanship on a piece of furniture, to be no less com- 
plicated than a table or chair. 

Commencement Honors. The senior student who has the 
highest average grade in his class standings will be the vale- 
dictorian of his class. The student with second highest grades 
will receive second honors at commencement. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 19 



STUDENT CONDUCT AND REGULATIONS 

Regularity in attendance, punctuality, industry, manly con- 
duct, and prompt obedience to lawful authority are impera- 
tive. In no sense is the State Normal and Industrial School 
a reform school and students who fail to yield a full and 
cheerful compliance to all requirements necessary for success- 
ful work and the honor of the school will be promptly dis- 
missed. Discipline is educative when reasonable and intel- 
ligible. This is the guiding thought with which all discipline 
is adminstered. 

Rooming Places. All young women (except students of 
Ellendale) will be expected to room and board at Dacotah 
Hall unless for some special reason express permission to 
room elsewhere has been granted by the faculty. 

Young men will be expected to room at places approved by 
the faculty and must secure the consent of t'ie president be- 
fore making any change in rooming place during any term. 
Persons at whose homes these young men room are expected 
to provide suitable heat and light and to aid in every reason- 
able manner in creating conditions favorable to study and to 
healthful living. Students are expected to be quiet in be- 
havior, considerate, careful in the use of furniture, and to 
conduct themselves at all times as gentlemen. 

All students rooming in private homes are expected to con- 
form to school regulations in regard to study hours, participa- 
tion in amusements not in connection with the school, and 
other matters of similiar character. 

Advisers. Shortly after enrollment each student is assigned 
to a member of the faculty who will act as his adviser in the 
choice of studies and in all matters in which he asks or needs 
the counsel of an older person who has had wider educational 
and life experience than the student. 

EXPENSES 

An incidental fee of $5.00 a term is charged all students, 
except those taking only special lessons in music and fine 
arts. This amount includes all miscellaneous fees charged in 
former years, but does not include materials in home economics 
and manual training consumed for personal use, which are 
charged to the student at cost. Locker rent, twenty-five 
cents. 



20 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Fees for private lessons in music are $12.00 for a term of 
twelve lessons. Private lessons in fine arts are $9.00 for a 
term of twelve lessons. Piano rent is $3.00 per term of three 
months. 

Extra fee for late enrollment, fifty cents, except in cases of 
a student 's first enrollment for the year. 

Room and board at Dacotah Hall is $4.00 per week, pay- 
able by the month, in advance. Good room and board may be 
had in private families at prices ranging from $5.00 per week 
and upward. Many students rent rooms and board themselves. 
Board and room rent, the chief items of expense, range from 
$144 to $185 per year of 36 weeks. These very reasonable 
rates Avill be maintained so long as prices will permit, but the 
school reserves the right to advance price of board if prices on 
food stuffs continue to advance. 

The following deposit fees (subject to return) are required 
of those using the material: Drawing set, $7.50; locker key, 
fifty cents; chemistry breakage, $2.00. 

LIBRARY 

A commodious and well lighted room in Carnegie Hall has 
been set apart for use as a library and reading room. It is 
open to all students until 5:00 o'clock school days. Arrange- 
ments are made by which students can draw books for use at 
times 1 when the library is closed. 

The library contains a large collection of books labeled and 
catalogued; a cabinet card catalogue; bound volumes of the 
leading magazines; Reader's Guide; congressional records, 
government reports and much other valuable material. New 
additions are constantly being made. Each department of the 
school has a well selected line of books for reference work. 
The leading magazines and newspapers are at the disposal of 
students. A trained librarian is in charge. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who are unable to carry a regular program, may, 
upon recommendation of the classification committee, arrange 
for special work. All such students, however, must satisfy 
the committee that their preparation is sufficient to warrant 
their enrollment in the subjects desired. No student deemed 
deficient in the fundamentals will be permitted to elect the 
arts exclusively, but a fair balance will be maintained be- 
tween so-called intellectual and manual training subjects. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 21 



LITERARY, MUSICAL AND ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

There are four literary societies maintained for the purpose 
of affording practice in speaking in public and to train in de- 
bating. 

The Alphian and the Delta Epsilon Phi literary societies 
are organizations of the young women, and the Sigma Pi Iota 
and Mechanic Arts Society those of the young men. 

Two glee clubs and an orchestra are maintained. The 
course in music in public schools has been considerably en- 
larged and made more interesting and valuable to the stu- 
dent in reference to general education. Several recitals and 
concerts are given during the year. A year's credit in music 
may be earned by faithful work in band, orchestra or glee 
club, the number of credits to be earned in this way being 
limited to a total of three. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A vol- 
untary organization which aims to promote Christian life is 
maintained among the* young women of the school. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. A branch 
of the Young Men 's Christian Association is maintained under 
the management of the students. 

ATHLETICS. Foot-ball, basket-ball, base-ball and track 
athletics are organized and games are played under supervision 
of the faculty. A regular athletic director is employed, who 
has charge of all athletic activities for young men. 

The Mecca for Pep is a society maintained by the young 
ladies of the department of physical education to promote in- 
terest in athletic activities appropriate- for young women. 

ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

A splendid entertainment course under the management of 
the school has become a well defined feature of student life, 
and is filling an educational need. A special student rate for 
a season ticket is made, the regular price for others being two 
dollars and fifty cents for the course. The entertainments 
are given in the fall and winter term, and for 1918-1919 they 
will include the Boston Opera Stars, the Sala Trio, the Plym- 
outh Singers, Dr. Bradley, Henry Irvin Jones and V. S. 
Watkins. 

In the summer an excellent chautauqua under a citizen's 
organization is conducted near the school. Students at the 
summer session obtain season tickets at greatly reduced rates. 



22 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

A summer session of six weeks? is held each year beginning 
the week following the annual commencement. The school 
held in former years in co-operation with the neighboring 
counties has' been discontinued and this session will be an ad- 
ditional term of the normal school year. At this session 
those who wish to make up deficiencies or to earn credits 
on any of the courses will find opportunity to do so as classes 
will be formed on demand of sufficient number if not already 
provided for in the schedule. Many find it more convenient 
to attend in the summer, and by attending the latter part of 
the spring term and the summer session young men can make 
a full term's credit between seeding time and harvest. A 
special summer schoiol bulletin is published announcing the 
work of this session of the school. A copy may be obtained 
for the asking. 

RELIGIOUS ENVIRONMENT 

The church organizations of the city take a deep interest in 
the students, many of whom are identified with their activi- 
ties. Students are urged to attend the church of their choice. 
Bible' study classes covering the state high school syllabus are 
maintained by the various church organizations of the city. 
These are under competent leaders and students who success- 
fully pursue the course may earn a half years credit to be 
accepted as an elective in any course. 



TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 






Study this catalogue thoroly. 

Be present the first day of the term. 

Plan to take time in acquiring an education. 

Bring with you such text books as you may have. 

Write the president that you are' coming. 

Come with a determination to make this school year the best 
year of your life. 

Bring a letter of recommendation from your pastor or teach- j 
er. This is not required, but serves as a letter of introduc- , 
tion. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 23 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The following courses of study have been carefully arranged 
to comply with the laws of the state and the regulations of 
the state board of education. 

Attention is called to the new plan of the courses. A well 
defined division is drawn between courses of secondary and 
collegiate rank. The first three years of the Normal, the 
Normal Manual Training, the Normal Home Economics, the 
Mechanic Arts and the Junior Home Economics courses are 
known as secondary courses, the subjects offered being equiv- 
alent to those given in the average four year high school. 
The fourth year of the Normal, the Normal Manual Training, 
the Normal Home Economics, the Mechanic Arts and Junior 
Home Economics courses are designated as junior courses, 
and the fifth year of the Normal, Normal Manual Training, 
Normal Home Economics and Mechanic Arts courses as senior 
courses. 

A student enrolled in a junior course will be classified as a 
junior, even tho he expects to receive his diploma at the end 
of the year. A student receiving such diploma will be known 
as a junior graduate. 

The State Normal and Industrial School offers the follow- 
ing curricula: 

THE SENIOR NORMAL COURSE 

or Two Year Course for High School Graduates. 

THE JUNIOR NORMAL COURSE 

or One Year Course for High School Graduates. 

FIVE YEAR COURSES 

THE FIVE YEAR NORMAL COURSE, consisting of the Sec- 
ondary Normal Course and the Senior Normal Course or 
their equivalents, 

THE NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE. 

THE NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE. 

THE MECHANIC ARTS COURSE (an industrial course). 



24 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



FOUR YEAR COURSES 

THE FOUR YEAR NORMAL COURSE, consisting of the 
Secondary Normal Course and the Junior Normal Course 
or their equivalents, 

THE JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS COURSE (an industrial 
course). 

SECONDARY COURSES 

For students who have not completed High School training. 
THE SECONDARY NORMAL COURSE. 
THE ACADEMIC COURSE. 
THE COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

THE SHORT COURSES 

THE TWO Y r EAR COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

THE SHORT COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING. 

THE SHORT COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 



SPECIAL COURSES 

THE THREE Y^EAR PIANO COURSE. 
THE THREE Y r EAR VOICE COURSE. 

Unless otherwise specified all subjects require five recita- 
tions per week. Two laboratory or shop periods are required 
for one period of credit. * 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



25 



SENIOR NORMAL COURSE 

Two Year Course for High School Graduates 

Leading to a life second grade professional certificate 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Term 
English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English V 

Hist, of Education 

Adv. Pedagogy 

American History 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



Winter Term 
English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 

SENIOR YEAR 



English V 

Prin. of Education 

Obs. & Teaching 
American History 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 
English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English V 

School Administration 

Obs. & Teaching 

Political Science 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



JUNIOR NORMAL COURSE 

One Year Course for High School Graduates 

Leading to a second grade professional certificate 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall? Term 

English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Winter Term 
English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 
English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Obs. & Teaching 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



THE FIVE YEAR NORMAL COURSE consists of the 
Secondary Normal Course with the Senior Normal Course in 
addition thereto. 

THE FOUR YEAR NORMAL COURSE consists of the 
Secondary Normal Course with the completion of the Junior 
Normal Course in addition thereto. 



26 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Algebra 

Agriculture and 
Nature Study 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing ( % ') 
Man. Tr. I 
Drill or Gym 



Winter Term 
English I 
Algebra 

Agriculture and 
Nature Study 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing (%) 
Man. Tr. I 
Drill or Gym 



Spring Term 
English I 
Algebra 

Agriculture and 
Nature Study 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing (%) 
Man. Tr. I 
Drill or Gym 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. II 
Drill 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. II 
Drill 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Man. Tr. II 
Drill 



THIRD YEAR 



English III 
Arithmetic 
El. Psychology 

U. S. History 
Man. Tr. Ill 
Gymnasium 



English III 
Arithmetic 
El. Pedagogy, Obs. 

and Teaching 
Civics 

Man. Tr. Ill 
Gymnasium 



English III 
Physiology 
El. Pedagogy, Obs. 

and Teaching 
Rural Sociology 
Man. Tr. Ill 
Gymnasium 



FOURTH YEAR 



English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Solid Geometry 

Man. Tr. IV 



English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Solid Geometry (%) 
Adv. Algebra ( Y 2 ) 
Man. Tr. IV 



English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 

Adv. Algebra 
Special Methods 



FIFTH YEAR 



English V 
Hist, of Education 
Adv. Pedagogy 
Adv. American 

History 
Man. Tr. V 



English V 

Prin. of Education 

Engines 

Adv. American 

History 
Man. Tr. V 



English V 

School Administration 
Applied Mechanics 
Political Science 

Man. Tr. V 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



27 



NORMAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture & Nature 

Study 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing (%) 
Cookery ( % ) 
Sewing (%) 
Gymnasium 



Winter Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing (%) 
Cookery (%) 
Sewing (%) 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture & 

Nature Studv 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing ( V 2 ) 
Cookery (%) 
Sewing (%) 
Gymnasium 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 

Plane Geometry, or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Household 

Management 
Gymnasium 



English II 

Plane Geometry, or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Household 

Management 
Gymnasium 



English II 

Plane Geometry, or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Home Nursing 

Gymnasium 



THIRD YEAR 



English III 
Arithmetic 
El, Psychology 

U. S. History 
Cookery II (%) 
Sewing II (%) 
Gymnasium 



English III 

Arithmetic 

El. Pedagogy, Obs 

& Teaching 
Civics 

Cookery II (%) 
Sewing II (%) 
Gymnasium 



English III 
Physiology 
El. Pedagogy, Obs. 

& Teaching 
Rural Sociology 
Cookery II (%) 
Sewing II (%) 
Gymnasium 



FOURTH YEAR 



English IV 

Method-Reviews 

Adv. Pyschology 

Dietetics 

Adv. Chemistry 

& Bacteriology 
Gymnasium 



English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Pyschology 
Home and Social Ec. 
Adv. Chemistry 

& Bacteriology 
Gymnasium 



English IV 
Method-Reviews 
Adv. Psychology 
Special Methods 
Adv. Chemistry 

& Bacteriology 
Gymnasium 



FIFTH YEAR 



English V 

Hist, of Education 

Adv. Pedagogy 

Textiles 

Adv. Am. History 

Gymnasium 



English V 

Prin. of Education 

Teaching 

Millinery 

Adv. Am. History 

Gymnasium 



English V 

School Administration 

Elective 

Art Needlework 

Political Science 

Gymnasium 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



MECHANIC ARTS COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Algebra 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Mechanic Arts I 
Drill 



Winter Term 
English I 
Algebra 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Mechanic Arts I 
Drill 



Spring Term 
English I 
Algebra 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Mechanic Arts I 
Drill 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Mechanic Arts II 
Drill 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Mechanic Arts 
Drill 



II 



English II 
Plane Geometry 
Modern History 
Chemistry 
Mechanic Arts II 
Drill 



THIRD YEAR 



English III 

Arithmetic 

Physics 

Elective 

Mechanic Arts 

Gymnasium 



III 



English III 
Commercial Law 
Physics 
Elective 

Mechanic Arts III 
Gymnasium 



English III 

Elective 

Physics 

Elective 

Mechanic Arts III 

Gymnasium 



FOURTH YEAR 



English IV 
Solid Geometry 

Mechanic Arts IV 
Elective 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English IV English IV 
Solid Geometry (%) 

Advanced Algebra (%) Advanced Algebra 

Mechanic Arts IV Mechanic Arts IV 

Elective Elective 

Elective Elective 

Gymnasium Gymnasium 



FIFTH YEAR 



Applied Mechanics 
Trig. & Surveying 
Electricity 
Mechanic Arts V 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Engines 

Trig. & Surveying 

Electricity 

Mechanic Arts V 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



Applied Mechanics 
Trig. & Surveying 
Electricity 
Mechanic Arts V 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Mechanics Arts V: One year's work selected from the fol- 
lowing: Carpentry and Building, Building Construction, 
Joinery and Cabinet-Making, Concrete Construction, Electric 
Wiring, Machine Shop Practice, Interior Finishing and 
Painting, Engines, Blacksmithing, Machine Drawing, Archi- 
tectural Drawing, and Plumbing and Steam Fitting. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



29 



JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



FIE ST YEAE 



Fall Term 
English I 
Algebra, or 

Ancient History 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Cookery I ( Y 2 ) 
Sewing I (%) 
Gymnasium 



Winter Term 
English I 
Algebra, or 

Ancient History 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Cookery I ( % ) 
Sewing I ( V 2 ) 
Gymnasium 



Spring Term 
English I 
Algebra, or 

Ancient History 
Agriculture & 

Nature Study 
Elective 

Cookery I (%) 
Sewing I ( V 2 ) 
Gymnasium 



SECOND YEAE 



English II 
Elective 

Modern History 
Chemistry 
Household 

Management 
Gymnasium 



English II 
Elective 

Modern History 
Chemistry 
Household 

Management 
Gymnasium 



English II 
Elective 

Modern History 
Chemistry 
Home Nursing 

Gymnasium 



THIED YEAE 



English III 

Arithmetic 

Phvsics 

Elective 

Cookery II (%) 

Sewing II (%) 

Gymnasium 



English III 

Arithmetic 

Physics 

Elective 

Cookery II ( y 2 ) 

Sewing II (%) 

Gymnasium 



English III 

Physiology 

Physics 

Elective 

Cookery II ( V 2 ) 

Sewing II ( V 2 ) 

(gymnasium 



FOURTH YEAE 



English IV 

Adv. Chemistry & 

Bacteriology 
Dietetics 
Elective 
Textiles 
Gymnasium 



English IV 

Adv. Chemistry & 

Bacteriology 
Home and Social Ec. 
Elective 
Millinery 
Gymnasium 



English IV 

Adv. Chemistry i 

Bacteriology 
Elective 
Elective 

Art Needlework 
Gymnasium 



30 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



THREE YEAR SECONDARY NORMAL COURSE 

Leading to the elementary certificates. 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture 
Pen. & Spelling 
P. S. Music ( % ) . 
P. S. Drawing ( y 2 ) 
Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture 
Geography 
P. S. Music ( V 2 ) 
P. S. Drawing ( y 2 ) 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 
English I 
Algebra, or Ancient 

History 
Agriculture 
Geography 
P. S. Music (%) 
P. S. Drawing ( y 2 ) 
Drill or Gym. 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 

PI. Geometry or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 

or Biology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II 

PI. Geometry or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 

or Biology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



English II 

PI. Geometry or 

Algebra 
Modern History 
Chemistry 

or Biology 
Elective 
Drill or Gym. 



THIRD YEAR 



English III 
Arithmetic 
El. Psychology 

U. S. History 

Elective 

Gymnasium 



English III 
Arithmetic 
El. Pedagogy 

Obs. -Teaching 
Civics 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



English III 
Physiology 
El. Pedagogy 

Obs. -Teaching 
Rural Sociology 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



This course or its equivalent is a prerequisite for en- 
rollment in either the senior or junior normal courses. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



31 



ACADEMIC COURSE 



FIEST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Ancient History 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



Winter Term 
English I 
Ancient History 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



Spring Ten 
English I 
Ancient History 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 

Algebra 

Modern History 

Chemistry, or Biology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym 



English II 

Algebra 

Modern History 

Chemistry, or Biology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym 



English II 

Algebra 

Modern History 

Chemistry, or Biology 

Elective 

Drill or Gym 



THIRD YEAR 



Plane Geometry 
English III 
Physics 
Social Science 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Plane Geometry 
English III 
Physics 
Social Science 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Plane Geometry 
English III 
Physics 
Social Science 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



Xote 1. All electives must be from accredited high scnool 
subjects approved by the enrolling officer. 

Note 2. Students expecting to enter engineering courses 
should elect Higher Algebra and Solid Geometry. 



32 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



COMMERCIAL COURSE 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping 
Pen. & Spelling 
Ec. History 
Drill or Gym 



Winter Term 
English I 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping 
Pen. & Spelling 
Geography 
Drill or Gym 



Spring Term 
English I 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping 
Pen. & Spelling 
Geography 
Drill or Gym 



SECOND YEAR 



English II 

Algebra 

Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 

Gymnasium, or Drill 



English II 

Algebra 

Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 

Gymnasium, or Drill 



English II 

Algebra 

Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 

Gymnasium, or Drill 



THIRD YEAR 



Modern History 
Plane Geometry 
Raw Materials 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Gymnasium 



Modern History 
Plane Geometry 
Commercial Law 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Gymnasium 



Modern History 
Plane Geometry 
Business English 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Gymnasium 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



33 



TWO YEAR COMMERCIAL COURSE 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Term 
English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



Winter Term 
English I. 
Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



Spring Term 
English I. 
Comm. Arithmetic 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 

Spelling 
Drill or Gym. 



SECOND YEAR 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Economic History 
Raw Materials 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Commercial Law 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



English II. 
Bookkeeping or 

Shorthand 
Commercial Geog. 
Business English 
Elective 
Drill or Gym 



COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 

(Two Winter Terms) 



First Year 
Short Course English 
Farm Arithmetic 
Agriculture 
Carpentry ( y 2 ) 
Blacksmithing ( y 2 ) 



Engine Lectures 
Gymnasium 



Second Year 
Business Papers and 

English 
Farm Accounting 

(2 da.) 
Farm Mechanics 

(3 da.) 
Carpentry II. ( V 2 ) 
Blacksmithing II. (%). 
Steam and Gas Engines 

and Boilers 
Mechanical 

Drawing ( V 2 ) 
Machine Shop 

Practice (Yz) 
Gymnasium 



34 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



SHORT COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



First Year 
Short Course English 



Second Year 
Dressmaking 
Short Course Arithmetic Cooking II. 
Cooking (4 da.) 



Food Study (1 da.) 



Sewing 

Art Needlework 

Gymnasium 



Home Nursing (2 da.) 
Household Management 

and Accounting 

(3 da.) 
Millinery 
Elective 
Gymnasium 



THREE YEAR PIANO COURSE 



First Year 
Piano 

Harmony 3-5 
Mus. Appre. 1-5 
Mus. History 1-5 
German 
English I. 



Second Year 
Harmony 3-5 
Piano 

Mus. Appre. 1-5 
Mus. History 1-5 
Voice 
English II 



Third Year 

Piano 

Ensemble Playing 
Nor. Piano Meth. 
Psychology 
English III 



THREE YEAR VOICE COURSE 



First Year 
Voice 
Piano 

Ear Training 2-5 
Sight Singing 3-5 

Harmony 
English I 



Second Year 
Voice 
Piano 

Sight Singing 
Harmony 3-5 



1-5 



Musical History 1-5 
English II 



Third Year 
Voice 

Public School Music 
Psychology 
Music Annrecia- 

tion 2-5 
German 
English III 



NORMAL ANT) INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 35 



Description of Courses 

EDUCATION AND NORMAL COURSES 

One of the most urgent needs of the state of North Dakota 
is well educated" and trained teachers • to serve in the public 
schools. The thoughtful observer who has studied public 
school conditions as they are, is easily persuaded that no other 
requirement relating to education is of such pressing import- 
ance. The Act which defines the mission of the State Normal 
and Industrial School requires it to train teachers "in the 
science of education and the art of teaching in the public 
schools, with special reference to manual training. ' ' 

The school maintains an organized bureau of recommenda- 
tions to assist its graduates in securing positions to teach. 
ELEMENTARY PEDAGOGY AND OBSERVATION 

A course in the principles and methods of teaching and gen- 
eral school management, supplemented by thirty periods of ob- 
servation and assistant teaching in the model schools of the 
Normal Department. 

This course is open to students doing third year work in 
the Secondary Courses and continues thru two terms. 

This course, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite to the ad- 
vanced courses in education. 

PSYCHOLOGY I 

Elementary Psychology. A course designed as preparatory 
to the work .in elementary pedagogy and to the later courses 
in psychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY II 

General Psychology. A study of the laws of mental life 
and of the functions of the various mental processes. A por- 
tion Of the time is devoted to the physiological aspects of 
the subject. Laboratory exercises have an important place 
in this course. 



36 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



PSYCHOLOGY III 

Social Psychology. A study of the phenomona of mental 
action when individuals are associated together. "Leader- 
ship," "Loyalty," "Crowds and Mobs/' "Panics," " Com- 
munity Spirit," "School Spirit," "Public Sentiment" and 
kindred subjects are studied. 
PSYCHOLOGY IV 

Child Psychology. A study of the appearance, growth and 
decline of instincts and of the mental development of the 
child from birth to maturity. 

HISTOEY OF EDUCATION. A study of the educational 
systems of the chief nations of antiquity; education in its re- 
lation to Christianity; the Eenaissance, the Eeformation and 
the forces operative in our own era; a study of the life and 
practices of the chief educational reformers in the light of 
prevailing theories. Numerous outside readings and class re- 
views are required. 

PEINCIPLES OF EDUCATION. A broad conception of 
the principles of education is here presented. Especial at- 
tention is given to such themes as the functions of teaching 
and of subject matter, motivation, correlation, concentration, 
etc. The aim is to familiarize the student with such principles 
of education as will enable him to meet intelligently problems 
of class room instruction. A professional thesis is required of 
each one completing this course. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTEATION. This course is to consider 
problems of importance not ordinarily met in the class room 
instruction. The relationship of officers, teachers, parents, and 
pupils as well as questions of organization and administration 
pertaining to the state law, course of study, daily programs, 
standard tests and measurements, examinations, promotions, 
and matters of discipline will be discussed. 

PEIMAEY METHODS. A course designed especially for 
those who anticipate teaching in the primary, grades. Indus- 
trial work, story telling, phonetic reading, primary songs and 
number work is emphasized from the view point of daily plans. 
The work is principally lectures and students are required to 
make carefully written reports. 

ADVANCED PEDAGOGY. This is especially for Senior 
students who enroll for observation and teaching. It is de- 
signed to meet the problems peculiar to the observation and 
teaching work. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 37 



LITERATURE IN THE GRADES. This consists of a care- 
ful study of some of the classics required by the state course 
of study for the grades. In this work the aim is to bring out 
not only the thought, but also the beauty, form and manner of 
the presentation and make the prospective teacher familiar 
with the subject matter of reading. 

GEOGRAPHY. Two terms' work is required in Normal 
courses. This includes a review of descriptive, political and 
commercial geography with methods of teaching. Some study 
is also made of the elements of mathematical and physical 
geography. 

REVIEWS AND METHODS. The subject mater of arith- 
metic, reading, language, grammar, history and geography re- 
viewed; the principles and methods of teaching emphasized. 
The work is especially designed to train students to teach. 
The subject matter, teacher's aim, method, preparation and 
presentation are carefully considered with special reference to 
the grades. 

OBSERVATION AND TEACHING. Designed to train 
prospective teachers in the principles and methods of effective 
teaching. The Model Rural School and the Ellendale city 
schools serve as the model schools for the normal students, 
also opportunity for observation and teaching is found in the 
classes of the preparatory department, the department of man- 
ual training, the department of domestic science and arts. 
Both observation and teaching take place under the direct 
supervision of a trained teacher, who is thoroly capable not 
only of directing the efforts of pupil-teachers, but of offering 
the most helpful and painstaking criticism. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY. A course which considers the prob- 
lems of the rural community and especially the teacher's rela 
tion to these problems. The school as a factor in community 
interests and the reaction of teacher and community upon 
their common fields will be considered. This will be largely 
an investigation course primarily for seniors in the normal 
courses, but is open to others with sufficient preparation to 
carry the work. 

MECHANIC ARTS 

The purpose is two-fold: 

First, to train young men for vocations, giving opportunity 
for specializing in their choice from a wide range of subjects. 



38 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



Second, to train teachers of vocational subjects and manual 
arts. 

Few schools in the United States are better equipped for 
this work; no other school in the state is so well equipped. 
The shops and laboratories are well supplied with every mod- 
ern appliance which can aid in acquiring practical knowledge 
of industrial subjects. 

The school reserves the right to keep any or all student 
work done in this department. 

Mechanic Arts I 

1. JOINEEY: 

a. Care and use of tools. Application of the common hand 
tools used by carpenters and joiners, such as saw, plane, 
filister, chisel, hammer, square, marking guage, bevel, boring 
bit and other hand tools, in the construction of the principal 
joints employed in carpentry and joinery. 

b. When some proficiency has been gained in joinery, use- 
ful articles are made, either for the use of the school or for 
the student. 

2. ELEMENTAEY CABINET MAKING: 

Class to construct a project in cabinet work, such as a desk, 
table, chair, settee, bookcase, stand, pedestal, or other pieces 
of useful furniture. These articles are constructed in order 
that the student may further apply the principles he has 
learned. Pieces to be finished in approved manner. 

3. MECHANICAL DKAWING. (4 hours per week) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Instrumental Drawing. Proper care and use of instru- 
ments, with practice exercises to gain facility in line work. 

c. Geometrical Drawing. A knowledge of geometric terms, 
also mastery of geometric problems commonly met with in me- 
chanical drawing; especial attention given to accuracy of con- 
struction. 

d. Othographic Projection: 

A knowledge of the use of planes in projection. This work, 
. which is part of descriptive geometry, is the immediate founda- 
tion of mechanical drawing. In connection with it students are 
required to bring to class shop sketches or freehand drawings 
of articles being made in the wood shop. Working drawings, 
both detail and assembly, are made from these sketches. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 39 



Mechanic Arts II. 

1. FORGING: 

a. Practice in drawing out, bending to shape, forming an- 
gles from straight pieces, swaging, fullering, and various forms 
of welding iron and mild steel. 

b. This course includes a number of useful articles, such as 
a bracket, a brace, a shackle, swivel, tongs, hook and chain, 
clevis, cold chisel, heading tool, bolts, cape-chisel, punch and 
hammer. 

Special attention is given to the study of the manufacture 
of different grades of steel, its hardening and tempering. 

Forging is carried further in fourth year work, in making 
and tempering machine tools. 

2. FOUNDRY PRACTICE: 

Molding and core work; melting and casting iron and brass; 
molding machines and other labor-saving devices; the mixing 
of iron; the operation of the cupola; the mixing and melting 
of brass and other soft metals. 

Students make all castings for machine shop work. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Freehand Drawing and Freehand Lettering. 

b. Constructive design. (1) Freehand working drawings, 
properly lettered and dimensioned. (2) Instrumental draw r - 
ings, made to scale, from sketches in (1). 

c. Isometric and cabinet perspective. Practical problems. 

Mechanic Arts III. 
1. TURNERY: 

The course in w T ood-turning includes (a) center, face-plate, 
screw, hollow T -chuck and template turning, including exercises 
thru which the difficult problems in lathe work are mastered. 

The course includes the cylinder, cone and V grooves, con- 
cave curve, convex curve and compound curve, also hollow 
turning, together with exercises combining either a number, or 
all, of these operations. 

Useful articles in w^hich the principles learned in (a) are 
applied, including a box with cover, a vase, handles for 
various tools, a mallet, spindles for porch work or furniture, 
stair balusters and various other useful articles. This work is 
carried further in its application in pattern making. 



40 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



2. PATTERN MAKING: 

In all this work especial consideration is necessarily given 
to the work of the foundry which is to follow. Patterns are 
made of a number of models which involve the more elemen- 
tary problems in foundry practice; these are followed by 
patterns of parts of machines, including a hand-wheel and 
blanks for a cam, gear-wheel and bevel-gear. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING: 

a. Sheet Metal Patterns. Graphical methods of solving 
problems of lines, planes, surfaces and solids and their applica- 
tion in sheet metal pattern making. Problems include patterns 
of stovepipe elbow, a chimney cap, a T and a Y joint. All 
articles in this course of which patterns are made, are con- 
structed either of metal or paper. 

b. Architectural Drawing. Original plans for a two-story 
frame dwelling or other frame building. This course is made 
very practical. After the rough sketches have been made, the 
floor, basement and footing plans are drawn to scale, also sec- 
tional wall views showing the construction; and at least two 
views of the completed structure — the drawing including roof 
plan and longitudinal and lateral sections. Specifications are 
drawn up and an estimate of the cost of building materials 
and labor is made. Tracings and blue prints are made of the 
complete set of plans. Special students are carrying this work 
further and are actually building models in the shop, in which 
the methods of construction are identical with those used in 
actual house building. 



Mechanic Arts IV. 
1. CHIPPING AND FILING: 

a. Exercises are given fo» the purpose of developing skill 
in the use of the file and the cold chisel. These tools are of 
especial value in almost every line of mechanical work, as, for 
instance, in erecting and repairing machinery, whether in the 
shop or on the farm. Their usefulness is so well known, and 
the inability of the average man to use them properly is also 
so well known, that it seems proper to give them special at- 
tentibn in this course. 

b. In connection with and in addition to the above, a num- 
ber of useful articles are made from sheet steel. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 41 



2. MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE: 

a. Machine tool making. Students make and temper the 
tools which they will use in their machine tool practice. 

b. Machine tool work. Explanation of the different forms 
of machine tools, directions for operating machines and keep- 
ing tools in order; practice in centering and in plain, taper, 
and template turning, chucking, drilling, boring, external and 
internal thread cutting, hand tool turning, polishing and filing. 

c. Tool and screw making. Use of the lathe, planer, milling 
machine, indexed center, hand tools, standard guages, microm- 
eter and Vernier calipers in the construction of reamers, taps 
and dies, machine screws, nuts, studs and formed work. In 
this course the machine work is done on the articles cast in 
the foundry during the preceding year. The greater share of 
the machine tool practice of the entire course consists in ma- 
chining the products of the foundry. 

d. Class to do the machining and erecting of a small en- 
gine, a lathe, or some other project involving similar opera- 
tions. 

3. MECHANICAL DRAWING. (4 hours per week.) 

a. Lettering and conventional representations of frequently 
recurring parts of machinery, such as nuts, threads, fastenings, 
etc. 

b. The study and drawing of disc and shaft cams, to pro- 
duce different forms of motion of both regular and intermit- 
tent. 

c. A study in elementary mechanism including different pro- 
cesses of obtaining straight line motion and graphic solution 
of allied problems. 

d. Design and drawing of different kinds of gear wheels, ob- 
taining the proper shape of teeth from the involute and cy- 
cloids. Drawing spur, mitre and bevel gears. 

Note: A thesis on some mechanical subject of not less than 
1800 words in typewritten form will be required in connection 
with the work in English. A typewritten copy to be left with 
the department. 

^ Mechanic Arts V. 

1. SHOP WORK. (6 hours per week). 

Advanced cabinet making with special attention given to 
the selection of materials, design and finish is given to stu- 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALQG 



dents choosing wood work. Advanced machine work, with 
special attention given to machine tool making is given to 
students choosing metal work. 

Note: Normal Manual Training students take up more the 
professional side of the work in the spring term. 

2. MECHANICAL DKAWING: (4 hours per week). 

The subject of Descriptive Geometry is treated in the form 
of lectures, where each problem is thoroughly explained and 
solved graphically before the class, which problems are later 
solved by each member of the class in the drafting room. 
Problems dealing with the building trades are largely con- 
sidered and practically applied so far as possible. 

3. NORMAL MANUAL TRAINING: (Spring term only). 

(a) Hand-work for Primary Grades. 

1. PAPER AND CARDBOARD CONSTRUCTION: 

This work is taken up as it should be presented in the 
public schools. The different steps in paper folding are given, 
developing into the construction of familiar articles. The use 
of paste and scissors is developed early in the course. Free- 
hand cutting is given for training the eye in regard to form 
and for composition. Portfolios, booklets, boxes, etc., are con- 
structed of heavy paper and cardboard. 

2. CLAY MODELING AND POTTERY: 

Some training is given in modeling type forms from simple 
objects in nature. The greater share of the time is devoted 
to the making of pottery. 

First grade pottery work includes simple hand-built pieces 
i?ivolving different methods of construction. In the third and 
fourth grades simple incised ornament is studied. The class 
is instructed in the craft of mould-made pieces and a few 
pieces are made" by the class. Students glaze a part of their 
work. 

:;. WEAVING AND BASKETRY: 

Weaving begins with the use of paper mats, different pat- 
terns being worked out in several media. The materials in- 
cluded are raffia, jute, common wool yarns and, for the fourth 
grade, hand-dyed worsted of the finest quality. Problems in- 
clude pencil bags, book bags, holders, mats, special designed 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 43 



rugs, hammocks and larger rugs. Basketry consists of the 
problems used in elementary grades, simple rattan mats and 
baskets, handles, hinges, etc. Coiled mats and simple baskets 
are executed and a few methods of using raffia and construc- 
tive work are illustrated. 

4. THIN WOOD CONSTRUCTION: 

The assembling of thin pieces of wood by means of glue and 
braids to form miniature pieces of furniture; the construction 
of a miniature house. The Avork consists, in part, of a com- 
bination of wood and cardboard. 

b. Woodwork for Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 

(1) WOODWORK FOR FOURTH AND FIFTH GRADES. 

The purpose here is to train the prospective teacher in the 
simpler processes in wood construction. 

The work consists of a set of articles of simple construction 
intended to appeal to the pupils' interest. For the greater 
part, they are graded, but some opportunity is given, as in 
all courses, for original design. The work is similar in char- 
acter to courses offered in the elementary grades of any first 
class public school system. The tools used are the knife, block 
plane, back saw, coping saw, chisel, bit and brace, carving 
punch, file, try-square, hammer, rule and pencil. For most of 
the exercises the material is prepared in thickness before be- 
ing given to the student. Workmanlike methods are aimed 
at; blue prints of the course are made. 

(2) WOODWORK FOR THE SIXTH, SEVENTH AND 

EIGHTH GRADES: 

Here serious attention is first given to following the meth- 
ods of the skilled mechanic. It is the aim to keep always in 
mind the interest and capacity of the pupils being taught. 

The work is similar to that planned for the grades of the 
public schools where there is an equipment of workbenches 
and a rather full set of tools. In the seventh and eighth 
grades there are numerous exercises in cabinet making in 
which the simpler methods of joinery are involved. The use 
of sandpaper, files, stains and varnish is introduced in finish- 
ing some of the pieces. 

c. Outline of Courses for Secondary Schools. 

These courses include all the instruction offered in the full 
Mechanic Arts Course to which is added more comprehensive 



44 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



exercises in Joinery, Advanced Cabinet Design and Construc- 
tion, Wood Carving, Hammered Metal Work, Drawing and 
Design. 

3. MANUAL TEAINING DESIGN: 

Study of the elements of design, line, dark and light and 
color and the application of the principles of harmony. The 
object of the instruction is to develop appreciation through 
the study of art-structure. The course begins with design in 
the abstract, harmonious arrangement of spaces being given 
special attention. Application of the theory of design in 
technical problems; designs for furniture; textiles, wall cov- 
erings, stained glass, interiors, etc. Problems worked out in 
the shop. 

4. APPLIED MECHANICS: 

The object of this course is to provide students with a prac- 
tical knowledge of the principles of Mechanics essential to an 
intelligent interest in the constructive arts. It embraces a 
study of simple framed structures, strength of materials, 
beams, riveted joints, shafts, springs, elementary mechanism, 
simple machines, hydraulics, and power transmission. 

5. ENGINES AND BOILEES: 

The purpose of this term's work is to introduce to the Me- 
chanic Arts student the general elementary principles of gas 
engines, and steam engines and boilers. A text is used, sup- 
plemented by) work with engines in the laboratory. 

6. ELECTRICITY: 

One year of elementary work in electricity beyond that giv- 
en in physics is required of all mechanic arts students. Di- 
rect and alternating current machines and appliances; carrying 
capacity and resistance of conductors; wiring formulae and 
methods of installation; batteries, accumulators and theory of 
the magnetic circuit are some of the subjects briefly covered. 
A text book is used in connection with lectures and drafting 
room work. 

7. SPECIAL METHODS: 

Special Methods is a subject largely professional with the 
manual training teacher and treats particularly of his or her 
problems concerning different systems and methods of pre- 
senting the subject. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 45 



COURSE IN FARM ENGINEERING 

This course is planned to meet the most practical require- 
ments of young men on the up-to-date farm. A certificate of 
proficiency will be given upon a satisfactory completion of the 
work. The course extends over two winter terms and includes 
the following subjects: 

FARM ARITHMETIC: 

The work will involve factors, fractions, decimals, denomi- 
nate numbers, practical measurements, etc. Problems dealing 
with such subjects as marketing, measurements of walls, crops, 
cost of fences, buildings, silos, rations. 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH: 

(a) The course in Grammar is intended to give the stu- 
dents basis for oral and written composition, (b) The course 
in Language and Grammar, more elementary than course (a), 
is intended to give pupils a correct working knowledge of 
written and spoken English, (c) The course in Letter Com- 
position is primarily for the young men, and includes such 
letters as the average farmer is obliged to write. Penman- 
ship, spelling, punctuation, as well as form and expression of 
thought are emphasized, (d) The course in Reading is plan- 
ned to give an acquaintance with current industrial literature 
related to other subjects of the course. The selections read 
are chosen for their practical utility, and getting the thought 
will receive more attention than' formal expression. 

The student taking one of the short courses is expected to 
elect one or more of these courses, selection to be made on 
approval of enrolling officer. 

AGRICULTURE: 

An elementary study of the different kinds of soils, soil and 
water, the germination of seeds, requirements in the growth of 
seedlings, conservation of moisture, soil fertility, rotation of 
crops, varieties of stock and stock breeding. 

CARPENTRY I: 

Care and use of tools, forms of joints employed in making 
articles for the home and farm. Timber splices; construction 
of modern farm gates, etc. Cutting of simple rafters and 
simple framing. 



46 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



BLACKSMITHING I: 

Alternates with the class in Carpentry I, and consists of the 
care of the forge fire, drawing, upsetting, bending, swaging 
and the different forms of welding iron. A part of this work 
will consist of lectures, covering the processes of the manu- 
facture of iron and steel, with methods of hardening and 
tempering. 

ENGINE LECTURES: 

First term subject and consists of the study of the growth 
and development of steam and gas engines, types and effi- 
ciency; forms of governors; two and four cycle engines; cool- 
ing and ignition systems; lubrication. Laboratory study when 
necessary. 

FARM ACCOUNTING: 

A short course in bookkeeping, dealing especially with farm 
transactions. The shortest, most simple way of keeping ac- 
counts, the taking of inventories and the means of learning 
the exact state of the business receive special attention. 

BUSINESS PAPERS AND ENGLISH: 

In this course the proper forms of ordinary business papers 
will be studied with a view to ascertaining the rights of the 
parties to business transactions and the use and meaning of 
business forms. Some exercises in English writing will be 
given. 

FARM MECHANICS: 

Study and application of levers, resultant of forces, work, 
energy, friction, velocity, mass and combinations, pulleys an^ 
mechanical advantage. 

CARPENTRY II: 

A continuation of Carpentry Is construction of door and 
window frames; cutting and laying of sills, joists, and floor- 
ing, also cutting of hip, jack and valley rafters. Special at- 
tention is given to outside and inside finishing and cabinet 
making. 

BLACKSMITHING lis 

Alternates with Mechanical Drawing. A continuation of 
Blacksmithing I, in the making of punches, chisels, shaping 
and tempering machine tools. Many tools are made for farm 
use. 






NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 47 



MECHANICAL DBA WING: 

A brief practical course with special reference to the draft- 
ing of plans for farm apparatus and structures. Farm build- 
ing plans and plans for the location of farm structures will 
receive attention. 

STEAM AND GAS ENGINES, BOILERS: 

Second term work, a continuation of Engine Lectures; large- 
ly laboratory practice. Study in adjustment of working parts; 
use of indicator; brake and indicated tests; methods of boiler 
feed; efficiency test of small steam plant. Opportunity will 
be given for the study of special problems. 

MACHINE SHOP PRACTICE: 

Alternates with advanced carpentry. The student will be 
given instruction in chipping and filing, with practice in shap- 
ing and setting machine tools, also practice in the manipula- 
tion of modern metal working machines. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

This department aims to meet the needs of two classes of 
students: 

1, To fit graduates to teach Domestic Science and Domestic 
Art in the grades and High School. 

2. Special students or students of the regular courses who 
desire to secure training as a preparation for home life in its 
.larger significance. 

COOKERY I: 

This course aims to give practice in cooking the more fun- 
damental foods and in serving simple meals. Sufficient repeti- 
tion of processes is given to secure a fair degree of manipu- 
lation of materials and utensils. 

It also includes a study of the food materials, growth, pro- 
duction, manufacture, adulteration, costs, composition, digesti- 
bility and nutritive value. 

COOKERY II: 

The second course in cookery provides additional practice in 
work with foods and emphasizes the professional aspect of the 
work. The student is trained not only to obtain good results 
in housekeeping and cookery, but also to think and work with 
the view of presenting the subject matter to others. 

Emphasis is also placed on preservation of fruits and vege- 



48 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



tables, preparation of foods in season and in large quantities. 
They make a study of proper combinations of foods both 
from the nutritive and the aesthetic standpoint. A study is 
made of the principles and methods of serving both formal 
and informal meals most efficiently. Each student plans and 
executes a luncheon for six people for a special cost per plate. 
The marketing is done by the student and the caloric value 
must be carefully figured. 

Each student is required to plan, work up and present a 
demonstration lecture on some phase of cookery. 

This course also considers invalid cookery. Dishes are pre- 
pared for certain diseases, and dainty and attractive serving 
of invalid trays is fully considered. 

HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT: 

Under this course various topics are considered. It aims to 
give the students an insight into the complexities of the mod- 
ern household, and to fit them to organize and successfully 
cope with the problems concerned with the administration of 
household affairs. 

The course begins with a brief survey of the evolution of 
the home and leads to the planning of a home for an ap- 
proximate amount to suit the needs of a given family, with 
especial attention given to saving the strength and time of 
the housekeeper. Special study is made of the plumbing, 
heating and lighting systems, also of the furnishing and deco- 
rating of the home to meet artistic, economic and sanitary 
requirements. It further considers the organization and man- 
agement of the modern household with its relation to econ- 
omy and that in turn to efficiency. 

HOME NURSING: 

The design of this course is to give a practical knowledge 
for the general care of cases of illness in the home. It fur- 
nishes instruction in simple emergencies and accidents which 
may occur in the home or elsewhere. 

Practical work is supplemented wherever possible. A text 
book is used. 

NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY: 

This course emphasizes the physiology of nutrition. One 
course in physiology is a prerequisite. It gives the student 
the scientific principles upon which to base his study of Die- 
tetics. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 49 



DIETETICS: 

Attention is given to the problems of human nutrition and 
their application to the feeding of the infant, the adolescent, 
the adult and the aged in both sickness and health. The work- 
ing out of the energy value of the various food materials and 
the energy requirements of individuals living under specific 
conditions. 

SPECIAL METHODS: 

This course considers the professional aspect of Home Econ- 
omics. It aims to organize the practical information needed 
by a teacher in introducing or conducting the work. Methods 
of teaching are studied with reference to the preparation and 
presentation of lessons, class and laboratory management. 

Careful consideration is given to the planning of courses of 
study and equipment for specific schools, and under varying 
conditions. 

HOME AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS: 

Considers such subjects as the organization and develop- 
ment of the primitive home, the origin and development of 
industries, woman in modern industry, woman in social serv- 
ice, the ethics of spending, the work of the Consumers League, 
the choice and consideration of sociological problems in which 
women should take great interest. 

SEWING I: 

This subject provides a practical course in hand sewing and 
garment making. The aim of this course is to teach the 
fundamental principles of plain sewing; the interpretation and 
use of commercial patterns; neatness, accuracy, and skill; the 
care and use of the sewing machine. Emphasis is placed upon 
the selection of suitable materials as to their width, cost, dur- 
ability and laundering. Commercial patterns are used for all 
garments made in this course. The following named garments 
are made; a three-piece suit of underwear, a cotton dress, 
lingerie waist, middy blouse and a separate cotton skirt. 
Laboratory five hours per week. 

Each girl expecting to take sewing should provide herself 
with sharp pointed scissors not less than six inches in length, 
thimble, tape measure with numbers on both sides, pin cushion 
3 by 6 inches of woolen material, paper of pins, and package 
of needles sizes 5 to 10. 



50 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



SEWING II: 

Commercial patterns are studied and used in the making of 
a wool dress, and a silk dress. Students fit each other. Stu- 
dents draft patterns to their own measurements. The tape 
and ruler drafting system is used. Designing in tissue paper 
is done on flat patterns; also designing is done on dress forms. 
A lingerie waist and a separate skirt are made from patterns 
drafted and designed by students. Special attention is placed 
upon good lines, good design, suitability of the different ma- 
terials and shades to the individual student, combination of 
materials and trimmings. Laboratory five hours per week. 

MILLINERY: 

The purpose of this course is to develop skill in handling 
materials and to create a taste in their selection. The term's 
work includes frame making, molding of shapes, the covering 
and trimming of these shapes in cloth and in straw and the 
making of flowers and ornaments. Laboratory ten hours per 
week. 

TEXTILES: 

In this course the study of the development of industries 
pertaining to Domestic Art is taken up; viz. carding, spin- 
ning and weaving. The four important fibers are studied 
closely as to their growth, methods of manufacture, bleaching 
and dyeing. Adulterations of the different fibers are studied 
and materials are tested. Standard materials are discussed as 
to their weave, durability, width, price and use. Recitation 
and laboratory five hours per week. 

ART NEEDLEWORK: 

Instruction is given in the stitches in crocheting, knitting, 
tatting, cross-stitch, hemstitching, French embroidery, eye- 
lets, scallops, drawn work and Swedish weaving. These 
stitches are applied to personal garments and household fur- 
nishings. Laboratory ten hours per week. 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 51 



HOME ECONOMICS SHORT COURSE 

This course affords an opportunity for girls who ,can attend 
only during the winter months, to secure a brief course in 
some of the most practical subjects of Domestic Economy. 

A girl upon completing the work outlined will be entitled to 
a certificate to that effect. 

ARITHMETIC: 

A practical course in the elements, factoring, decimals, prac- 
tical- measurements, percentage. Chief emphasis will be laid 
upon problems pertaining to home and farm. 

SHORT COURSE ENGLISH: 

This course is intended to give the pupil a correct working 
knowledge ol written and spoken English. For election to be 
made see the description of this course given under Farm En- 
gineering. 

COOKERY: 

A study of the principles and practice of cookery. This 
course includes the preparation of all classes of foods — fruits, 
vegetables, meats, eggs, salads, pastry, bread, cakes, etc., and 
the principles involved in each. Special attention is given to 
the planning and cost of meals and to table setting and serving. 
(Daily.) 

S. C. SEWING I: 

Garment making and the use of commercial patterns. Prog- 
ress depends upon the individual, and the kind of work varies 
according to the ability of the pupil. 

S. C. ART NEEDLEWORK: 

This course includes the making of the principal art needle- 
work stitches and their application to personal garments and 
household furnishings. 

S. C. SEWING II: 

Garment making continued with special attention given to 
the selection of material as to color, quality, suitability and 
purpose; also fitting and finishing. 

MILLINERY: 

See description under preceding course. 



52 ' NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



MATHEMATICS 



ARITHMETIC: 

A complete review of the essentials of arithmetic, including 
the fundamental processes, fractoring, fractions, decimals, do- 
nominate numbers, longitude and time, practical measurements 
and percentage, together with the best methods of presenting 
these various subjects to pupils of the public schools. All ab- 
cract combinations are preceded, as far as possible, by con- 
structive effort and the work made objective. In the more ad- 
vanced units of study the subjects will be treated as they occur 
in actual business transactions regardless of text book limits. 

ARITHMETIC. (SHORT COURSE) 

Industrial Arithmetic. Chief emphasis will be laid upon 
problems pertaining to the farm. The work will involve frac- 
tions, decimals, denominate numbers, practical measurements 
and percentage. Problems dealing with such matters as the 
cost of buildings, marketing, measurements, insurance, taxes 
and banking will be taught in the most practical business- 
like fashion. Daily thru the Winter Term. 

ALGEBRA. ONE YEAR: 

All elementary algebra is covered up to and including quadra- 
tic equations, especial emphasis being laid on the fundamental 
laws of algebra, their derivation, and their relation to the 
solution of problems. The relation of algebra to arithmetic 
and to the higher branches of mathematics is constantly kept 
in mind and the practical uses of algebra noted. 

PLANE GEOMETRY. ONE YEAR: 

Geometry, inductive and deductive. The student is grounded 
in the fundamental principles of the subject. Methods of rea- 
soning; the classification of the various geometrical forms, lines, 
angles and surfaces, and the various kinds of proofs. The rela- 
tion of Geometry to Arithmetic. Especial emphasis on original 
and inventive work. The method of original demonstration 
thru analysis, construction and proof. Many problems in geo- 
metry as applied in engineering and surveying are preseuted. 

80LLD GEOMETRY. ONE-HALF YEAR: 

In order that the subject may be more easily comprehended, 
geometrical solids are employed in the demonstration of each 



NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 53 



proposition, and the students are also required, from time to 
time, to fashion out of cardboard various solids for use in de- 
monstrating problems in construction. The application of 
geometry to science and industry receives much attention. 

ALGEBRA II. ONE-HALF YEAR: 

Quadratic equations are reviewed and completed. The fol- 
lowing units of study are then taken up; problems and formu- 
las of physics, the theory of proportion, progressions, and log- 
arithms. 

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. ONE YEAR: 

The theoretical part of the subject is practically completed 
at mid-year. Consideration of the surveying instruments, in- 
cluding chain and tape, compass, level, transit and planimeter. 
After spring opens practically all of the time is devoted to 
field work. 

PHYSICS AND* CHEMISTRY 

The physical laboratory occupies quarters in the basement of 
Carnegie Hall. It is well lighted and equipped with table room 
and apparatus, and has, at one end, a dark room 20x25 feet 
conveniently arranged for experiments in light. 

The chemical laboratory is found in the basement of Car- 
negie Hall. It is sufficiently equipped with table room and ap- 
paratus for twenty-four students working at one time, and has 
a well equipped dark room for photography. 

PHYSICS A: 

Seven hours a week for the year. This course consists of 
lectures, experiments and recitations. The experiments are 
simple, yet full and exhaustive. Especial attention is given 
to the solution of problems involving physical laws and form- 
ulae. A series of experiments is prescribed and performed by 
students during the year and careful tabulations are made of 
the results. Especial attention is given to the fundamentals 
that lead up to the various courses in engineering. 

PHYSICS B: 

Seven hours a week for the year. Lectures will be given to 
cover the more advanced work in mechanics, the practical ap- 
pliances on heat, light, and electricity and the more complex 
formulae for solving physical problems. Laboratory work will 
be given, which has especial bearing on the topics studied and 
which will be of particular benefit to the student specializing 
in the Mechanic Arts. Prerequisite, Physics A. 



54 NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL CATALOG 



GENERAL CHEMISTRY: 

Seven hours a week for the year. Three periods a week are 
devoted to the study of the laws, theories, formulae and funda- 
mental principles of chemistry and to the solution of problems 
in chemical arithmetic. Two double periods each week are de- 
voted to laboratory work. Over one hundred experiments in- 
volving chemical change, affinity, valence, etc., including ele- 
mentary qualitative analysis, are performed and noted so that 
the student both becomes familiar with the manipulation of 
apparatus and masters the laws governing phenomena. 
CHEMISTRY OF FOODS: 

Daily for four and a half months. Designed especially for 
young women who are pursuing domestic science courses. The 
essential materials in a complete food; the reactions that occur 
in their preparation and use; the common adulterants; the 
foods in which commonly found; how recognized; household 
tests, etc. Prerequisite. Physiology and Physics A. 
QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: 

Daily for the first four and one-half months. Lecture once 
a week. Laboratory work four times a week. The course con- 
sists of a systematic study of the bases, and elements and rad- 
icals, and a method of analyzing an unknown substance of 
complex composition. Emphasis is placed on such methods as 
can be used in quantitative determinations. Prerequisite. 
General Chemistry and Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 
QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS: 

Five times a week for the last half of the year. Two and 
one-half months given to gravimetric analysis and two months 
given to valumetric analysis. Some simple substances that il- 
lustrate the fundamentals of quantitative work, are taken up 
first. Then such as pig iron, steel, cement, soil, water for pot- 
able purposes, water for boiler purposes are analyzed. Prereq- 
uisites, General Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis and Elemen- 
tary Quaulitative A